1940-1949 Torpedomen

Updated 12-20-15

1946 -  Loading torpedoes (water slugs?).  CTM H.R. Wilson is supervising at photo right.  This appears to be loading into the After Torpedo Room. 

Note the bare metal finish of the torpedo being loaded.  It appears to be a practice torpedo, since a real warheaded "fish" would be coated with a tacky black shellac.

Note AA gun on sail, visible upper left and mast top Radar antenna.
Photo provided by Don Boberick.

United States Navy training film which uses a mixture of animation and live footage to train pilots on the…

(New 10-14-15)

Jaime Quiñones

November 11 at 5:57pm · San Diego, CA

Great Veteran's Day today aboard USS Midway.

The MK-46 on the skid is part of a current restoration.

 Giving them a call soon to see about getting some prior TM's out there to help restore it.

The MK-13 was huge in the belly of that beast!

 (Brought back 12-17-15)

Alabama World War 2 NMCG Casualty List

Alabama WW2 NMCG Casualty List – B Surnames

BOOKER, William Dawson, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Jannite Walls Booker, Rt. 3, Box 284B, Mobile.

Alabama WW2 NMCG Casualty List – G Surnames

GURGANUS, Arthur Allen, Torpedoman, USN. Father, Mr. James Monrow Gurganus, P. O. Box 58, Kansas.

Alabama WW2 NMCG Casualty List – H Surnames

HARRIS, Clarence, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Sister, Miss Mary Elizabeth Harris, General Delivery, Dothan.

Alabama WW2 NMCG Casualty List – J Surnames

JONES, James Acton, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USNR. Parent’s, Mr. and Mrs. James Ned Jones, 901 Sansom Avenue, Gadsden.

Alabama WW2 NMCG Casualty List – M Surnames

MARSTON, George Franklin, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Mabel Clare Marston, 1314 15th Avenue, North Birmingham.

MILLANDER, Charles Douglas, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Lodale Millander, Centerville.

Alabama WW2 NMCG Casualty List – O Surnames

ODOM, Leonard Wilbur, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Odom, Rt. 4, Brewton.

(New 09-29-15)

Lieutenant Gerald Ford and Typhoon Cobra | Naval Historical ...

Kenneth Philip Iversen, Torpedoman

Sailor, Rest Your Oar

Ken Iversen says: January 20, 2015 at 12:55 am My father was a torpedo man on this ship as a young man during ww2 with Gerald Ford he also talked about the typhoon and how bad it was.I was looking at his photo id at that time and found his picture on the web site pictures that was fun to see him on the ship really proud of all of these men for really changing the coarse of that war his name was Kenneth Philip Iversen

- See more at: http://www.navyhistory.org/2013/02/lieutenant-gerald-ford-and-typhoon-cobra/#sthash.MIAZctQ7.dpuf

(New 09-08-15)

 

William Jabine II, reporter and editor

Former newsman later held positions with the old State Roads Commission and Department of Natural Resources

 

William Jabine (handout, Baltimore Sun )

Sailor, Rest Your Oar

Mr. Jabine served aboard the destroyer escort USS Rolf as a torpedo man in the South Pacific.

June 21, 2013|By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun

William Jabine II, a former Evening Sun reporter and assistant city editor who later became spokesman for the old State Roads Commission and the Department of Natural Resources, died Wednesday of pneumonia at Catonsville Commons Nursing and Rehabilitation Center.

The longtime Annapolis resident was 90.

"Bill was a meticulous newsman. He was always checking up on reported facts to make certain they were accurate before he put them in a story," said Helen Delich Bentley, a former newsroom colleague who later became a congresswoman and federal maritime administrator.

"That was one of the reasons that state agencies wanted someone like that on their staff, because he was such a precise person," said Mrs. Bentley.

"Bill was an aggressive reporter and a guy you could talk to, and because he was so personable, people were willing to tell him stories. And that is the essence of a newspaperman," recalled retired Baltimore Circuit Judge Thomas Ward, who had been an Evening Sun colleague. "And because he was able not to reveal confidences, people naturally trusted him."

The son of an Episcopal priest and a homemaker, William Jabine II was born in Aurora, N.Y., and lived on a farm until moving to Baltimore in 1936.

He attended Boys' Latin School and graduated in 1940 from Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va. His college studies at the University of North Carolina were interrupted during World War II when he enlisted in the Navy in 1942.

Mr. Jabine served aboard the destroyer escort USS Rolf as a torpedo man in the South Pacific. In 1946, he returned to Chapel Hill, where he earned a bachelor's degree in 1947. During his college years, he was also on the staff of the Daily Tar Heel, the university's newspaper.

Mr. Jabine went to work in 1947 for WMAR-TV as a newsreel writer and later news writer. In 1950, he joined the staff of The Evening Sun as a reporter. He later became a political reporter, covering the legislature and national political conventions.

"All the young reporters tried to imitate his sardonic personal style: a mixture of humorous skepticism and tolerant, mocking disdain. He could get most pols to reveal their innermost secrets," said David Culhane, an Evening Sun colleague who later joined CBS News in New York City.

Mr. Culhane recalled the day he was given an assignment by Mr. Jabine and explained that he had done the same story six months ago.

"He said, 'Well, David, there are only five or six good stories in our business. If you know one of them, you should tell it once in a while,'" recalled Mr. Culhane. "Wise Bill was right — I did the story again — and came to understand one of the profound mysteries of journalism."

Mr. Jabine was an assistant city editor when he left the newspaper in the early 1960s and became spokesman for the old State Roads Commission.

"At the time, State Roads was coming out from underneath the cloud of a serious scandal, and Bill helped clean up its image," said James S. Keat, a retired Sun assistant managing editor who covered state government at the time.

Another one of Mr. Jabine's duties was presiding over the opening of many bridges and roads, including the Baltimore Beltway and the Northeastern Expressway in 1963, which became a segment of today's Interstate 95.

President John F. Kennedy dedicated the last link of the road on the Mason-Dixon line that would eventually be named for him on Nov. 14, 1963.

"I remembered him talking about it," said a daughter, Margaret "Meg" Elseroad of Towson. "A week later, President Kennedy was dead."

He left the commission in 1965, when he joined several newsroom colleagues in founding Jabine, Yingling, Smith & Goff, a public relations firm with headquarters in the American National Building.

In 1969, Mr. Jabine left the public relations firm when he was named editor of the Seaford Leader & News in Seaford, Del. A year later, he joined the Department of Natural Resources, working for its secretary.

He retired in 1984.

The former Northwood resident, who had lived on Northbourne Road, had been an Annapolis resident for the past 50 years.

In his retirement, Mr. Jabine sat at his typewriter in a spare room working on his memoirs and newspaper op-ed pieces. He was a prolific contributor of letters to the editor on a variety of subjects, to which he added dashes of humor.

In a 1982 letter that was published in The Evening Sun, Mr. Jabine wanted to correct what he saw as a reporter's error: "Marilyn Monroe did not invent the sweater. Lana Turner did. Marilyn Monroe invented the calendar."

Mr. Jabine returned to his Boys' Latin School days in a whimsical 1988 op-ed piece published in The Evening Sun.

He recalled the futile efforts of William Morris, an English teacher, in eliminating "to get" from the language, which he thought was a "slothful, sloppy word."

 

(New 09-08-15)

Clan Boyd International

World War II (1939-1945)- J thru Z

BOYD,Thomas Ray
Torpedoman's Mate, First Class,U.S. Navy
United States Navy
Entered the Service from: Alabama
Died: April 19, 1946
Missing in Action or Buried at Sea
Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila,Philippines
Awards: Purple Heart
Son of Mr Joseph E. Boyd of Hazel Green, AL

(New 09-08-15)

 

Toledo submarine veterans a proud, tightknit group

BY JANET ROMAKER
BLADE STAFF WRITER

Toledo Base member Edward Simpson, 89, of Toledo, was a torpedo man aboard a submarine in the Pacific during World War II.

Toledo Base member Edward Simpson, 89, of Toledo, was a torpedo man aboard a submarine in the Pacific during World War II.
Enlarge

Toledo Base member Edward Simpson, 89, of Toledo, was a torpedo man aboard a submarine in the Pacific during World War II. He wanted a chance to serve aboard a submarine “just for the hell of it.”

Too, there was extra pay — hazardous-duty pay and sea-duty pay — for serving on a submarine, Mr. Simpson said.

George Shreffler of Gibsonburg, Toledo Base Commander, noted the vital importance of submarines to the defense of freedom, including submarine attacks critical to Americans fighting at Pearl Harbor. Ships were destroyed during the attack by the Japanese, but submarines were available for duty, he said, adding that submarines helped win the war — one reason it is an honor to serve aboard submarines yet to this day.

Contact Janet Romaker at: 419-724-6006 or jromaker@theblade.com.
Read more at http://www.toledoblade.com/Culture/2015/04/05/Toledo-submarine-veterans-a-proud-tightknit-group.html#t8yxg8uD4L4PZPdU.99

(New 09-08-15)

USS San Juan Crew Roster

B
 
NameRankService DatesDiv/
Sec
DutyBattle StationHometownContact
Brazil, Edward L.
 
TM2c44 - 45..Torpedo BatteryCenterville, CA brazilm@earthlink.net
D
back to top
NameRankService DatesDiv/
Sec
DutyBattle StationHometownContact
DeCounter, Leo F.
 
.3/42 - 10/45.TorpedomanTorpedomanRushville, IL karidrgn@comcast.

G
back to top

NameRankService DatesDiv/
Sec
DutyBattle StationHometownContact
Goldsworth, Gerald
 
.11/45 - 3/46OrdTorpedoman.West Sayville, NY.

M
back to top

NameRankService DatesDiv/
Sec
DutyBattle StationHometownContact
McMillan, Herbert
 
TM3c42? - 45?.Torpedoman.Unaka, NC

(New 09-08-15)

History of Platte County - by M. Curry

CHIEF TORPEDOMAN'S MATE ROBERT JOHN BROCKMAN

Sailor, Rest Your Oar

Robert John Brockman, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, United States Navy, was born in Leigh, Nebraska, on November 25, 1919, and met death aboard the submarine U.S.S. Trout when it was sunk in Pacific waters by the enemy in April, 1944.

Robert was the son of Ernest A. Brockman of Columbus, Nebraska, and Bess Klabens Brockman, deceased, and the grandson of Henry Brockman of Monroe, Nebraska. He had two brothers, Richard E. Brockman and Ralph Brockman, both in the United States Navy.

After the death of his mother, Robert John Brockman lived for a time near Monroe with his grandparents, and attended school there. He then transferred to the Omaha schools, where he was graduated from high school in 1938. After his graduation, he entered the United States Navy, and served for three years prior to World War II.

In cooperation with the crew of the submarine, U.S.S. Trout, during World War II, as chief torpedoman's mate, Robert J. Brockman rendered invaluable assistance to his commanding officer in the conduct of inshore attacks against the enemy. He was exceptionally skilled in maintaining torpedoes and torpedo tubes in a high state of readiness, and by his cool courage and aggressive determination, he contributed materially to the sinking of five enemy ships and the destruction of several thousand additional tons of enemy shipping, including a hostile aircraft carrier.

Chief Torpedoman's Mate Robert John Brockman lost his life aboard the submarine U.S.S. Trout, in April, 1944, when the submarine was sunk during battle in enemy-controlled waters of the Shino-Ashizuri Saki area.

His citations, awarded posthumously, included the Purple Heart, the facsimile and ribbon bar with star of the President's Unit Citation awarded to the submarine U.S.S. Trout for outstanding performance in combat during numerous highly successful patrols in enemy waters, and the Bronze Star medal.

Chief Torpedoman's Mate Robert John Brockman was a member of the Lutheran Church. He was baptized in Columbus by Reverend Richard Neumarker.

(New 09-08-15)

 

VETERANS OF WORLD WAR II From Crittenden County, Kentucky
A local group is trying to compile a complete list of all Crittenden County veterans who served during World War II. If you know anyone from Crittenden County whose name is not on this list, contact Lucy Tedrick at 965-3269. If there are any names spelled incorrectly or where middle names are omitted, please advise. You may also email updates to sislucy@pngusa.net

Walker, Doyle O.  Torpedoman 3/C   Navy 1943-46  Submarine  in the
            Atlantic Fleet  

(New 09-07-15)

Wreaths Across America

  Memory Wall D 4

Dudley Overmyer torpedo man 2nd class NAVY

Donald E. Mills Navy WWII Torpedo Man Striker 3rd Class

See more at: http://www.wreathsacrossamerica.org/memory-wall-d/#sthash.3haLyqQX.dpuf

(New 09-07-15)

 

CAVALLA'S CREWS
World War II Roster

Hoyt S. "Pappy" Greeson, TMC, Chief of the Boat

(New 09-06-15)

Silent Hunter header

 

  Bibliography

Books

Schultz, Robert and James Shell. We Were Pirates: A Torpedoman's Pacific War. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2009.

Documentary Film & Video

Interviews with Robert Hunt, Torpedoman, USS Tambor - 12 War Patrols. 2009. Interviews conducted by Robert Schultz.

(New 09-06-15)

Torpedoman’s Mate 2nd Class James E. Carawan, U.S.N.R., wounded,
Mr. and Mrs. Grover Cleveland Carawan, parents, 712 W. Mala St., Belhaven

(New 09-06-15)

Two torpedoes being fired by PT  Boat

(New 09-02-15)

WORLD WAR II

NAVY, MARINE CORPS AND COAST GUARD

RELEASED FROM PRISON CAMPS

Source: State Summary of War Casualties from World War II for Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard Personnel from Kansas, 1946

North, Sylvester Farrington, Torpedoman's Mate 1c USN. Parents Mr. and Mrs. John Thomas North, 510 N. Madison St., Junction City

Thompson, Wendell Dwyer, Torpedoman's Mate 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Thompson, W. 5th, Garnett

 (New 08-06-15)

 

USN Torpedoman Charlie John Buresh, Caldwell: Sept. 21, 1924 – June 5, 2015

June 07, 2015   Cueball

Sailor Rest Your Oar

 (added jpg photo on 12-18-15)

Charles Buresh

http://www.sumnernewscow.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Charles-Buresh-web-photo.jpg  

Charlie John Buresh, of Caldwell died Friday, June 5, 2015 at the Golden Living Center in Wellington at the age of 90 years.

Charlie was born the son of Charles and Anna Cadek Buresh, on Sunday, September 21, 1924 in Caldwell.

He grew up on a farm west of Caldwell, where he farmed until retirement.  He was a 1942 graduate of Caldwell High School. 

He served in the United States Navy from August 1943 to April 1946.  He was active duty on the U.S.S.Thornback as a torpedo man.

Survivors include his nephew, Gale Wyckoff (Connie) of Wellington, niece Janie Ward (Jody) of Benton and several great nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents and sisters, Adeline Liska and Rose (Dolly) Wyckoff.

Memorials may be given in memory of Charlie to the Czechoslovakian Cemetery, Caldwell.

A graveside service will be held 11 a.m. Tuesday, June 9, 2015 at the Czechoslovakian Cemetery, Caldwell.

To share a memory or leave a condolence please visit www.schaeffermortuary.info

Arrangements by Schaeffer Mortuary, 6 N. Main, Caldwell.

Posted in: Obituaries

 (New 07-19-15)

New York
World War II Honor List
US Army & US Army Air Force - Dead and Missing
US Navy, US Marine Corps and US Coast Guard - Dead, Missing, POW and Wounded

Last Names Beginning with 'A'

Name   

ID Number

   Rank

Branch

Regiment   

 

Death/Wound

Death

Page

Cemetery Name

County

      

Next of Kin

Andrews, David J.

 

Torpedoman's Mate 1st class

Navy

 

POW: Released from Prison Camps

 

179

 

Oswego

 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Andrews, Parents; 110 East Seneca St.; Oswego

 (New 07-19-15)

New York
World War II Honor List
US Army & US Army Air Force - Dead and Missing
US Navy, US Marine Corps and US Coast Guard - Dead, Missing, POW and Wounded

Last Names Beginning with 'D'

Name   

ID Number

   Rank

Branch

Regiment   

 

Death/Wound

Death

Page

Cemetery Name

County

      

Next of Kin

Dallessandro, Vincent Louis

 

Torpedoman's Mate 1st Class

Navy

 

Dead

 

16

 

Erie

Mrs Lucy Mary Dallesandro, wife; 346 Pennsylvania St; Buffalo

Donovan, Thomas Armstrong

 

Torpedoman's Mate 2nd Class

Navy

 

Dead

 

19

 

  Steuben

 

Mrs Catherine Woodworth, mother; Rt 1; Hornell

 (New 07-19-15)

 

New York
World War II Honor List
US Army & US Army Air Force - Dead and Missing
US Navy, US Marine Corps and US Coast Guard - Dead, Missing, POW and Wounded

Last Names Beginning with 'E'

Name   

ID Number

   Rank

Branch

Regiment   

 

Death/Wound

Death

Page

Cemetery Name

County

      

Next of Kin

Eastman, Alton George Harlan

 

Torpedoman's Mate 1st Class

Navy

 

Dead

 

21

 

Chenango

Mrs Marion T Ellsworth, mother; 50 N Canal St; Greene

Echorst, Ernest Lee

 

Torpedoman's Mate 2nd Class

Navy

 

Dead

 

21

 

Tioga

Mr & Mrs Fred A Echorst, parentsRichford

Edwards, James Jr

 

Torpedoman's Mate 3rd Class

Navy

 

Dead

 

22

 

New York

Mr James Edwards, Sr, father; 323 E 47th St; New YorkEllis, Homer Hugh Jr

Ellis, Homer Hugh Jr

 

Torpedoman's Mate 3rd Class

Naval Reserve

 

Dead

 

21

 

Chautauqua

Mr Homer Hall Ellis, Sr, father; 185 Central Ave; Fredonia

Evans, Roger M.

 

Torpedoman's Mate 3rd class

Navy

 

POW: Released from Prison Camps

 

17

 

Onondaga

Mrs. Pearl Evans, Mother; 906 2nd St.; Liverpool

 (New 07-19-15)

 (added jpg photo on 12-18-15)

PHOTOS OF THE MEN

Eads, Allen L

War: World War II, 1939-1946; Korean War, 1950-1955
Branch: Navy
Unit: USS Yarnell (DD 143), USS Ranger (CV 4); USS Cushing (DD 376); USS Porter (DD 386); USS Dalton; USS Colorado (BB 45); USS San Francisco (CA 38); USS Miles C. Fox (DD 829); USS Wake Island (CVE 65)
Service Location: Pacific; Rapid City, South Dakota; Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Atlantic; San Francisco and San Diego, California; Guadalcanal (Solomon Islands)
Highest Rank: Chief Torpedoman
Place of Birth: Burlington, IA

 

 (added jpg photo on 12-18-15)

 Charles Eads and Allen Eads in uniform standing together outside, Iowa
January 1943

 

 (added jpg photo on 12-18-15)

 

Allen L. Eads in uniform standing on a sidewalk
1945

 (added jpg photo on 12-18-15)

Allen L. Eads wearing his Navy Chief uniform in his home, Mountain Home, Arkansas 2003

 (New 05-26-15)

Allen L. Eads Collection

Chief Torpedoman's Mate

Name:

 Allen L. Eads 

State of Birth: 

IA 

Home State: 

AR

Gender 

Male 

Race 

Unspecified 

War or Conflict 

World War, 1939-1945 

Military Status 

Veteran 

Dates of Service 

1934-1957 

Entrance into Service 

Enlisted 

Branch of Service 

Navy 

Unit of Service 

USS Yarnell (DD 143); USS Ranger (CV 4); USS Cushing (DD 376); USS Porter (DD 386); USS Dalton; USS Colorado (BB 45);  USS San Francisco (CA 38); USS Miles C. Fox (DD 829); USS Wake Island (CVE 65) 

Location of Service  

Pacific; Rapid City, South Dakota; Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Atlantic; San Francisco and San Diego, California; Guadalcanal (Solomon Islands)

 

Battles/Campaigns

Guadalcanal

Highest Rank

Chief Torpedoman's Mate

Prisoner of War

Unknown 

War or Conflict

Korean War, 1950-1953

Military Status

Veteran

Entrance into Service

enlisted

Prisoner of War

Unknown

 (New 05-25-15)

 

Hal Hunter Dupuy, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

Sailor Rest Your Oar

 

 (added jpg photo on 12-18-15) 

Milton E. Merritt Sr.

torpedoman's Mate

sailor Rest your Oar

   
Milton E. Merritt Sr., 85, who lived a wonderful life 29 Palms, Calif., died Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011, at 29 Palms. Milton E. Merritt Sr. was born Dec. 20, 1925, in Le Mars. He was a member of the class of 1943 at Le Mars High School. Milt began his military career in World War II as a Navy torpedoman. ...

 (added jpg photo on 12-17-15)

WWII Casualties BURIED OUTSIDE FAYETTE COUNTY

Edgar L. Schmidt

Sailor Rest Your Oar

Torpedoman's Mate, Second Class, U.S. Navy

05763780

United States Naval Reserve

Died: January 16, 1946

Missing in Action or Buried at Sea

Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery

Manila, Philippines

 (New 05-25-15)

   DU VETERANS - FRONT AND CENTER!

Doyle O. Walker,Torpedoman 3/C 

Walker, Doyle O.  Torpedoman 3/C   Navy 1943-46  Submarine in the Atlantic Fleet  

 (New 05-25-15)

Cecil Sturm - Chief Torpedoman

Cecil Sturm - Chief Torpedoman, Navy, Pacific Theatre, USS Yorktown, USS Wailer, First World War II Purple Heart in Calhoun County.

 (New 05-25-15)

Kentucky WW2 NMCG Casualty List – B Surnames

James Crosier BLAIR, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

 BLAIR, James Crosier, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Blair, Clarkson.

 (New 05-25-15)

Vito P. Milano, Torpedoman's Mate 2nd Class

Sailor Rest Your Oar

 (added jpg photo on 12-18-15)

Aviation Cadet Anthony W. Milano, 23, son of Mrs. Grace Milano of Camillus, was killed in the crash of an airplane at Minter Field, Bakersfield, California. Mrs. Milano was notified of the death of her son yesterday.

AC Milano has two brothers in the service, Pfc. Joseph Milano of Homestead, Florida, and S 1c Vito Milano overseas. (12/18/44)

Vito P. Milano, a graduate of Solvay High School served in the Navy as a Torpedoman's Mate 2nd Class.

After the war he was a self-employed carpenter for 55 years. he died in 2006 at the age of 82, survived by his wife, the former Irene Ksviek.

 (New 05-25-15) 

LONOKE COUNTY OBITUARIES - Month of April, 1998

William Fred "Bill" Wilson torpedoman first class on the USS Phillip 

LONOKE -- William Fred "Bill" Wilson, 77, of Lonoke, died April 17, 1998. He was born February 5, 1921, in Lonoke County to the late Charles W. Wilson and Bealie Wilson.  He was a retired farmer and a WWII Navy Veteran (torpedoman first class on the USS Phillip).  '

He was a member of the Lonoke Baptist Church.   

He loved to fish and spend time at Greer's Ferry Lake.

   Mr. Wilson is survived by his wife of 46 years, Joyce Wilson; a daughter, Emily Roberts; a son and daughter-in-law, Page and Cary
Wilson; grandchildren, Greg Horness, Alison Roberts, Ian Wilson and Mary Elizabeth Wilson, all of Lonoke.  He is also survived  by two sisters, Flora Morrow of Lonoke and Goldie Compton of Little Rock; and a brother, Joe Wilson of Lonoke.

   Services will be 10 a.m. Monday, April 20, 1998, at Boyd Funeral Home Chapel.  Interment will be at Lonoke Cemetery by Boyd Funeral Home of Lonoke.  In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Arkansas Cancer Research Center or your favorite charity.  Family will receive friends at their home at 619 College Street, Lonoke. 

Visitation begins at the  funeral home at 1 p.m. today (19 Apr 1998).

 (New 05-25-15)

CHIEF TORPEDOMAN'S MATE ROBERT JOHN BROCKMAN

Sailor Rest Your Oar

Robert John Brockman, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, United States Navy, was born in Leigh, Nebraska, on November 25, 1919, and met death aboard the submarine U.S.S. Trout when it was sunk in Pacific waters by the enemy in April, 1944.

Robert was the son of Ernest A. Brockman of Columbus, Nebraska, and Bess Klabens Brockman, deceased, and the grandson of Henry Brockman of Monroe, Nebraska. He had two brothers, Richard E. Brockman and Ralph Brockman, both in the United States Navy.

After the death of his mother, Robert John Brockman lived for a time near Monroe with his grandparents, and attended school there. He then transferred to the Omaha schools, where he was graduated from high school in 1938. After his graduation, he entered the United States Navy, and served for three years prior to World War II.

In cooperation with the crew of the submarine, U.S.S. Trout, during World War II, as chief torpedoman's mate, Robert J. Brockman rendered invaluable assistance to his commanding officer in the conduct of inshore attacks against the enemy. He was exceptionally skilled in maintaining torpedoes and torpedo tubes in a high state of readiness, and by his cool courage and aggressive determination, he contributed materially to the sinking of five enemy ships and the destruction of several thousand additional tons of enemy shipping, including a hostile aircraft carrier.

Chief Torpedoman's Mate Robert John Brockman lost his life aboard the submarine U.S.S. Trout, in April, 1944, when the submarine was sunk during battle in enemy-controlled waters of the Shino-Ashizuri Saki area.

His citations, awarded posthumously, included the Purple Heart, the facsimile and ribbon bar with star of the President's Unit Citation awarded to the submarine U.S.S. Trout for outstanding performance in combat during numerous highly successful patrols in enemy waters, and the Bronze Star medal.

Chief Torpedoman's Mate Robert John Brockman was a member of the Lutheran Church. He was baptized in Columbus by Reverend Richard Neumarker.

 (New 05-23-15)

Jesse Kohler Torpedoman's Mate
Sailor Rest Your Oar


1925 - 2015 | Obituary Condolences

 (added jpg photo on 12-18-15)

Jesse Schuylar Kohler (Jack), 89, peacefully passed away on Monday February 23, 2015 at the Bruce McCandless Colorado Veterans Community Living Center in Florence. Jack was born in the village of Quinlin Oklahoma, a small country town that no longer exists, on July 21, 1925. After high school, Jack would spend three years in the United States Navy, where he worked as a Torpedoman's Mate. After successfully serving his country during World War II, Jack was honorably discharged in April of 1946. Less than a full year after his separation from the military, Jesse went on to marry the love of his life, Erma Amy Hopkins. The two of them were married

- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/canoncitydailyrecord/obituary.aspx?n=jesse-kohler&pid=174272429&#sthash.sbLluaUA.dpuf

 (New 05-23-15)

James Thomas Soulis Chief Torpedoman

 (added jpg photo on 12-18-15)

I obtained these items last year on e-bay. Reference is made to a post on this forum for James Soulis and the

USS Halibut on 03 FEB 2013, (WWII USN Submarine Officer’s Silver Star Group, USS Spearfish). James

Thomas Soulis served in the U.S. Navy during WWII. He served on the USS Detroit (CL-8), USS Hoe (SS-

258), USS Halibut (SS-232) and the USS Sea Poacher (SS-406). He was the Chief Torpedoman (CTM) during

his assignment on the USS Halibut.

 In August 1943, the USS Halibut went on its 6th war patrol off the east coast of Japan’s two major islands,

Honshu and Hokkaido. Soulis was part of the forward torpedo room crew. The other crew members were

Torpedoman 1c Emil Ade, Jack Perkins, and Ed Bertheau. The aft torpedo room was manned by Torpedoman

1c A.J. Dusty Racine, Grover S. (Sam) McLeod, Tudor Fred Davis, and Robert K. Warren (Take Her Deep, pg.

CTM Soulis is recognized for his valor during the USS Halibut’s 10th war patrol, which started on October 10,

1944. “Chief Soulis and his gang reacted instantly to the chaos in their space. They closed valves, tightened

hatch dogs, took up on loose bolts, cleared away loose gear and searched for damage”. (Take Her Deep, pg.

239). A U.S. Navy memorandum describes his efforts on Halibut’s 10th patrol as…his professional skill and

devotion to duty resulted in his being awarded the Bronze Star Medal. Soulis was the Petty Officer in charge of

the forward torpedo room on the Halibut for three (3) war patrols and in addition fulfilled the duties of control

room chief of the watch on one (1) patrol; while performing these duties he displayed the highest caliber of

ability and leadership. CTM Soulis’ military awards included the following: Bronze Star Medal (V), Navy Unit

Citation (1) Star, American Defense (1) Star, American Theater Asiatic Pacific (2) Stars, Philippine Liberation

(1) Star, Good Conduct (1) Star and World War II Victory Ribbon.

 (New 05-21-15)

Jack Duncan PT Boat Ambassador Torpedoman 3/c of PT103

 (added jpg photo on 12-18-15)

Master Chief Jack talks shop with Pres. Maury Hooper

Jack Duncan (aka Dryfrog, Neanderthal Jack, or just plain Master Chief Gunners Mate) showed up in Portland last June and took the PT658 over by storm! It seems the former Torpedoman 3/c of PT103, who went on to become a Navy Frogman then a Navy Special Forces SEAL Masterchief  and Vietnam PTF operator, is a veteran of 3 wars (WW2, Korea and Vietnam) and is a prolific writer to boot! Jack regaled the crew with his numerous yarns, and was on hand to greet the US Navy Admirals that came aboard the PT658 to give them some real “that’s how it was back on the PT Boats” flavor. Jack was present on every underway trip for the 2011 Rose Festival Fleet Week, (Weds, Thurs. Fri Sat & Sun) He made every trip, something that is quite remarkable for a young 87 year old! Jack and his wonderful wife, the marvelous Marlene, have promised to return for the 2012 Rose Festival and we are all anxiously awaiting his return! Recently, he wrote a testimonial called “An appeal for a WW2 Veteran” that was posted on our website under “News”. Read it for yourself and see what you think!  See you soon Jack!

 (New 05-21-15)

John W. Close

 (added jpg photo on 12-18-15)
 

John Close [2003]

 

War: World War, 1939-1945
Branch: Navy
Unit: Submarine Service; V-12 Program
Service Location: Great Lakes, Illinois; Newport, Rhode Island; San Diego, Advance Submarine School, California; Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Warrensburg, Missouri; Iowa
Rank: Torpedoman's Mate Third Class
 

Complete Interview  (47 min.)

As a 19-year-old in September 1942, John Close tried to enlist in the Navy, but his father would not sign the papers for him until John threatened to join the Merchant Marine. Once in the Navy, he volunteered for submarine duty and was accepted on his third attempt. Eventually, he was stationed in Pearl Harbor, maintaining submarines which had come in from patrol. His expertise was in cleaning, painting, and adjusting torpedoes, and though he never got go out on patrol, his descriptions of how submarines and their favorite weapons work are concise and invaluabl

.Video (Interview Excerpts) (6 items) 

 

Volunteering for submarine school in Newport, Rhode Island; easier to get in than to stay; learning about torpedoes; doing well in training also helped transform his introverted personality. (01:44)

Sub school in San Diego was six weeks, three in the classroom, three at sea in old S boats from the 1920s; difference between older subs and the new models, which for starters can dive much deeper; recommends the book Blind Man’s Bluff for information on the Cold War underwater chess games between American and Soviet subs. (02:18)

Maintaining the old submarines required being a contortionist to get into and out of very small spaces; getting stuck once when his body swelled up because of the heat; a fan was brought in to cool him down. (02:28)

After attack on Pearl Harbor, except for submarines, destroyers, a couple of carriers, a few cruisers, that was it, our entire attack force at sea; ironic that the attack on Pearl Harbor ignored the subs, which wound up responsible for over 50% of Japanese ships that were sunk;in early 1944, Pearl seemed packed with ships and then one morning, they were all gone, off in a flotilla to take the Gilbert Islands. (02:37)

Stationed in Hawaii, refurbishing subs as they came in from patrol; eager to get on a sub but accepting his status; explaining the mechanics of a submarine's ability to dive; rehabbing subs for different purposes: range vs. ability to dive quickly; hazards of working with creosote; how torpedoes are set for direction and depth; torpedoes used in greater numbers earlier in the war than later, when there were fewer targets. (06:40)

In favor of compulsory national service for all; would instill discipline that he sees is lacking; submarines illustrate need for discipline and responsibility; believes the disappearance of the S-28 off Hawaii with all hands on July 4, 1944 was connected with someone not doing his job correctly. (02:15)

 (New 05-21-15)

Henry Kenneth Adcock

Sailor Rest Your Oar

(added jpg photo on 12-18-15)
 

U. S. Navy Torpedoman's Mate Third Class Henry Kenneth Adcock was the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Wade Adcock of Route 1, Parkdale.

His official death date was October 26, 1945, and he is listed as missing at the memorial at Fort William McKinley at Manila in the Phillippines. He received the Purple Heart.

 (New 05-20-15)

Jack Roche Torpedoman 3rd Class

Veterans remembered in Scranton Armed Forces Parade

JON O'CONNELL, STAFF WRITER

Published: May 17, 2015

As the marching bands, military vehicles and hot rods passed, Jack Roche stood stoically, watching the parade from the curb on North Washington Avenue.

“Thanks for your service, sir,” a woman yelled to him from the back of a pickup truck.

Mr. Roche wasn’t a part of Scranton’s Armed Forces Parade on Saturday morning, but his jacket and ball cap, emblazoned with lettering identifying him as a submariner, let everyone know he was part of the reason they were having it.

Mr. Roche, 90, served as a torpedoman 3rd class on the USS Ice Fish from 1943 to 1946 in the Pacific Ocean. He served in Pearl Harbor as well as the South China Sea, and his crew was responsible for sinking two Japanese ships, he said proudly.

“It’s nice to see how people acknowledge it every year,” Mr. Roche said, looking out toward the procession.

About 75 marching bands, veterans organizations and civic groups as well as emergency first responders were represented in the procession.

The parade route was lined with people from its start at the Gino Merli Veterans Center, down Penn Avenue to Lackawanna Avenue, and then up to North Washington Avenue, where it ended beyond the courthouse. They waved small flags, and children scurried out to snatch candy and toys thrown from the passing procession.

Gianella Bruckner, 3, of Throop, watched with her mom, Erika, waving a flag and catching candy.

“This was to say ‘thank you’ to all the soldiers,” Mrs. Bruckner told her little girl, who squirmed in her mother’s arms.

Joseph Weber, a 17-year-old Boy Scout from Dunmore Troop 66, stood with other Scouts at the parade’s edge in full uniform watching as it passed.

“I think of a parade as a way to honor people who served the country, to thank them for their service,” he said. “If it wasn’t for them, we wouldn’t be here.”

Contact the writer:

joconnell@timesshamrock.com ,

@jon_oc on Twitter

 (New 05-20-15)

The Loss of USS Cochino (SS-345)

Chief Torpedoman’s Mate Hubert H. Rauch & Torpedoman’s Mate Raymond Reardon

Wednesday, August 25, 2010 12:00 PM

On the morning of 25 August 1949, during a training cruise north of the Arctic Circle, the submarine Cochino (SS-345), in company with Tusk (SS-426), attempted to submerge to snorkel depth in the Barents Sea, but the crashing waves played havoc with these efforts. At 1048, a muffled thud rocked Cochino and news of a fire in the after battery compartment quickly passed through the boat. A second explosion soon followed and CDR Rafael Benitez, the commanding officer, ordered all of the crew not on watch or fighting fires topside. During this orderly evacuation, however, Seaman J. E. Morgan fell overboard. The 48° water and the swells created by the 20 to 25 mph winds rapidly exhausted the sailor, so Chief Torpedoman’s Mate Hubert H. Rauch dove into the chilly sea to keep him afloat before Culinary Specialist Clarence Balthrop pulled him to safety.

At 1123, another explosion badly burned LCDR Richard M. Wright, the executive officer, and left him temporarily in a state of shock, as he moved to sever the connection between the after and forward batteries on board Cochino to stem the generation of dangerous hydrogen gas. Thanks in part to a safety line run by LT (j.g.) Charles Cushman, Jr., by 1208, 60 men huddled, cold and wet, on the bridge and deck of the submarine. Almost all of them had not had time to dress properly for the stormy weather. It was no better for those who remained below, as men began to pass out from the gas and toxic smoke. At 1230, Tusk attempted to come alongside, but the swells and wind made this nearly impossible, but she did manage to send needed medical supplies to Cochino by raft.

 CDR Benitez decided that he needed get word of the dire conditions on board to Tusk and the Commander, Submarine Development Group Two. Aware of the perils that awaited him, ENS John Shelton agreed to make the attempt as did a civilian engineer on board, Mr. Robert Philo. After receiving confirmation of Philo’s desire to make the journey, CDR Benitez ordered the men lowered into the angry sea, but their raft immediately overturned. Sailors from Tusk pulled Shelton and Philo alongside as they desperately clung to the raft, but the waves that swept across the submarine prevented them being brought on board. Seaman Norman Walker jumped into water to help both men onto Tusk, but not before the waves slammed Philo’s head against the hull. By this time, fifteen men from that submarine stood on the deck handling lines and attempting to resuscitate Philo, when an unusually large wave broke one of the lifelines and swept eleven members of the Tusk crew and the still unconscious Philo overboard. In addition to Philo, the sea claimed the lives of six of Tusk’s crew including Electrician’s Mate John Guttermuth whose inflatable life jacket had burst upon hitting the water which left only his boots inflated as he attempted to save the unconscious Fireman Robert F. Brunner, Jr. He fought desperately to keep his head above water, but eventually drowned in the frigid sea with his boots still visible above the water. A kinder fate awaited LT (j.g.) Philip Pennington when LCDR George Cook dove over the side to pluck him from the unruly waves. Of two life rafts thrown to those who been swept overboard, one was recovered empty, but the other contained Torpedoman’s Mate Raymond Reardon who suffered gravely from exposure to the elements. Engineman Henry McFarland entered the water but could not reach the raft then Seaman Raymond Shugar overcame the raging waters long enough to attach a line to Reardon who was subsequently rescued.

 By 1800, Cochino had regained power and signaled Tusk that she could make ten knots but had no steering. It appeared the crippled boat might make it back to Norway. However, at 2306 she suffered a fatal blow in the form of yet another battery explosion. Tusk loosed her ready torpedoes then transferred the 76 officers and men from the stricken submarine. CDR Benitez, the last to leave Cochino, departed only minutes before the boat slipped beneath the waves. These selfless acts of heroism provide an example of the dedication and comraderie that animates our submariners. Only their bravery and professionalism kept the tragic toll from being far higher.

 (New 05-20-15)

Raymond Charles Bunt

Chief Torpedoman and Master Diver

Sailor Rest Your Oar

July 4, 1923-Jan. 4, 2013

Resident of Cupertino.

Cupertino Death Notices: Jan. 4-7, 2013

Recent deaths of people associated with Cupertino.

Raymond Charles Bunt born with a big bang on July 4, 1923, joined his beloved wife of 64 years, Anna Barbara Bunt and son, James Richard Bunt on Jan. 4, 2013, in the eternal paradise where we will one day be together again. 

He leaves a treasure of loved ones including his children; Ann (Mike) Bunt Carter, Raymond Bunt, Jr. and Bobby (Janine) Bunt; grandchildren; Kendra, Christy, Konnie, Bill, Layna, Brian, Jamie, and Alison and 8 great-grandchildren.

In addition, many family friends who will continue to cherish this man and his legacy. In his youth he worked as a Captain for the Cleveland Lifeguards in charge of 40 guards while attending and graduating from Case Metallurgical College as a tool and die pattern maker.

In 1942, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy and served in both the Atlantic and Pacific fleet, on a submarine, as a Chief Torpedo man and Master Diver on the USS Sailfish. During his service he received a Letter of Commendation for rescuing seven downed airmen trapped in their planes beneath the ocean's surface and received a Presidential Unit Citation for his involvement in the sinking of the largest Japanese aircraft carrier.

Ray met the love of his life, Ann, and decided to give up the Navy. They married in 1946, and settled in Connecticut, beginning his career in sales and starting their family.

While advancing his career with John Hancock Life Insurance Co., he took his family to Massachusetts, Arizona and finally settled in Los Altos in 1961.

Here he became very involved in community service projects, including dedicating many years to his children's high school activities, which then lead him to his involvement in many political campaigns and his appointment as a California Senior Senator.

Family and friends meant everything to Ray. Known for his love of celebrating holidays and special occasions, his door was always open and everyone was always welcome. It simply was "THE PLACE TO BE"!

He was a mentor to many and all would agree he was "DAD" to everyone. Though he will be missed by all who knew him, we will carry on the lessons we have learned from him; the importance of love, family and acceptance of others; all of the things that are his legacy. Friends were invited to attend services beginning with a visitation on Jan. 11; a vigil service was also held followed by a funeral mass on Jan. 12.

Contributions in Ray's memory may be made to: Northern California Alzheimer's Association, 1060 La Avenida St., Mountain View, 94043.

 (New 05-20-15)

USS Neosho: Survivors and Casualties

M. Buonassissi

Torpedoman Second Class

Killed in action.*

Donald A. Davis

Torpedoman Second Class

Killed in action.*

James J. Edwards

Torpedoman Third Class

Killed in action.*

John Goldych

Torpedoman Second Class

Killed in action.*

Edward W. King

Chief Torpedoman

Killed in action.*

Francis F. Lynch

Torpedoman Third Class

Killed in action.*

Hoyt G. Matthews

Torpedoman Third Class

Killed in action.*

How Many Survived and How Many Died?

While researching the U.S.S. Neosho, I tried to determine the exact number of men stationed on the ship before the Battle of the Coral Sea (i.e. its complement) and the number of confirmed survivors, dead, and missing.  It was pretty frustrating, since the U.S. Navy records available on the Internet regarding this matter are sketchy at best, and other sources seemed to conflict each other.  I've relied primarily on the book, "Blue Skies and Blood," which includes the most detailed account of the Neosho at the Battle of the Coral Sea that I've found, but even this source had some apparent conflicts.  I think I've ironed it out, though.  

The book claims that there were 21 officers and 267 crewmen on board the Neosho during the attack on May 7, 1942.  According to the book, shortly after the dive-bombing attack on the afternoon of May 7, Captain Phillips did a head count and determined that there were 110 survivors from the Neosho and 20 Neosho crewmen confirmed dead.  Therefore, Phillips determined that 158 men were missing, many of whom had taken to the life rafts and were drifting away from the ship, all but four of whom were never seen again.  When the 15 survivors from the U.S.S. Sims were added to the 110 on board the Neosho, there were a total of 125 men on board the listing Neosho shortly after the attack (or in the boats which circled the Neosho that evening, afraid the ship would sink).

Furthermore, the book states that during the four days that the crewmen drifted on the Neosho until their rescue, from May 8 until May 11, a total of seven men died on the Neosho, including six Neosho crewmen and one from the Sims.  The book even states their names, so I'm pretty certain that seven men did indeed die during this time.  This would leave 118 survivors on the Neosho (125 minus 7) who were rescued by the U.S.S. Henley.  However, several sources state that the Henley actually rescued 123 men, not 118 men, from the Neosho.  Why was there a discrepancy of five men, I wondered?

All of the accounts that I've seen agree that 123 men were rescued off the Neosho by the Henley on May 11.  Therefore, I can only assume that there were 115 Neosho survivors of the Japanese attack on May 7, instead of 110.  When added to the 15 survivors of the Sims, this means that there were a total of 130 survivors on the Neosho shortly after the battle instead of 125, with 123 eventually surviving to be rescued by the Henley.

The inconsistency might be explained by a group of crewmen who had transferred from the Yorktown and cruiser Portland to the Neosho on May 6, just before the Neosho and Sims were detached from the rest of the fleet, as described in "Blue Skies and Blood" and verified by my uncle, Bill Leu, during his 2002 interview.  When Admiral Fletcher learned about the Japanese fleet northwest of him, he ordered the Neosho and Sims to the southwest while the rest of the fleet quickly sped towards the Japanese, leaving the Yorktown and Portland crewmen stranded on board the Neosho (the book doesn't explain why these crewmen transferred to the Neosho, although my uncle stated that they were heading back to Pearl Harbor).  I'm assuming, therefore, that 5 men from the Yorktown and Portland were aboard the Neosho during the attack and that these men were not included in the 110 survivors that Captain Phillips reported shortly after the attack.

Through deduction, Captain Phillips determined shortly after the attack that 158 men were missing.  It is likely that at least some of these men drowned that afternoon near the Neosho.  However, the Captain saw several life rafts with men aboard drift away from the Neosho in the four-foot seas and ordered a Neosho crewman in a motorized whaleboat to tow these rafts back to the Neosho, but for various reasons, the crewman failed to do so.  Neither Captain Phillips nor, presumably, the men on board these rafts considered their lives to be seriously at risk because, it was thought, the U.S. fleet would rescue them either that day, May 7, or the next day.  Of course, the men drifting away from the Neosho didn't realize that the Neosho had been transmitting incorrect coordinates via radio and that a search by a destroyer would commence that evening -- although 40 miles away.  Captain Phillips himself didn't realize this error until May 8, the day after the attack.  

Regarding the life rafts, which lacked motors, it's not known and most likely never will be known how many of the 158 missing men from the Neosho made their way onto rafts and drifted ever farther away from the mother ship, most never to be seen again.  Presumably, many of the men on rafts drifted across the Coral Sea and finally, after many days, succumbed from exposure and lack of water.  

The only information about any raft survivors came from the four men who were rescued from a life raft by the U.S.S. Helm on May 16, a full nine days after the Japanese attack.  According to these men, they were the only survivors from a group of 68 men who had drifted away from the Neosho in four rafts lashed together, truly an amazing story itself.  Unfortunately, two of these four men died shortly after being rescued.

 (New 05-20-15)

Floyd "Buddy" Lewis

Torpedoman

Floyd “Buddy” Lewis was born December 14, 1926 in Casa Blanca on the Gila River Indian Reservation. He spent much of his youth at Phoenix Indian School, where his father was a printing instructor. Buddy enlisted in the Navy in 1943 and was a torpedoman, serving in the South Pacific.

After World War II, he re-enlisted as an aerial photographer. He attended the US Naval School of Photography in Pensacola and played football for the Naval team there. Buddy served in Guam from 1947 to 1950 and was honorably discharged in 1951.

He then attended the University of New Mexico, where he took courses on rhetorical writing. Over the years Buddy worked in accounting in Chicago, as a corporate messenger in Phoenix, and as a clerk for Maricopa Community Colleges.

 He has since retired and returned to the Gila River Indian Reservation, where he currently lives.

 As a first cousin of the legendary Ira Hayes, Buddy was interviewed for the book, Flags of Our Fathers, on which the movie of the same name was based.

 (New 05-19-15)

Jerome S. Matuch

Torpedoman

Sailor Rest Your Oar

Date: October 2, 2011
Time: 2:30 PM
Name: Jerome S. Matuch

Comments: As Chaplain of The American Legion Post 1941, La Grange, Il. I had the honors of saying Post Everlasting prayers for Frederick Arthur Landbeck, veteran of the US Navy who served as Torpedoman aboard the submarine USS Batfish. He is now entured at Abraham Lincoln National cemetery in Elwood, Illinois.

 (New 05-19-15)

Cabot Star-Herald Obit Listings Wi To Wz

William Fred "Bill" Wilson, Torpedoman 1st Class

Sailor Rest Your Oar

William Fred "Bill" Wilson, 77, of Lonoke died April 17, 1998.

He was a retired farmer, and a World War II Navy veteran (Torpedoman 1st Class on the USS Phillip), He was a member of the Lonoke Baptist Church.

Survivors include his wife, Joyce Wilson; a daughter, Emily Roberts; a son, Cary Wilson; four grandchildren; two sisters, Flora Morrow of Lonoke and Goldie Compton of Little Rock; and a brother, Joe Wilson of Lonoke.

Funeral was April 20 at Boyd Funeral Home Chapel, with burial in Lonoke Cemetery.

Memorials may be made to the Arkansas Cancer Research Center, or a favorite charity.; csh4/22/98

 (New 05-19-15)

Harry G. Agnew 

Sailor Rest Your Oar
     PLAISTOW -- Harry G. Agnew, 78, formerly of Farrington Avenue, died
Monday, Jan. 28, 2002, at the Portland Care and Rehabilitation Center,
Portland, Conn.

     He was born in Haverhill, Mass. He had resided in Plaistow for 33
years.

     He attended St. James Grammar School and was a graduate of Haverhill
High School.

     He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II serving as a torpedoman's
mate and was a recipient of the Purple Heart.

     Mr. Agnew was a member of the Haverhill Fire Department and served
from 1946 until he was injured in the Washington Street Diner fire in 1954.
Following his retirement from the department in 1955 he was associated with
the former Keezer Manufacturing Co. of Plaistow and Agnew Maintenance Co.
of Haverhill.

     He was a longtime member of St. John the Baptist Parish of Haverhill;
the Lorraine Post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of Haverhill; and the
Hannah Duston Chapter of the Disabled American Veterans, serving as the
adjutant.

     He was active in Plaistow political circles and was a member of the
Democratic Committee.

     The widower of Virginia M. (Gianfriddo) Agnew, he is survived by one
son and his wife, Thomas H. and Karen Agnew of Haverhill; one daughter and
her husband, Patricia and Howard Bush of East Hampton, Conn.; three
grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; one brother, James Agnew of
Haverhill; two sisters, Jesse Wilson and Eleanor Lowe, both of Haverhill;
and several nieces and nephews.

     He was predeceased by one grandchild, Thomas H. Agnew Jr.
     Calling hours will be held Monday from 2 to 4 p.m. and from 7 to 9
p.m. at Brookside Chapel & Funeral Home, 116 Main St., Plaistow.
     Funeral services with fire department honors will be held Tuesday at 9
a.m. in the funeral home, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m.
in St. John the Baptist Church, Lincoln Ave., Haverhill.

Burial will be in St. Patrick Cemetery, Haverhill.

     Memorial donations may be made to the Plaistow Firemen's Association,

27 Elm St., Plaistow, NH 03865.

 (New 05-19-15)

 Casualties from U.S.S. Sims  (Partial List)

 

Sailors Rest Your Oars

M. Buonassissi

Torpedoman Second Class

Killed in action.*

Donald A. Davis

Torpedoman Second Class

Killed in action.*

James J. Edwards

Torpedoman Third Class

Killed in action.*

John Goldych

Torpedoman Second Class

Killed in action.*

Edward W. King

Chief Torpedoman

Killed in action.*

Francis F. Lynch

Torpedoman Third Class

Killed in action.*

Hoyt G. Matthews

Torpedoman Third Class

Killed in action.*

 (New 05-19-15)

Submarine veteran Addison Skaggs leaves behind legacy, dozens of friends

Sailor Rest Your Oar
 

Kalhan Rosenblatt

7:36 PM, Apr 16, 2015

obituaries

Submarine veteran Addison Skaggs

Submarine veteran Addison Skaggs

Jim Albert, left and Submarine veteran Addison Skaggs

Submarine veteran Addison Skaggs

Jim Albert, left and Submarine veteran Addison Skaggs

It was raining in Washington, D.C., the day the third Honor Flight arrived from Naples.

Tiny pellets tapped the top of the umbrella Jim Albert held over wheelchair-bound Addison Skaggs as they looked out at the National World War II Memorial.

“Are you OK?” Albert asked. 

Skaggs didn’t respond, but the tears began to stream down his cheeks. 

Afterward, on the bus ride back, the 92-year-old Skaggs held Albert’s hand and told him how important it was that he had been given the chance to make the trip to D.C. 

On Monday, Addison Skaggs, a World War II Navy veteran responsible for neutralizing six Japanese war ships, died of complications from pneumonia. He was 93 years old. 

Skaggs was born in Leavenworth, Kansas to Joseph and Margaret Skaggs. 

Joseph Skaggs was a medical examiner for the Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary, and as a child Addison Skaggs would help his father transport executed prisoners to the morgue up until Joseph died when Addison was 14. 

When he graduated high school, Addison Skaggs enrolled in the University of Southern California. 

After two years at USC, in 1942, Skaggs was drafted to serve in World War II and joined the Navy. During boot camp he was turned on to the idea of attending submarine school and after volunteering himself, became a Torpedoman Third Class aboard the USS Balao. 

“(The USS Balao was) equipped with a bunch of dud torpedoes,” Albert said. “So they would (launch) and he’d hear a big thud. He was frustrated until they perfected torpedoes in 1943.” 

Once the torpedo was perfected, Skaggs and his sub were a force to be reckoned with. He and his shipmates were responsible for taking out six Japanese war ships, and Skaggs considered his service aboard the USS Balao to be his greatest accomplishment. 

“(After the war) most people went back to their lives,” Albert said. “They didn’t realize they were heroes. They just knew they kept oppressive individuals like Hitler from taking over the U.S. and it worked.” 

After the war, Skaggs went back to USC and eventually attended American Institute of Foreign Trade in Phoenix, Arizona. 

After going into export sales with Hobart Manufacturing and eventually Pitney-Bowes, Skaggs traveled the globe and even met his wife Dorothy while traveling abroad. Together the couple had one daughter, Lisa. 

After retiring, Addison and Dorothy Skaggs spent many years living and loving in Naples. She died in 2012. 

“He told me all the time ‘I should’ve found paradise sooner,’” Albert said. “He loved the people that he met … He made so many friends so quickly.” 

Albert and Skaggs met two years ago when the U.S. Submarine Veterans Inc. formed the organization’s Naples Base — the 167th base to form in the U.S. 

“He was my second dad,” Albert said. “He was oldest and most cherished submarine veteran because he was qualified in 1942. We became very close friends.” 

Albert and Skaggs spent as much time as they could together, talking daily on the phone, driving around Naples or going to lunch. 

“He had an infectious smile. Everyone will use that term to describe him,” Albert said. “When he smiled at you his face lit up and people will always remember that about him. He was never seen without a smile. 

When the third Honor Flight rolled around Skaggs needed a guardian in order to fly. 

“So I said ‘how would you like me to go with you?’ ” Albert said. “And he said ‘absolutely.’ ” 

Despite all the time they spent together, that trip is now Albert’s most cherished memory with Skaggs. 

But Albert still remembers how Skaggs face would light up any time they were out in Naples, and Skaggs saw a fellow veteran. 

“When he saw a veteran he’d have a smile ear to ear,” Albert said. “… He came from the greatest generation of people who grew up during the Great Depression, the biggest War in U.S. history and still came out with a smile … what a human being.” 

Addison Skaggs will be remembered in a private service Friday, before he is laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery. 

 (New 05-19-15)

Red McClosky, Torpedoman.

Texas Veterans of D-Day honored in France

This Saturday, June 6th, marks the 65th anniversary of the D-Day invasion of Normandy. Two Texas veterans of that battle will fly from Houston to France today to receive the Legion of Honor from the French government. Later, they'll participate in a ceremony with President Obama and French president Nicolas Sarkozy. Both veterans shared their experiences with KUHF's Melissa Galvez.

By: Melissa Galvez, June 04th, 2009 09:00 AM

"This is a picture looking at the boat, here's the charthouse, here's the 37 mm gun on the bow..."

Clyde Combs, who's from Houston, is showing me a picture of the exact boat he rode on, 65 years ago.It's called PT-515, for "patrol torpedo", but they also called it "Boomerang" Because they always come back.

"This is our radioman, Bill Tims, and Bigler, and Red McClosky, he was our torpedoman..."

In June 1944, Allied forces came ashore on the beaches of Normandy.The PT boats' job was to guard the English Chanel, ready to torpedo German ships.ξ Combs, who's 84, was there for D Day, and he stayed on patrol until the fall.ξ He is being honored in France this weekend.

"War is as near to hell, I suppose, as can be."

85 year old TerrellΠBoyd also remembers D-Day. As a member of the 359th Infantry, he plunged into the frigid water on June 6th, dodging underwater barbed wire, mines, and German machine gun fire to get to Utah beach.ξ And with all his gear, he could also have easily drowned:

"Look at it this way. You've got a 75 pound pack on your back. Then you've got an M1 rifle, you've got hand grenades strapped around your neck, criss-crossed, and, you also got a belt around your waist that's full of ammunition"

After crawling on his belly across the beach, he finally made it to the cliffs where they dug foxholes.ξ There they waited.

"I remember we were close enough to Germans sometimes at night, now they'd have head count, and I could hear them calling these people's names, that's how close we were."

Boyd spent his 21st birthday in a foxhole. He recalls that his good friend Arthur Hunter crawled out of his foxhole to come wish him happy birthday.Boyd was touched, but wished his friend hadn't been so reckless.ξ That was the last time he saw him.

These are the kinds of stories that Boyd and Combs will re-live when they visit Normandy this weekend, receive honors, and meet presidents and prime ministers. Combs will give a short speech where he plans to remind Americans of why it's important to remember not just this D-Day, but all days of sacrifice in war:

"We had other D-Days.ξ The D-Day on Iwo Jima, the D Day on Tarwa where we lost so many young American boys, and we need to perpetuate these memories for future generations"

From the KUHF NewsLab, I'm Melissa Galvez

 

 (New 05-18-15)

Torpedoman 2nd class John Day

 Savoy IL Navy 

(New 05-18-15)

Roger Zizelman TM2 (Torpedoman Second Class) served on a Nuclear Sub

Three United States Navy Brothers from Celina - All Vietnam Veterans - Roger Zizelman TM2 (Torpedoman Second Class) served on a Nuclear Sub, Marvin Zizelman EN2 (Engineman Second Class) served on a Destroyer, Rex Zizelman BT2 (Boiler Technician Second Class) served on a Destroyer

(New 05-18-15)

Torpedoman First Class Charles "Pops" Gibson

Crewmember's Grandaughter Visits

 (added jpg photo on 12-19-15)

 Karen Cline of Washington state, recently visited USS Razorback. Her grandfather was Torpedoman First Class Charles "Pops" Gibson aboard Razorback when she was commissioned in 1944.

FIXED LINK ON 12-19-15
According to his granddaughter, Petty Officer Gibson (in the circle), was called "Pops" because he was the oldest enlisted man on Razorback.
 
Petty Officer Gibson was from Washington State, where his widow, Louise, as well as his daughter Judy , granddaughter Karen, and grandson KC still live. A son, C. Martin resides in California. Two other grandsons, Chip and Andrew, live in Colorado and California respectively.

It's wonderful that Razorback crewmembers and their families continue to contribute their personal stories. They really make our museum come alive.

(New 05-18-15) 

John Fankhouser 

John is a native Washingtonian and prior to WW II John worked in the forest logging industry for a number of years and was a choke setter for six years. He learned, however, that the life expectancy of a choke setter was six years and figured it was time to get out of that profession. John enlisted in 1941 right after the Pearl Harbor attack.

 After boot camp and Torpedoman school in San Diego, John volunteered for submarine service, was assigned to the USS Porpoise, one of the last riveted hull submarines. On patrol Porpoise was damaged by depth charges, the riveted fuel oil tanks started leaking leaving tale tell oil slicks.

 She was sent to the yards for repair and then back into action. Depth charged again, she again started leaking oil, so on return to port, the Navy decided to take the Porpoise out of action and use her for a school boat. John remained with Porpoise until the war ended. He left the Navy as a first class Torpedoman after the war.

John was a painter during his civilian work life. John is an active member of Lockwood Chapter, USSV WW-II and a plank owner of SEATTLE BASE, USSVI. He lives in Seattle with his constant companion Goldie, his Golden Retriever.

(New 05-18-15)

Oral Hull Board and Friends Honor 50 Year Veteran-George Morgan

In 1944, he left high school and joined the Navy Submarine Service as a torpedo man

April 20, 2013 – Board members and friends of 50 year Oral Hull Foundation for the Blind, and past board member, George L. Morgan was recognized at a luncheon in his honor. More than 50 people attended the event.

George began in 1964 as an unpaid volunteer and has served without interruption since then as Board member, Treasurer, President and now as Assistant Treasurer. He is a leader, a mentor and an inspiration to those many decades younger and adds even more diversity to our Executive Committee. George brings Native American heritage to our board.

His accomplishments include spearheading development of our facilities including the creation of the ADA-accessible O’Keefe Memorial Garden. He also chaired a multi-agency effort creating Summer Camps for people with autism at Oral Hull Foundation for the Blind. More than 260 persons were served in a three-year span. In fitting tribute to his accomplishments, our recreation building was named Morgan Hall in his honor in 2008.

George was born in southwest Washington and spent much of his youth in Springfield, Oregon on farms
or in logging camps.In 1944, he left high school and joined the Navy Submarine Service as a torpedo man . He served in combat in the South Pacific. When he returned to Portland after World War II, he entered the insurance field and rose to become a partner in Walrad Insurance in Gresham from which he retired in 1989.

Among other activities, he has served for many years on the Board of Directors of the Mt. Hood Community College Foundation where he chaired the annual golf tournament which has raised multiple thousands of dollars to benefit the college. He is also still active professionally serving on the Board of Directors of Clackamas County Bank, the oldest community bank in Oregon. George is also active in his support and recently donated money to upgrade the gazebo at Oral Hull Retreat Center; but he did not stop at a cash donation. He donned his work clothes and wielded a paint brush to restore the gazebo.

George Morgan’s unwavering commitment and excellence on behalf of Oral Hull Foundation has made life better for countless blind individuals and therefore made life better for the whole community.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, April 30th, 2013 at 1:21 pm and is filed under Abeyance. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

 (New 05-16-15)

 

Dr. Raymond ‘Ray’ Karr

Sailor Rest Your Oar

He volunteered as a submarine sailor with the rank of Torpedoman.

Posted on in Obituaries

FIXED LINK ON 12-19-15

Dr. Raymond W. Karr, 89, passed away on September 5, 2014 at St. Patrick Hospital. He was born in Oak Park, Illinois on November 4, 1924 to Peter and Eda Karr. Ray attended St. Paul’s Lutheran Elementary School. He graduated from Proviso Township High School in Maywood, Illinois in 1942.

World War II broke out and Ray served his country from 1942 to 1946 in the U.S. Navy. He volunteered as a submarine sailor with the rank of Torpedoman. His submarine, the U.S.S. Parche, under Commander Ramage in the Pacific War Theatre became one of the most highly decorated ships of the Navy. Ray received nine wartime medals and decorations for his service on the Parche. Stephen Moore records his battle experiences in the book “Silent Warriors.”

After the war, as a civilian, he returned to school, attending college at the University of Illinois and University of Montana earning a B.S. in Forestry. In later years, he completed a Masters of Science in Environmental Sciences and a Ph.D. in Forestry.

Ray started his forestry work in 1948 in Troy, Montana. In 1953, he became a professional forester on the Kootenai National Forest followed by service as District Ranger in Sitka, Alaska; Forest Supervisor in Butte, Montana; head of Wilderness and Wild Area Studies in Washington, D.C. and Assistant Regional Forester in Missoula, Montana. Throughout this time, he authored “Forests for People” University of Michigan Press. Co-authored with Michael Frome, “Search for Solitude” US Gov. Printing Office. Co-authored with John Grove, “Timber Management Plan” Bitterroot National Forest 1968. Planned and wrote Sitka and Ketchikan’s Timber Management Plans 1958, Tongass National Forest, Alaska. He also authored a number of technical papers on Forest Service Administration relating to the in-service public involvement process.

In 1953, Ray first met Jane Karr (Eureka, MT) at the University of Montana. They married in 1954. They have three children: R. Peter Karr (Denver, Co), Eda Lyn Karr (Stevensville, Mt) and Raylene Saur (Anchorage, AK). Peter and Raylene are alumni of the University of Montana and Eda graduated from Cal. State. Other survivors include four grandchildren, three great-grandsons and his brother James Karr. He is preceded in death by his siblings William Karr and Marion Dziagwa.

Ray retired from the US Forest Service in 1984 and continued working as a consulting forester cruising timber and researching Grizzly Bear habitat field studies for the next four years. Ray also ranched with his partner of many years, Steve Sherrick, in the Bitterroot Valley, east of Stevensville, MT. As Ravalli County volunteers, Ray, Gary Nelson, and Ron McCann developed and digitized the Ravalli County road inventory. Ray enjoyed trout fishing for 26 years highlighted with annual trips to the Big Hole with Dale Burk and Steve Yurich. He also enjoyed big game hunting with long-time friends Don Durland and Glen Beckman. When not in Montana, he loved hiking the island of Maui with Louie Rosado. Near the end of his life, he was proud to participate in the last Big Sky Honor Flight with his friends Al Adams and Scott Drake.

Through all the years, he filled his life with the love of many animals. He was passionate about his many pets from snakes to horses, but especially dogs. During the last few years his companion dog, Panda, made sure he had help as he walked the fields of his neighborhood.

A service will be held on Friday, October 3rd, at 2 p.m. at the Western Montana State Veterans Cemetery. A celebration of life will be held at the home of Ray and Jane Karr, 6150 S. Meadowwood Lane, Missoula, MT directly following the service. All are welcome.

 (New 05-16-15)

 

USS Torsk, only sub to sink train in World War II

FIXED LINK ON 12-19-15

Don Lichty of Lemon Bay Isles mobile home Park in Englewood, Fla. is pictured outside his home in Concord, N.H. in his navy uniform during World War II. Photo provided

Don Lichty of Lemon Bay Isles mobile home park in Englewood was a torpedoman aboard the USS Torsk in World War II. Her claim to fame was she was the only submarine in the U.S. Navy to sink a train. She also sent the last two Japanese ships to bottom hours before the end of the Second World War.

Lichty grew up in Concord, N.H. and went to sea in 1945 aboard the sub built in Portsmouth, N.H. Even before the Torsk reached the war zone the ship’s crew suffered a tragedy when one of the seamen was accidentally swept off the sub’s conning tower during a practice dive off Portsmouth.

“Bill Snow was my best friend aboard the Torsk. He came up to relieve me on watch and I never saw him again,” the 85-year-old former torpedoman said. “The theory is he didn’t hear the command to clear the bridge just before the sub went down for a practice dive.”

The Torsk went on its first combat patrol off the coast of Japan in June 1945.

FIXED LINK ON 12-19-15

The USS Torsk is painted for battle with tiger shark’s teeth on the bow. The Tench Class submarine made its 2nd combat cruise into the Sea of Japan. Photo courtesy of Kevin H.

“We were on lifeguard duty off the northern coast. We were there to pick up B-29 bomber crews that might have to ditch in the sea,” Lichty said. “We never picked up anyone but we did go searching for Japanese ships to sink.

“It was June 2, 1945, we found a ship unloading oil at dockside. We fired a couple of torpedoes, but they apparently went under the ship, and hit a train trestle behind the tanker. At that moment a freight train filled with ammunition was crossing the trestle. A huge explosion erupted destroying the train, the military supplies and the trestle,” the former sailor explained.

On that first combat patrol, Lichty and the other sailors aboard the Torsk got to go topside and check out Mount Fuji from the deck of their submarine.

“Our skipper, Cmdr. Lou Lewellen, allowed us go up on the conning tower and see Mount Fuji,” he said. “I never landed in Japan, but I did get to see Mount Fuji”

FIXED LINK ON 12-19-15

Don Lichty is pictured holding a piece of teak planking from the USS Torsk, the submarine he served on during World War II. In front of him is a metal bracelet he made while in the navy showing the two dolphins of the “Silent Service.” It’s engraved with his name and his service number. Sun photo by Don Moore.

The other unusual happening aboard the Torsk on that first combat cruise, one of their sailors developed appendicitis and had to be rushed to surgery back in Guam. Instead of sailing back to port, the Torsk rendezvoused with another U.S. submarine heading to port, off the coast of Japan, and gave the sick sailor to the returning sub crew,” he explained.

It was on their second combat cruise into enemy waters that the Torsk intercepted a Japanese radio message that told them precisely where the four mine fields were entering the Sea of Japan.

“With the new sonar we had just installed on the Torsk we could detect underwater mines. It took us 16 hours to negotiate our way through the four mine fields at the entrance to the Sea of Japan,” Lichty said. “I was on the bow plane going through the mine fields. We kept the boat at a 2-percent angle so our sonar would reach further ahead of us.

“There was a lot of kelp in the water that gave us false readings. After the third mine field we were going very slowly when a sonar guy yelled out, ‘Mine 200 yards ahead!’ There was absolutely nothing we could do to stop the sub,” he said. “It turned out a large fish had suddenly turned and gone in a different direction. When it turned it gave us a false reading. Moments later the fish swam off.”

It wasn’t long after that the Torsk negotiated the last mine field and entered the Sea of Japan that separated Japan from China and served as an inland sea for enemy shipping of all kinds.

 (New 05-16-15)

Paul M. DeGal TM2(SS)

Sailor Rest Your Oar

WWII Eternal Patrol & WWII Sailing List - Paul M. DeGal TM2(SS) - May 46 - Jun 46 - Decommissioning Crew - Eternal Patrol 05/16/14

 (New 05-14-15)

Jeff Peters

Yesterday at 6:19am

United States Navy Torpedomen

FIXED LINK ON 12-19-15

FIXED LINK ON 12-19-15

Don Boyer

Death to the Imperial Navy! Always liked this shot. Wonder if that was before or after BuOrd did all that heavy work fixing the torpedoes?

 (added jpg photo on 12-19-15)

FIXED LINK ON 12-19-15

WW II Submarine Torpedomen

 (added jpg photo on 12-19-15)

Nagasaki 20 minutes after Atomic Bomb Drop in 1945

 (added jpg photo on 12-19-15)

Damaged Japanese WW II Torpedo in Japan after atomic bomb drop

 (added jpg photo on 12-19-15)

Robert Wayne Camp

April 9 at 3:58pm

Fairey Barracuda

Role: Torpedo bomber, dive bomber
Manufacturer:
Fairey Aviation...
Blackburn Aircraft
Boulton Paul
Westland Aircraft
Designer: Marcel Lobelle
First flight: 7 December 1940
Introduction: 10 January 1943
Primary user: Fleet Air Arm
Produced: 1941–1945
Number built: 2,607

Specifications (Barracuda Mk II)
General characteristics
Crew: 3
Length: 39 ft 9 in (12.12 m)
Wingspan: 49 ft 2 in (14.99 m)
Height: 15 ft 2 in (4.62 m)
Wing area: 405 ft² (37.62 m²)
Empty weight: 9,350 lb (4,250 kg)
Loaded weight: 13,200 lb (6,000 kg)
Max. takeoff weight: 14,100 lb (6,409 kg)
Powerplant: 1 × Rolls-Royce Merlin 32 liquid-cooled V12 engine, 1,640 hp (1,225 kW)

Performance:
Maximum speed: 228 mph (198 kn, 367 km/h) at 1,750 ft (533 m)
Cruise speed: 195 mph (170 kn, 314 km/h) at 5,000 ft (1,524 m)
Range: 686 mi (597 nmi, 1,104 km) with 1,620 lb (736 kg) torpedo
Service ceiling: 16,600 ft (5,080 m)
Wing loading: 32.6 lb/ft² (159 kg/m²)
Power/mass: 0.12 hp/lb (0.20 kW/kg)
Climb to 5,000 ft (1,524 m): 6 min

Armament:
Guns: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers K machine guns in rear cockpit
Bombs: 1× 1,620 lb (735 kg) aerial torpedo or 4× 450 lb (205 kg) depth charges or 6× 250 lb (110 kg) bombs

See More

 (added jpg photo on 12-19-15)

Estil D. Hooper, TMC(SS)

On USS Diodon (SS-349) 1948 to 1951

Hooper, Estil D - TMC/SS   (John)

Email: jlhooper624@yahoo



USS Diodon - SS-349 -  Rate: SN(SS)
From 12/48 to 6/51

USS Hammerhead - SS-364 -  Rate: TM3(SS)
From 1/52 to 1/54

USS Bluegill - SS-242 -  Rate: TM3(SS)
From 1/53  to 10/53

USS Charr - SS-328 -  Rate: TM2(SS)
From 2/55 to 4/57

USS Capitaine - SS-336 -  Rate: TM2(SS)
From 4/57 to 7/57

USS Sea Devil - SS-400 -  Rate: TM2(SS)
From 10/57 to 1/58

USS Catfish - SS-339 -  Rate: TM1(SS)
From 10/58 to 1/60

USS Nereus - AS-17 -  Rate: TM1(SS)
From 9/60 to 9/63

 

Hutman, Clifford M. First Class Torpedo Man

Sailor Rest Your Oar

Clifford M. Hutman - Huerfano World - February 17, 1994 - Clifford M. Hutman, 65, of Walsenburg died in Huerfano Medical Center Feb. 13, 1994. Born in Rouse Jan. 18, 1929, the son of John and Verna Hutman, he attended school at Rouse.

 He then joined the US Navy serving from 1948 to 1950 and attained the rank of First Class torpedo man in submarines. Upon his return from military service he started working at CF&I in Pueblo as a truck driver. He retired in 1984 after 28 years.

 He married the former Rosemary Andreatta Nov. 22, 1951 in Walsenburg. Mr. Hutman was a member of St. Mary Church and the Knights of Columbus. Survivors include his wife, Rosemary, Walsenburg; a daughter, Lynette Omer, Walsenburg; two brothers, Tom Hutman, Elkhart, KS, and George Hutman, Pueblo; three sisters Helen Pavlick, Ethel Ritzus and Evelyn DiPaolo, all of Pueblo; two grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Funeral mass was from St. Mary Church Wednesday. Burial was in North St. Mary Cemetery. J.M. Antle Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.
  (New 05-29-15)

John P. Zebrowski, Torpedoman Second Class

 (added jpg photo on 12-19-15)

Paul "mel" lay torpedoman first class
tour guide

 (added jpg photo on 12-19-15)

Mel served in the 13th Air Force, US Army Air Corps during WW II. Mel's group flew B-25 and B-26 medium bombers and provided anti-submarine duties before being transferred to New Caledonia.

He trained at the US Navy Torpedo School and was awarded the Navy Torpedoman's Mate rating insignia.

 LONOKE -- William Fred "Bill" Wilson, 77, of Lonoke, died April 17, 1998. He was born February 5, 1921, in Lonoke County to the late Charles W. Wilson and Bealie Wilson.  He was a retired farmer and a WWII Navy Veteran (torpedoman first class on the USS Phillip).

  He was a member of the Lonoke Baptist Church.  He loved to fish and spend time at Greer's Ferry Lake.
   Mr. Wilson is survived by his wife of 46 years, Joyce Wilson; a daughter, Emily Roberts; a son and daughter-in-law, Page and Cary Wilson; grandchildren, Greg Horness, Alison Roberts, Ian Wilson and Mary Elizabeth Wilson, all of Lonoke.  He is also survived  by two sisters, Flora Morrow of Lonoke and Goldie Compton of Little Rock; and a brother, Joe Wilson of Lonoke.

   Services will be 10 a.m. Monday, April 20, 1998, at Boyd Funeral Home Chapel.  Interment will be at Lonoke Cemetery by Boyd Funeral Home of Lonoke.  In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Arkansas Cancer Research Center or your favorite charity. 

Family will receive friends at their home at 619 College Street, Lonoke.

Visitation begins at the funeral home at 1 p.m. today (19 Apr 1998).

  (New 05-29-15)

Andrew T. Guthrie, Torpdeoman's Mate 3RD Class

Sailor Rest Your Oar

 (added jpg photos on 12-19-15)

Don Merle Finney, Torpedoman's Mate
 

Sailor Rest Your Oar

 (added jpg photos on 12-19-15)

Leonard Mayfield Chandler, Chief Torpedoman

Sailor Rest Your Oar

 

 (added jpg photos on 12-19-15)

USS Liscome Bay: Hit By a Torpedo Near Makin Atoll During World War II

Elmo B. Blackmon torpedoman

Originally published by World War II magazine. Published Online: June 12, 2006 

96 Responses to “USS Liscome Bay: Hit By a Torpedo Near Makin Atoll During World War II”

S Bennett says: 11/11/2008 at 3:49 pm My dad, Elmo B. Blackmon of Louisiana, was a torpedoman. He says that his name appeared on the posted list of enlisted men who were to board the Liscome Bay. His name was posted on the bulletin board with orders to be ready to board .

On the appointed boarding day, the names of the crew we called as the men boarded.

He was left alone at the staging area, since his name was never called to board. When he asked the man who was calling out the names, the man told Dad to go back because they already had boarded enough torpedomen.

I only recently heard this story from Dad. Is there any place where I can find the original list of names that might show my dad's name? If you can't help me, could you point me in the right direction?

- See more at: http://www.historynet.com/uss-liscome-bay-hit-by-a-torpedo-near-makin-atoll-during-world-war-ii.htm#sthash.3pfskSrr.dpuf

 (New 05-28-15)

 

Chief Torpedoman's Mate Uniform

USS BUSH (DD 529)

Back to Photos List


Chief Torpedoman Uniform
Chief Torpedoman's Mate Uniform

Pictured: Ray Mayhugh, June 1944

Ray, a Pearl Harbor survivor, was assigned to the BUSH for her entire life (May 10, 1943 through her sinking April 6, 1945). Luckily, Ray also survived the sinking at Okinawa, as noted in the telegram below dated April 23, 1945.

 

Chief Torpedoman Uniform
CTM's Telegram
Though the spelling was not great, the news in this case was. Many similar telegrams were required, and not all bore good news.

FIXED LINKS ON 12-19-15

 

Andrew S. Wright Jr. USS Diodon Shipmate Torpedoman passed away on Oct. 16, 2009

 

FIXED LINK ON 12-19-15

http://forums.military.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/297192721/m/6250017770001/p/22

WILLIAMSBURG - Andrew Shirley Wright Jr. passed peacefully into eternal life on Friday, Oct. 16, 2009, at the age of 83. Andy Wright, a retired aeronautical engineer from NASA spent his retirement years in the Williamsburg area devoting his last years to taking care of his beloved surviving wife, Dorothy Wright. Andy Wright was born in 1926 in Richmond, Va.

He loved science and engineering as a boy - designing model aircraft from the age of six. He also loved adventure and dreamed of faraway lands from early days - both dreams that he would later fulfill. His mother also had ambitions for him.

Despite his family's modest beginnings, through his mother's determination that he do better than his parents, she emphasized the value of education and demanded that he complete high school. He would later go on to more than fulfill her (and his) dreams by earning a university degree, becoming a highly successful engineer at NASA, marrying an accomplished and loving wife, and raising four children all of whom would earn multiple degrees and go on to successful professional careers.

During WWII, he joined the U.S. Navy's Submarine Service, serving on the USS Barb and the USS Diodon. Although he started out as a Torpedoman, he later transitioned to Electronics Technician Second Class, and eventually left the Navy seven years later as a Lieutenant Junior Grade.

His fascination with science, engineering and adventure continued after the Navy. He earned a Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and then went on to participate in the greatest adventure of all - the U.S. Space Program. He worked at NASA for 32 years, and was part of the team to launch the first Mars Lander - Viking - in 1976. He later participated in the Laminar Flow program designing energy efficient wing technology. This same love of science he shared with his family, frequently discussing scientific accomplishments and principles with his children.

As children, we all remember my father as a reader and lover of classical music. He read prolifically throughout his life, often sharing new things he'd learned with us. During our youth, Dad didn't take us to sports events, instead he took us to the library and classical music concerts; thereby instilling a love of learning and the arts in his children at an early age. He also loved travel and stories of challenging adventures in remote locations such as Antarctica.

Although he was not able to travel much in his middle years because of a career and a family, after retirement, he was able to spend several years criss-crossing America on long driving trips with his wife visiting various national parks and monuments such as Yellowstone, Yosemite, Grand Tetons, Glacier and Crater Lake.

This travel and the ability share it with his wife, were a highlight in his retirement. The other love that Andy Wright had was fishing. The family frequently vacationed at the Outer Banks in North Carolina where he took each of his children surf fishing or out on head boats to fish. His comment upon retirement was that his goal in life was now "to make the Red Snapper extinct."

Most of all, Andy Wright's legacy to his family will be the memory of his unwavering love and support for them and his love and devotion to Jesus Christ. His family was one of the most important things in life to him. He always set the right priorities at home, demonstrating how much his wife meant to him by telling us kids "not to wear out his wife".

He was extremely supportive in all our endeavors and provided encouragement and a home to come back to when needed. His Christian faith was evident in everything he did - devotion to family, commitment to the "right and moral thing to do" in every action, and an emphasis on individual devotion to God. He will be sorely missed.

He was a devoted and loving husband and a caring, supportive and mentoring father. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Dorothy Mae Mapp Wright; his daughter, Deborah Effemey and her husband, Gary Effemey; his daughter, Judy Lyver; his son, Benjamin Wright; his son, Henry Wright and his wife, Lori Wright; and three grandchildren, John Lyver, V, Tom Lyver, and Lacey Wright. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2009, at the Nelsen Funeral Home, 3785 Strawberry Plains Rd., Williamsburg, Va. Burial will be at the Williamsburg Memorial Park Cemetery following the service. The family will receive friends on Tuesday evening, Oct. 20, 2009, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Nelsen Funeral Home. Flowers can be sent to Nelsen Funeral Home. Any donations can be made to the Salvation Army, Andy Wright's favorite charity. Online condolences may be expressed by visiting www.nelsencares.com .

View and post condolences on our online guestbook at http://www.dailypress.com/guestbooks  .

Published in Daily Press from October 18 to October 20, 2009

An Awesome site! It was my privelege to serve aboard USS Chopper (Key West); USS Redfish (San Diego) and USS Diodon (San Diego) between 1962-66.
Patrick Householder <Patrick_Householder@Prodigy.net>
Issaquah, WA USA - Monday, April 05, 1999 at 14:06:39 (PDT) http://www.webenet.net/~ftoon/memory/guestbook97-99.html

June/July 2002 

Remarks for The Honorable Tim S. McClain, General Counsel, United States Department of Veterans Affairs, to the American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor.

San Antonio, Texas

May 18, 2002

STANLEY MROZ torpedoman first class

Sailor Rest Your Oar

On December 31, 2001 God called another American hero home — Stanley Mroz, torpedoman first class, USN. Stanley enlisted in the U.S. Navy in August of 1938, and served aboard the original USS Canopus (AS-9) before being assigned to submarine duty. Stanley was taken prisoner by the Japanese on May 6, 1942 when Corregidor was forced to capitulate.

Unfortunately he spent the next three years and eight months as a prisoner of war. Initially, he was held at Bilibid Prison in Manila, next he was sent to Pasay School at Nichols Field. His commanding officer at Nichols Field was the brutal and sadistic Japanese officer called the “White Angel.” From Nichols Field Stanley was sent to northern Japan on the hell ship Noto Maru (1944). Ultimately he ended up at Sendai Camp #6 in Hanawa. He was liberated in January of 1946 and released from active duty in September of 1946.

Stanley was preceded in death by his wife Margaret “Eileen” Mroz, and a son, Daniel Mroz. He is survived by a son Dick Mroz of Shirley, Indiana, and a daughter Pat Mroz of Anderson, Indiana. If there are any sons or daughters of those incarcerated at Sendai #6 in Hanawa and United States doing surveys where builders planned to construct dams, canals and tunnels. He retired in 1981 from the international consulting firm of Woodward-Clyde Consulting.

He was a charter member of the New York-Philadelphia Section of AEG and served as treasurer, vice chairman and chairman. He was vice president in 1976 and president in 1977 of the Association of Engineering Geologists. In 1984, he received a citation for the Bronze Star, but no medal, from the Army.

If you would like to correspond, Dick’s e-mail is YDMIND@hrtc.net , and Pat’s is PLMROZ20@aol.com .

 (New 08-24-15)

Veterans at Pine Lake - R to T

Alexander "Alex" STASSEL, Chief Torpedoman/Mate

Veterans Buried at Pine Lake Cemetery Surnames of R to T

City of LaPorte, Indiana

Sailor Rest Your Oar

Surname

Given Name

Home address

Next of Kin

Place Born

DOB

DOD

Burial

Grave

Lot

 Row

Section

Section

Branch of Service

War Served In

Rank

Enlisted

Disc

STASSEL

Alexander "Alex"

717 Waverly Rd. LaPorte, In.

wife - Ruth

LaPorte, In.

07/10/1915

08/08/1985

08/12/1985

7

5-A

 

 

Chapel Hill

U.S. Navy

WW2

Chief Torpedo-man/Mate

09/14/1942

08/31/1946

 (New 08-24-15)

 

Library of Congress receives 100 DVDs for 'Veterans History Project ...

Tom Moore's War Story

 (added jpg photo on 12-19-15)

Tom Moore and the crew of the USS Perch were captured by the Japanese after their sub was sunk in the Java Sea in 1942. Photo provided

Tom Moore, who lived in Eagle Point mobile home park south of Punta Gorda, Fla. was one of those guys. He served as a teenage torpedo-man aboard the USS Perch, the first American submarine sunk by the Japanese in World War II.

His boat went down in 1942 in the Java Sea off Borneo. Moore, no relation, and his whole crew, were captured and became Japanese slave laborers. For 3 1/2 years he worked for the Emperor in a camp on an island off Borneo.

He spoke fluent Japanese and Malaysian when he returned from World War II. I asked him how a kid who grew up on the streets of Monticello, N.Y. learn to speak Japanese? His response, “It was easy. When your life depended on it speaking Japanese it wasn’t hard at all to learn.”

(New 08-23-15)

EKU Veterans Memorial Wall | Military & Veterans Affairs | Eastern ...

George Talford Innings

Sailor Rest Your Oar

 

 (added jpg photo on 12-19-15)

Rank: 

Torpedoman's Mate 3rd Class

Conflict: 

WWII

Branch of Service: 

Navy

County of Residence: 

Bell

State of Residence: 

Kentucky

Year of Birth: 

1922

Year of Death: 

1944

Years at Eastern: 

1940-1942

(New 08-23-15)

MaritimeQuest - USS California BB-44 Message Board 1 through 24

CHESTER BENJAMIN WALL- TORPEDOMAN

November 25, 2006

MY DADDY SERVED ON THE USS CALIFORNIA BB-44 Decommissioned: 14 February 1947 AND I HAVE NEVER BEEN ABLE TO FIND ANY PHOTOS OF HIS SHIP AND ANY INFORMATION ABOUT THE CALIFORNIA. I SINCERELY WOULD LIKE TO THANK YOU FOR PROVIDING ME THIS GREAT AND TEARFUL REUNION WITH MY DADDY'S MEMORIES AND THE GLORIOUS PHOTOS OF THE CALIFORNIA. I AM WONDERING IF THERE ARE ANY PEOPLE LEFT ALIVE WHO SERVED WITH MY DADDY ON BOARD THE CALIFORNIA. I SURELY WOULD LIKE TO TALK WITH THEM. MY DADDY'S NAME WAS CHESTER BENJAMIN WALL- SEAMAN 1ST CLASS. MY DADDY WAS BORN IN 1912 AND I DON'T KNOW WHEN HE SERVED IN THE WAR. I THINK HE SAID HE WAS A TORPEDOMAN.

THANK YOU SO MUCH AND GOD BLESS.

(New 08-23-15)

DD-649 U.S.S. ALBERT W. GRANT

Decommissioned: 16 July 1946

Armamd Caouette Torpedoman Second Class

Sailor Rest Your Oar

 (added jpg photo on 12-19-15)

Newer Entries

70th Anniversary: PT-305 Arrives in the Mediterranean

Jim Nerison Torpedoman

Added jpg photo on 12-20-15

Seventy years ago, on 21 April 1944, PT-305 arrived in the Mediterranean. Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron 22, or RON22, was transported to the combat theater aboard the USS Merrimack. According to the deck log of PT-305, she was kept on board the Merrimack for several days, anchored in the port of Mers El Kébir in Algeria until 25 April. Lt. W.B. Borsdorff wrote: “1825: Put over side into water by U.S. Army and moored portside to alongside USS Merrimack.”

Crew member, torpedo man Jim Nerison remembered:

The squadron spent about three months in Miami, Florida for shake down and training.  The training included all aspects for which the boats were designed:  torpedo firing, gunnery practice, speed trials and boat handling maneuvers.

 In preparation for over-seas duty the boats were dry-docked, freshly painted, and all systems were checked out thoroughly.

 To avoid the rough water off of Cape Hatteras, we once again took the intracoastal waterways north to Norfolk.  PT 305 and three other boats were placed in cradles on the deck of a navy tanker.  The tanker joined a large convoy of other ships for an Atlantic crossing; then through the Straits of Gibraltar and into the Mediterranean Sea.  The tanker anchored in the harbor at Oran, Algeria on the north shore of Africa.

 There was only one crane in Oran with the capability to pick up a 70+-ton PT boat so we had to wait two weeks to be off loaded into the water.  We took the boats from Oran, stopped in Algiers to re-fuel, and then on to Bizerte in Tunisia. 

Click here to learn more about PT-305 and her restoration here at The National WWII Museum.

Post by Curator Kimberly Guise.

(New 08-23-15)

Obituaries o-b001, Clark County IL

Rex BUCKNER, torpedoman's mate in the US Navy during World War II

Sailor Rest Your Oar

20 November 2002

Rex Buckner, 90, of Marshall, passed away on Wednesday, November 20, 2002 in Union Hospital at Terre Haute, Indiana.  He was born October 2, 1912 at West York, the son of Jesse Buckner and Emma Knapp Buckner.  He married Ann Pionkowski on August 1, 1941 at Calument City, Illinois.

Surviving are his wife, Ann; a son and daughter-in-law, David and Ruth Buckner of Battle Ground, Indiana; a daughter and son-in-law, Sandra Kay and Daniel Cirullo of Hammond, Indiana; a sister and brother-in-law, Madge and Harry Garling of Roselawn, Indiana; a sister, Mary Mickey of Terre Haute, Indiana; grandchildren Susan Lloyd, David (Jinette) Smith, Mark (Adrienne) Smith, Joshua Smith and Christine (Tim) Burke; great grandchildren Danielle, Logan, Emily, Jacob, Joslyn, and Kirsten; three nieces, Karen Peel, Marlene Scott and marily Ulrey; three nephews, Frank Mickey, Stanley Mickey and Tom Mickey.  A brother, Ansel Buckner, preceded him in death.

Mr. Buckner was a member of the Trinity United Methodist Church of Marshall and the Veterans of Foreign Wars.  He served as a torpedoman's mate in the US Navy during World War II.

Funeral services were held Saturday at Pearce Funeral Home with Reverend Judy Williams officiating.  Burial was held at the Bailiff Cemetery near West York.

Memorial contributions may be made to donor's choice.

(New 08-23-15)

...a salute to our veterans and to those currently serving our country

Sailor Rest Your Oar

Added jpg photo on 12-20-15

In memory

Torpedoman Third Class

Wallace Aaron Hicks

1943-1946

WWII, Occupation of Germany,

1st Lieutenant 1951-1954

(New 08-23-15)

World War 2 Honor List of Casualties

FIXED PHOTO ON 12-20-15

Sailors Rest Your Oars

BY COUNTIES:

FAIRFIELD -- HARTFORD -- LITCHFIELD -- MIDDLESEX -- NEW HAVEN --  NEW LONDON - TOLLAND -- WINDHAM
UNKNOWN

FAIRFIELD COUNTY:

KOCKLER, Lawrence Richard

Torpedoman 1c

USN

wife

Mrs. Vera L Kockler

71 James St., Hamdenm, New Haven

McKENNA, John Richard

Torpedoman's Mate 3c

USNR

parents

Mr. & Mrs. John Joseph McKenna

108 Southmayd Rd., Waterbury

MIDDAUGH, Jack

Torpedoman's Mate 3c

USNR

mother

Mrs. Mildred I Middaugh

95 Aetna St., Naugatuck

NEW HAVEN COUNTY:

BIELUCZYK, Edward

Torpedoman's Mate 2c

USN

parents

Mr.&Mrs. Walter Bieluczyk

29 Merriam St., Meriden

BRUBECK, Fred Lee

Torpedoman's Mate 1c

USN

wife

Mrs. Florence Brubeck

839 Asylum Ave., Hartford

KORPONAI, Zigmond Anthony

Chief Torpedoman's Mate

USN

wife

Mrs. Mary Korponai

184 Barnum Terrace, Stratford

LESCHINSKI, Thaddeus John

Torpedoman's Mate 1c

USNR

parents

Mr. &Mrs. Charles Andrew Leschinski

123 Harbison Ave., Hartford

LOUGHLIN, Thomas Philip

Torpedoman's Mate 2c

USN

father

Mr. William J. Loughlin

11 Cromwell St., Hartford

MALONEY, Thomas James

Torpedoman's Mate 3c

USNR

parents

Mr. & Mrs. John L. Maloney

78 Rock Avenue, New Britain

 


MIDDLESEX COUNTY
 

PIZZINI, Gineo Aliprando

Torpedoman's Mate 3c

USN

parents

Mr. & Mrs. John Pizzini

Box 52, Higganum

POST, Eugene Wallace

Torpedoman's Mate 3c

USN

parents

Mr. & Mrs. Eugene A Post

220 Main St., Deep River

NEW LONDON COUNTY:

BELL, Frederick Richard

Torpedoman's Mate 2c

USN

wife

Mrs. Ruth Barbara Bell

22 Beckwith St., New London

CLARK, Benjamin Lee

Torpedoman's Mate 1c

USN

wife

Mrs. Benjamin Lee Clark

519 Bank St., New London

CRISTELLO, Dominick Mike

Torpedoman's Mate 1c

USN

wife

Mrs. Ethel Snow Cristello

74 10th St., New London

GILL, Joseph Mathew

Chief Torpedoman

USN

wife

Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Gill

32 Hempsted St., New London

GRAHAM, Merritt Dayton

Chief Torpedoman

USNR

wife

Mrs. Anna Catherine Graham

200 Connecticut Aver., New London

LEMPER, Clarence Lister

Chief Torpedoman's Mate

USN

wife

Mrs. Agatha Louise Lemper

67 Blackhall, New London

MULVENNA, George Aloysius

Chief Torpedoman's Mate

USN

wife

Mrs. Wilma Alice Mulvenna

c/o Mrs. James P. Brady, Buddington Rd., Groton

PACE, Delmont Norman

Chief Torpedoman's Mate

USN

wife

Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Pace

41 Thames St., Norwich

ROBB, Arthur Forest

Torpedoman's Mate 1c

USN

wife

Mrs. Dorothy Arlene Robb

R.F.D. 8, Norwichtown

SHEPHERD, William Albert

Torpedoman's Mate 2c

USN

wife

Mrs. Vera Emily Shepherd

P.O. Box 1507, New Londone

THRASHER, Robert Theodore

Torpedoman's Mate 1c

USN

wife

Mrs. Thelma B. Thrasher

72 Grove St., New London

WELLS, John Harrison

Torpedoman 2c

USN

wife

Mrs. Elizabeth May Wells

Gales Ferry

(New 08-16-15)

 

Crew of PT-109 | The World War II Multimedia Database

Added jpg photo on 12-20-15

Caption: 

In a heavily retouched view, Lieutenant Junior Grade John F. Kennedy and his crew are photographed forward of the bridge. The twin .50 caliber Browning machine guns, 20mm Oerlikon anti-aircraft gun, and 21-inch Mark 8 torpedo tubes. The Mark 8, a World War I design, had problems with depth settings and its contact exploder frequently shattered instead of triggering the explosive. Also, the grease packed in the tube would burn when the torpedo left the tube, causing a bright orange flash that would reveal the boats position at night. The PT Boats were often countered by "Rufe" A6M2-N Zero-Sen floatplanes at night, day raids, and larger naval surface combatants, but were effective against light coastal shipping in the Solomons. The crew on the last voyage of August 1-2, 1943, not all of whom are in the photo, included Lieutenant Junior Grade John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Boston, Massachusetts, commanding officer; Ensign Leonard J. Thom, Sandusky, Ohio, Executive Officer; Ensign George H. R. "Barney" Ross, Highland Park, Illinois, 37mm Gun Captain; Seaman 2nd class Raymond Albert, Akron, Ohio; Gunner's Mate 3rd class Charles A. "Bucky" Harris, Watertown, Massachusetts; Motor Machinist's Mate 2nd class William Johnston, Dorchester, Massachusetts; Torpedoman's Mate 2nd class Andrew Jackson Kirksey, Reynolds, Georgia (Killed in Action); Radioman 2nd class John E. Maguire, Dobbs Ferry, New York; Motor Machinist’s Mate 2nd class Harold William Marney, Springfield, Massachusetts (Killed in Action); Quartermaster 3rd class Edman Edgar Mauer, St. Louis, Missouri; Motor Machinist's Mate 1st class Patrick H. "Pappy" McMahon, Wyanet, Illinois (Severely Wounded in Action); Torpedoman's Mate 2nd class Ray L. Starkey, Garden Grove, California; and Motor Machinist's Mate 1st class Gerard E. Zinser, Belleville, Illinois. The photo has most of the forward gear removed from the photo.

Caption Written By: 

Jason McDonald

Photographed By: 

Unknown

Archive: 

John F. Kennedy

Date Photographed: 

Wednesday, July 1, 1942

City: 

Rendova

State/Province/Oblast: 

New Georgia

Country: 

Solomons

Copyright Notice: 

Caption ©2007 MFA Productions LLC Image in the Public Domain

Tags:

(New 08-16-15)

SEARCHING 4 JFK 109 CREW

Sailors Rest Your Oars

PT-109 was sliced in half by a Japanese destroyer
on August 1-2, 1943; two crewmen were killed,
11 survivors were rescued by PT-157on August 8, 1943.

To Orwell Today,

I'm doing research on the fate of the surviving PT 109 crewmen. I've got some information on the life and death of Kennedy, Thom, Ross, Albert, Harris, Maguire, and McMahon. However, there seems to be little information on the other PT 109 crewmembers.

Do you have any information on the post WW 2 life and death of William Johnston, Maurice Kowal, Edgar Mauer, and Raymond Starkey? I can't seem to find information on them or find their obituaries anywhere.

Thank you in advance for any help you can give me.

-Mike Geary

TM2C           Raymond L. Starkey        Torpedoman
TM2C           Andrew J. Kirksey           Torpedoman

(New 08-16-15)

Madaris, Medearis, Medaris, McDaris, McDearis, Medaries

            Participants in           

Added jpg photos on 12-20-15

20th Century Wars

World War II

John De Madaris Jr.

Naval Torpedoman, helped design and test new torpedoes during the war.

(New 08-15-15)

USS San Juan Torpedomen

Added jpg photo on 12-20-15

Name

Rank

Service Dates

Div/Sec

  Duty

Battle Station

Hometown

Contact

Brazil, Edward L.
     

TM2c

44 - 45

.

.

Torpedo Battery

Centerville, CA

brazilm@earthlink.net

DeCounter, Leo F

 

3/42 - 10/45

 

Torpedoman

Torpedoman

Rushville, IL

karidrgn@comcast.net

Goldsworth, Gerald

 

11/45 - 3/46

 

Ord

Torpedoman

West Sayville, NY

 

McMillan, Herbert

TM3c

42? - 45?

 

 

Torpedoman

Unaka, NC

 

(New 08-15-15)

North Carolinians Service Records February 7, 1945 to February 17, 1945

Navy Casualties:

Torpedoman’s Mate Third Class French Gordon Dixon, U.S.N.C.R.,
wounded, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Dixon, parents, Nathan’s Creek
 

(New 08-15-15)

Stories Submitted by Bangust Sailors

Added jpg photo on 12-20-15

COFFEE POT HISTORY
John E. Bye, Torpedoman 1/C

Added jpg photos on 12-20-15

I was assigned to the USS Bangust DE 739 in the year 1943. In February of 1944, 1 found myself in the South Pacific escorting all classes of navy ships over the entire Pacific.

The one thing we all had in common was that we all loved coffee.   Standing the 8:00 to 12:00 watch, or the 12:00 to 4:00, was hell without a good cup of coffee. We could not go to the mess deck for coffee! I then thought it would be great to have coffee right on our watch!

Being a Torpedo Man, my watch was on the 01 deck where the torpedo tubes were located. The 40mm was there also. I looked at the 40mm gun director forward of the gun and that's when the idea came to me. I had found my spot for the coffee pot!

My next door neighbor and pal from Quincy, Ma. was aboard the U.S.S. Caliente AO53. I received permission to visit him and the whaleboat took me to his ship. His ship carried 5" guns so I asked if I could have two aluminum powder cases. Permission was granted and I took them aboard our ship.

It took me a week or more to make the pot. All the figuring, the hammering and then stealing the handle from a swab. I got a brown medicine bottle from the pharmacist so the coffee could perk. I found an element somewhere and a square five gallon can. I cut the can in half, turned it upside down, cut a round hole in the bottom the size of the element, attached a four inch collar to the bottom and installed the element. An Electrician 1/C wired it for me. I then secured the bottom of the can to withstand heavy seas. I filled the pot with water and coffee and turned it on. From that day on we had coffee while we stood watch. The Captain said it was the best coffee aboard the ship. I'll always be thankful to the shipmates who helped me with this project.

This coffee pot made it through two typhoons: Dec 18, 1944, and one in February of 1945. I revere this coffee pot for the many hours of camaraderie and good coffee while on watch which has left me with many great memories.

This coffee pot retired with me to Quincy, Ma., in 1946. Since then, this coffee pot has been a conversational piece at the reunions I have attended. At our St. Petersburg reunions, coffee was once again served from this historical pot. It now has a permanent home in St. Petersburg, Florida. where I now reside.

John E. Bye
Torpedoman 1/C

(New 08-14-15)

 

Harold Reynold Zeorlin

Harold proudly served our country during the first days of World War II in the U.S. Navy as a Torpedoman aboard the USS Shark; a diesel ...

Sailor Rest Your Oar

Added jpg photo on 12-20-15

Birthdate:

Birthplace:

St. Joseph, Buchanan, MO USA

Death:

Died in Lost at Sea in the submarine "Shark" during WWII US

Immediate Family:

Son of Reynold Albert Zeorlin and Lillian Zeorlin
Brother of Arlene Clare Serocki; Donald F. Zeorlin; Nadine M. Ketchem; Gregory A. Zeorlin, Sr.; Virginia A. Jasper
and
1 other; and <private> Zeorlin« less

Managed by:

William Todd Serocki

Last Updated:

(New 08-14-15)

Hal Hunter Dupuy, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

Sailor Rest Your Oar

FIXED LINK ON 12-20-15

Andrew T. Guthrie, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

Sailor Rest Your Oar

FIXED LINKS ON 12-19-15

BOYD, Thomas Ray  Torpedoman's Mate, First Class, U.S. Navy

 Sailor Rest Your Oar
United States Navy
Entered the Service from: Alabama
Died: April 19, 1946
Missing in Action or Buried at Sea
Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery,Manila,Philippines
Awards: Purple Heart
Son of Mr Joseph E. Boyd of Hazel Green, AL

(New 08-01-15)

 

George H. Daly, a torpedo man in the Navy during World War II

Added jpg photo on 12-20-15

George Herald Daly

February 22, 1924 - July 8, 2015
Resided in Coeur d'Alene, ID

 

Obituary

Sailor Rest Your Oar

91 George Herald Daly, long-time resident of Coeur d'Alene, passed away into the arms of our Savior, Jesus Christ, on July 8, 2015 after a short illness. He was born February 22, 1924 in Casper, Wyoming to parents Archie and Agnes Daly. He was married to Lucille Daly for 65 years. They were married in Aberdeen, South Dakota and moved to Coeur d'Alene in 1955. George served his country as . He was very proud of his service. George was employed as a body and fender man, and was last employed for over 20 years for the Idaho State Highway Department. George loved the outdoors, and was an avid hunter and fisherman. He loved to go camping with his family during many summers at Independence Creek. George especially loved archery, and was a longtime member of The Coeur d'Alene Bowman Club. George was a longtime member of St. Pius X Catholic Church. George is survived by his wife Lucille, sons Mark (Kerstin), and Archie of Rathdrum, and Tim of Palm Springs CA. George is also survived by his grandchildren Christine of Spokane Valley WA, Michael of Post Falls ID, Grace of Rathdrum, ID, and Ben of San Francisco, CA. he also has 7 great-grandchildren. George has 4 brothers, Archie, Frank, Tony, and Dean Daly all who live in Aberdeen, South Dakota. He was preceded in death by his brother Ed Daly, and his eldest son, Mike Daly. A Memorial Mass will be held at 10:00am Monday July 13, 2015 at St. Pius X Catholic Church. Private family inurnment services will be held at St. Pius X at a later date.

 - See more at: http://www.yatesfuneralhomes.com/obituary/George-Herald-Daly/Coeur-d-Alene-ID/1526967#sthash.PPpHQuZF.dpuf

(New 08-01-15)

 

Wreaths Across America  ∕  Memory Wall D

Donald E. Mills Navy WWII Torpedo Man 3rd Class

See more at: http://www.wreathsacrossamerica.org/memory-wall-d/#sthash.vNMvmy3h.dpuf

(New 08-01-15)

The Unknown History of PT 109
July 1942-April 1943

Torpedomen Jack Edgar and Claude R. Dollar, TM 2/c of PT-109

Meanwhile in Panama, the boat transfers had initiated considerable jockeying among the squadrons for officers, men, and equipment, and the PT 109 was not immune to the beehive of activity. Jack Kempner was detached from 109 by Squadron Five boss Henry Farrow, who reassigned him to another boat, leaving Bryant Larson in command. Much later, Lieutenant Commander Farrow sent Kempner to the Elco plant back in the States to watch over construction of six replacement PT's.

Ensign John D. Chester was assigned a berth aboard 109 as the new executive officer, while other changes included the reassignment of fireman Joseph Hubler and torpedoman Jack Edgar. Hubler's position in the engine room was taken by James Marney; Edgar's replacement was Claude R. Dollar, TM 2/c, from PT 110.

(New 08-01-15)

On Eternal Patrol - Lost Submariners of World War II

 

Contact Us

 


Harold Eugene Updike

 Sailor Rest Your Oar

 

Added jpg photos on 12-20-15

Rank/Rate

Torpedoman's Mate, Third Class

Service Number

869 74 23

Birth Date

June 27, 1924

From

National City, California

Decorations

Purple Heart

Submarine

USS Gudgeon (SS-211)

Loss Date

April 18, 1944

Location

Off Iwo Jima

Circumstances

Probably sunk by air attack

Remarks

Harold was born in Huron, South Dakota.

 Photo courtesy of David Eugene Allen, nephew.  Information courtesy of Paul W. Wittmer.

(New 08-01-15)

 

Missouri WW2 NMCG Casualty List – H Surnames

HIMMELMANN, Leroy Rudolph, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Eva Himmelmann, 5307 N. Union, St. Louis

.HOOD, Earl Verner, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Harmon Hood, Rt. 2, Parma.

HUGHART, Robert Edwin, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Alice Hughart, 7464 Warner Ave., Richmond Heights, St. Louis.

(New 08-01-15)

Liberty Belle crashes and burns

LtScott14  Hiker

Join Date: Apr 2010

Location: Indiana

Posts: 722

Thanks: 2

Thanked 456 Times in 278 Posts

SgtBooker 44. My father was a torpedoman on a PT near New Guinea during WW2. He told of exploits, missions that were not anything beside suicide, to stop the Japanese. His favorites were a Kabar knife, 45acp 1911A, and the Thompson Submachine gun. He did transfer to a Destroyer escort, kept his kabar. Dad was in range of the surrender of Japanese on the Missouri. He has passed on, but I remember his stories.

(New 07-31-15)

Share Your Story

As part of constructing the South Dakota World War II Memorial, we want to preserve the stories of South Dakotans during that period. Please share with us a story of your experience during that time.

Kenneth Christianson

Kenneth Christianson served in the war as a Torpedoman First Class on a PT boat.   He also served in the Philippines, including the Battle of the Bulge.

Submitted November, 2001

(New 07-31-15)

William Francis Jones, TM2

Sailor Rest Your Oar

Added jpg photo on 12-20-15

 South Dakota World War 2 Casualties

Navy, Marine and Coast Guard
Transcribed by Karen Seeman

From "State Summary of War Casualties", U. S. Navy, 1946

Sailors Rest Your Oars

FEIOCK, Theodore Gustav, Torpedoman's Mate 3c, USNR, Father, Mr. Christ Felock, Bowdle

GATES, Freeman Edwin, Torpedoman's Mate 1c, USN, Mother, Mrs. Amelia Graham, 302 1st Ave. W., Mobridge

GIESEN, Frank Joseph, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, USN, Mother, Mrs. Barbar Giesen, Dimock

HEGERFELD, Lambert George, Torpedoman's Mate 2c, USNR, Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hegerfeld, Elkton

MCFARLING, Wesley Howard, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, USN, Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar McFarling, 832 Wisconsin Ave., S.W., Huron

SMITH, Thayne Charles, Torpedoman 2c, USN, Father, Mr. Lester Irvin Smith, 17 S. Ohio St., Clark

TOEBBE, Henry Edward, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, USN, Wife, Mrs. Lillian Isabell Toebbe, Rutland

(New 07-31-15)

torpedoman Francy Hereira

It’s funny. I could imagine that torpedo. I could imagine the cold-eyed warrior who would aim and launch it, and how our ship would blossom into a flare of orange light and we would all become dissociated atoms in orbit… Only the torpedoman on that ship, I’m pretty sure, was at that time an armorer’s mate named Francy Hereira. We got to be pretty good buddies later on. He wasn’t what you’d really call a cold-eyed killer. I cried in his arms all the day after I got back from that last trip, in my hospital room, when he was supposed to be searching me for contraband. And Francy cried with me.

(New 07-31-15)

http://www.kpva.org/JA13.pdf

Added jpg photos on 12-20-15

Don Bird, 78

 Sailor Rest Your Oar

He served in the U.S. Navy as a chief torpedoman submarine service aboard the USS Spadefish

SAN DIEGO - Don Bird, 78, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000, at San Diego Hospice.

Born July 16, 1921, in Detroit, he lived in San Diego for 14 years. He served in the U.S. Navy as a chief torpedoman submarine service aboard the USS Spadefish, earning the Presidential Unit Citation and Submarine Combat Insignia. He served aboard the USS Sirago doing intelligence gathering in the Arctic Circle area. He was an instructor on the shore-based USS Tambor and supported seaplane operations on the USS Guavina. He attended Special Weapons School in Key West, Fla. and served as a special weapons and torpedo instructor on the USS Dentuda. He retired in 1962 from military service and worked for the Civil Service Naval Ordinance Unit until retiring in 1973.

Mr. Bird is survived by his wife of 53 years, Mary Ellen Bird of San Diego; daughters Mary Catherine Reinhardt of Poway and Donna Geralyn Flynt of Escondido; brother John Arthur Bird of Highland Park, Mich.; grandchildren Martha Levine, Jennifer Lynn and Catherine Louise Reinhardt, Mette Christine and Gregory Byron Flynt; and great-granddaughter Megan Hardt Levine.

A memorial Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Friday, Feb. 7, at San Rafael Parish in Rancho Bernardo. Burial at sea is planned with full military honors.

The family suggests memorial donations to San Diego Hospice, 4311 Third Ave., San Diego, CA 92103; or the American Cancer Society, 1320 W. Valley Parkway, Suite 302, Escondido, CA 92029.

Alhiser-Comer Mortuary is handling arrangements.

 (New 05-17-15)

Ben Heck

Added jpg photo on 12-20-15

He served on the USS Finback, Sabalo, and S-41 submarines. He was a torpedo man, firing from the aft section of the boat.

Ben Heck will be 90 in July! As a World War II veteran, Ben is a member of the "Greatest Generation." He enlisted in the U.S. Navy Submarine service shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Interestingly, he first went to enlist with the Marines. However, they had met their enlistment quota for the day.

 Determined to enlist, he signed up with the Navy. He served on the USS Finback, Sabalo, and S-41 submarines. He was a torpedo man, firing from the aft section of the boat. He was on the USS Finback when it picked up George Bush after his fighter plane was downed by the Japanese.

Life in the submarine service was a challenge in those days! Unlike the nuclear submarines of today which can stay submerged for months, the WW II boats had to surface every day, usually at night, for air. The boats therefore ran the risk of Japanese planes and destroyers. The men took turns on look-out when the subs surfaced.

 One day, when it was Ben’s turn, he saw a Japanese destroyer, sounded the alarm, and barely got back into the boat when it was submerging! Life in the boat was tough – hot, no showers, men shared bunks. But the food was always freshly cooked and good, especially the bread!

When the subs docked, there was a mad rush for the showers! Ben often tells his family that he saw the world with the Navy – like going to Hawaii, going through the Panama Canal, etc. WW II stills elicits a lot of emotions within the country. Ben is extremely proud of his service in the Navy. Today, he is very active with local submarine associations.

 (New 05-17-15)

Henry David HULL, TM3

 Sailor Rest Your Oar


 

Added jpg photo on 12-20-15
Veteran World War II
Branch: U.S. Navy
Rank: Torpedoman, 3rd class
Dates of Service: 1943 - 1946
Theatre of Operation: Hawaii, Kaneohe Naval Air Base, Served on P.T. Boat
Honoree is: Deceased July 6, 1999
Submitted by Shirley Hull
 (New 05-17-15)

Victor Radwick, Torpedoman 2nd Class

Men in the photo: Standing L to R Victor Radwick, Torpedoman 2nd Class & Leo Dumouchelle, Staff Sgt.  Seated: Oliver Hopkins, Seaman & Richard Morris, Sgt 1st Class

Added jpg photo on 12-20-15

Front Page article in The Tribune:

Gathering of SLO County WWII veterans: Stories of war after decades of silence

Vets who are part of an upcoming tribute in SLO are finding it easier to share memories, so many years later

 (New 05-17-15)

TM3C Burton Hutchison on DD-747 1944 to 1946

Burton Hutchison TM3C 1944-1946 Clifton Forge, Virginia

Upon completion of torpedo school I was sent to pier 92 in NYC for assignment  to the USS Samuel N. Moore which at that time was on shakedown. 

 While at 92 I put in for  a 9 day leave which was rejected next put in for a 13 day leave which was approved.  When I returned from leave I became a crew member of the 747 at the Brooklyn navy yard.  Served aboard until April 46.

While in Shanghai I accumulated enough points for discharge.  Was transferred from the Moore to the Moore for transportation to Charleston SC.

The Moore I was transferred to was DE240 named after a sailor killed on the Arizona

Rather ironic being  transferred from the Moore to the Moore.

(New 07-11-04)

TM2 Bob Culver recalls DD-677 hit by shells from BB-63 on 16 April 1945

Bob Culver TM2/c 1944-1946. Lincoln, Nebraska

On April 16th, 1945 the destroyer USS McDermut (DD-677) was damaged by 2 5" hits and a 40 and 20 MM. fusillade from a friendly vessel.  Lucky the USS McDermut (DD-677)! 

The magnitude of her fortune becomes apparent when one learns from her Action Report that her "friend" was the battleship USS Missouri (BB-63). 

The big battleship was firing at low-flying Kamikazes, and the little destroyer happened to be on the receiving end in the outfield. 

This type of occurrence was always possible with the inner circle capital ships firing out toward the screen of destroyer in a large protective circle around the fleet. 

Does anyone remember the USS Samuel N. Moore having shrapnel come down on our ship???

(New 01-17-04)

The Torpedo Gang of USS Bush (DD-529)

Torpedomen were responsible for torpedos and depth charges. Torpedomen would often spend time on the bridge as part of the "wheel watch" when not involved in other duties. During enemy air attacks, torpedomen would often help in passing anti-aircraft ammo to some of the 20MM or 40MM guns. Since the torpedo gang had more men than needed to man the torpedo mounts and depth charges during combat, some of the men were assigned to other battle stations, such as a 20MM gun.

A number of torpedomen are pictured here aboard the USS BUSH in November 1944.


 

From Left to Right:

Front Two (on right with legs crossed): F. H. Tennessen-S1c, D. J. Anderson-S1c

Along the Back: J. J. Tybuszewski-S1c, J. C. Blair*-TM2c, G. E. Kasparek-TM1c, T. A. Borroz-TM1c, F. X. Palidino-TM2c, R. E. Youngren-S1c, M. Scott*-TM2c, C. G. Tillman*-TM2c, H. R. Williams-S2c, S. R. Mayhugh-CTM

*Died with sinking April 6, 1945


FIXED LINK & PHOTO ON 12-20-15

 

Story of Torpedoman's Mate Luther N. Morris from WWII

 I served in WWII from 1942-1945. My rate at discharge was TM2c. I served on the USS Albemarle for about 1 year and at the torpedo firing pier at New­port, RI test firing torpedoes. I was dis­charged 57 years ago. I am now 82 years old and I'll bet that most of my shipmate's are dead or brain dead like me.

Luther N. Morris

From Torpedoman's Association Feb 2003 Issue

(New 06-05-03)

CAVALLA'S CREWS

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World War II Roster

Cavalla Crew Interview

Joe Bellinghiere

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Joe Bellinghiere, Seaman 1st class, torpedoman striker. (Sometime between 1/1/43 and 7/1/44).

   I enlisted in the Navy in Omaha, Nebraska, on 30 September 1942, at the age of 20. After boot camp and torpedo school (both at San Diego), I was shipped out to New Hebrides where I joined the destroyer Wilson as a Seaman 1st class on 28 March 1943. I was transferred from the ship at Auckland, New Zealand, on 30 June 1943. Having applied for sub school--mainly as a way to get back home--I was ordered to New London, where I reported on 15 August 1943. I graduated on 1 January 1944, and was assigned to the Cavalla. I missed the commissioning party on 18 February because I was back in Omaha getting married! When I returned to New London, I noticed that most of the guys were bringing their wives, and having spent only 3 days with mine, I wanted to bring her out so we could be together for whatever time remained. So I talked to Captain Kossler, and said, "Captain, I just got married and I'm anxious to bring my wife out here." Kossler replied, "I can't tell you when we're leaving, but I can advise you not to bring her out." She stayed in Omaha. I was on board when Cavalla was commissioned.

Sub School, New London: One of the chief petty officers in charge of instructing the students at sub school took a dislike to my non-regulation boots. "Where did you get those boots?" he demanded. I replied: "Off a dead Marine at Guadalcanal. Where were you?" [I had been on Guadalcanal--but not during any of the battles.]

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Joe Bellinghiere, with submarine combat pin. (Sometime after Cavalla's first patrol, which ended 8/3/44. And sometime before he grew his moustache, which he's had ever since.)

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Torpedo man 2nd class, celebrating
the end of the war in San Francisco,
September 1945.

The Cavalla crew was a little nervous about the journey to Panama: the submarine Dorado, also built by the Electric Boat Company, had departed New London the previous October on her maiden voyage and been sunk en route to Panama.

A notice was posted in the submarine that a volunteer was needed to wash the crew's clothes. Each man, including the Captain, paid in $1 per month. No one wanted the job, but I saw an opportunity to make $65 a month without a lot of extra work (everyone wore shorts and sandals, at least when we got to the South Pacific), and the clothes were dried by putting them on the engines.

FIXED PHOTO ON 12-20-15
November 1998 ~ All photos courtesy of Dr. Bellinghiere virtue of Stephen Ford

Return to Cavalla Crews
Return to the Deep Domain

(New 09-18-03)

Francis Hugh Beaumont (Jr) USN Torpedoman Submarines

Sailor Rest Your Oar

Francis Hugh Beaumont (Jr), “Beau” as he was known in the Navy, was born on March 2, 1905 in St Paul, Neosho County, Kansas, a small town in the Southeast of the state. Francis' father, Francis Hugh Beaumont (Sr), doesn't seems to be in the picture most of his life since his parents divorced in 1910. His mother, Sadie, never remarried. By age 14 he was working as a Roustabout in the Oklahoma oil fields while still going to school. 
 
 In 1923 he was 18 years old and living in Detroit, Michigan and obtained a Michigan drivers license, perhaps he was going to college. He was still there in January 1928 when he had a pistol he owned pass a safety inspection. 
 
 In 1930, at age 25, he is back home and living with his mother, Sadie K Beaumont and older sister, Vivian, she was 6 years older than Francis, in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, which had been the families home of record for 20 years. Both he and his sister were employees of an unnamed oil company. His sister as a Stenographer and Francis doing 'Clerical' work, perhaps for the same oil company. Maybe the college education got him out of the oil fields an into the office. His mother died 1933. 
 
 He, also, seems to have been active or have an active interest in politics as he traveled to Washington DC several times in the 1930's. He obtained visitor passes from his state legislator to the visitors gallery to observe legislative sessions. 
 
 He also developed a love interest in a Lucile B Hoskins, a fellow Bartlesville resident, who he sent a three month newspaper subscription to for the Daily and Sunday Honolulu Advertiser. Lucile shows up in post war photos. Though there is no mention of a marriage anyplace in available documentation there is a lot of anecdotal evidence that points to that possibility. 
 
 Francis joined the Navy in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, probably the closest recruiting office to where he lived. It is noted in his records as being 'USNR' meaning he was a Navy Reservist rather than Regular Navy. Perhaps, due to his age joining the Reserves was his only option and then volunteering for active duty. It could be his job with the oil company made him draft exempt as it was a vital war industry. He was 37 at the time of his enlistment on June 15, 1942 making him one of the older men at all his commands. 
 
 Being older means he had developed a wider social life than the men just out of high school or in colleges that had entered the military. He was all ready involved in organizations like the Masons and Shriners which he continued membership and attendance in, when possible, throughout the war. We have evidence in his paperwork that on June 26, 1943 that he asked for and got one days leave while aboard the USS-Salmon to attend a Shrine ceremony in Honolulu. He continued to receive Shrine and Masonic mailings and correspondence throughout his time in the Navy. 
 
 Beaumont's first several months in the Navy seem to be a blank, most likely basic training and Torpedoman's school. He was transferred to the Receiving Station in San Francisco and then on to the submarine, USS-Pike SS-173, on December 19, 1942. He was a TM/3 at the time. Pike had been in the yards at Mare Island for an overhaul since June. She had already made 4 war patrols when he reported aboard. When Pike left the yards he rode her to Hawaii and was then transferred to ComSubDiv-21 working in relief crews on subs returning from war patrols. The USS-Pickerel SS-177 was the Flagship for ComSubDiv-21. 
 
 January 21, 1943 Beaumont, now working for ComSubDiv-44, sailed from Hawaii as a passenger aboard the USS Midway AG-41 for the Navy Base on Midway Island with verbal orders as to what duties he was to perform. There is no mention of what the “special assignment” orders were. He returned to Hawaii from Midway eight days later, on Jan 29, 1943, again, aboard the USS-Midway. 
 
 The Midway was renamed as the USS Panay AG-41 on April 3, 1943 to free up the name for the Navy's newest Aircraft Carrier. She was a commercial cargo ship leased by the U.S. Navy during World War II. She was used as a cargo ship and as a troop transport in the North Pacific Ocean. She was returned to her owner at war’s end. 
 
 He was transferred to the submarine USS Permit SS-178 at Midway from ComSubDiv-21 on March 29, 1943, he was a TM/2 by this time. Permit departed Midway on April 6, 1943 on her 8th war patrol to search for Japanese ships in the traffic lanes between the Marianas Islands and Truk Atoll in the Caroline Islands. 
 
 Permit had several encounters with the Japanese on this patrol. On May 5, at eight o'clock in the morning, from a submerged periscope attack, she fired a four torpedo spread at the Tokai Maru of 8,359 tons, resulting in one hit and damaging her. On May 11, at one o'clock in the morning, during a night surface action using her radar she attacked three ships. One was claimed to have been a 10,000 ton cargo ship the other two were thought to have been 5000 tons each. Permit claimed to have sunk the 10,000 ton vessel and one of the 5000 ton ships and damaged the other. There is no post war verification of these sinkings in this action. Permit returned to Pearl Harbor May 25, 1943. 
 
 The photo of Francis Beaumont, above, was taken on the fore deck of the Permit during this patrol. He was now 38 years old. The large rectangular blocks seen on both sides, behind him, are part of the breech mechanism for the two under deck mounted torpedo tubes installed in January 1943 at Mare Island. These tubes proved problematic and were not installed in boats beyond the few original conversions. The torpedoes were hard to maintain and there seemed to be some concern they might explode when undergoing depth charging. There are accounts of torpedoes having hot runs in these tubes. Many skippers had them removed. 
 
 The earlier fleet boats had been built with four tubes forward, instead of the six wanted by the crews and skippers, due to government efforts to try and keep costs down. The later fleet boats were built with six tubes forward starting with the Tambor Class. Being a torpedoman Beaumont would have had these tubes as part of his job aboard Permit. It is not known if he was assigned to the forward or after torpedo room. 
 
 Two days after Permit's return to port, on May 27, 1943, Beaumont was transferred back to Relief Crews at ComSubDiv-44. There is no reason given as to why he was transferred off the boat. Maybe it was that Permit and he were not a good fit or he was just filling a temporary billet. 
 
 During this time between submarines he managed to travel to the big island of Hawaii and climb to the top of the Kilauea volcano and be photographed there and receive a certificate attesting to that fact on June 16, 1943. 
 
 He remained working for either ComSubDiv-44 or ComSubDiv-21 until September 10, 1943 when he reported to his next submarine, the USS-Salmon SS-182, Lt. Cdr. Nicholas J. Nicholas in command, bound to sea for her eighth war patrol. She left Hawaii on September 27, 1943. This war patrol saw her return to the Kuril Islands where she had patrolled previously. 
 
 On this patrol she is credited with damaging two freighters. The first one was on October 15 at 2 o'clock in the afternoon on a 6000 ton cargo ship she hit with one torpedo out of seven fired in a daylight submerged periscope attack. The second attack was on October 28 at 2 o'clock in the morning while submerged using her periscope. One torpedo hit was scored from four torpedoes fired, damaging the the ex-patrol vessel Nagata Maru of 2960 tons. This patrol ended on November 17, 1943 when she returned to Pearl Harbor. Hard work for the torpedo gangs for such small returns, 11 torpedoes fired for two hits and no sinkings. 
 
 Beaumont seems to have finally found a home. The ninth war patrol for Salmon was conducted between December 15, 1943 and February 25, 1944. On January 22, 1944, about 500 miles south of Yokohama, she succeeded in damaging a tanker of approximately 4000 tons. In a submerged, evening twilight attack Salmon fired a 4-torpedo spread scoring 3 hits, but the ship did not sink. Escorts probably harassed Salmon until the ship could escape. 
 
 On April 1, 1944 Salmon, now under the command of Lt. Cdr. Harley K. Nauman, departed on her tenth war patrol from Pearl Harbor enroute to Johnston Island in company with the submarine USS Seadragon SS-194. She was assigned a special photo reconnaissance mission for this patrol which would assist in preparing plans for gaining control of the Caroline Islands. She conducted a reconnaissance of Ulithi Atoll, (which was to become a large repair and staging base for the US Navy), from April 15 to April 20; Yap from April 22nd to April 26th; and Woleai between April 28 and May 9, 1944. She returned to Pearl Harbor on May 21 with much valuable information that was utilized in last minute changes to the assault plans. 
 
 September 4, 1944 Francis Beaumont was promoted to TM/1 (T) while attached to Salmon. 
 
 Salmon's eleventh and last war patrol was to be one of heroic and epic proportions, becoming one of the legends of WW II submarine warfare. This patrol was conducted in company with submarines USS-Trigger SS-237 and USS Sterlet SS-392 as a coordinated attack group in the Ryukyu Islands. This patrol began on September 24, 1944. On October 30 , Salmon attacked a large tanker that had been previously damaged by Trigger. This attack began in the late afternoon and continued on into the night. The tanker was protected by four antisubmarine patrol vessels which were cruising back and forth around the stricken ship. 
 
 Salmon fired four torpedoes and made two good hits on the 10,500 ton Jinei Maru, but was forced to dive deep under a severe depth charge attack by the escorts. She leveled off at 300 feet but was soon forced to nearly 500 feet due to damage and additional pounding of the depth charges. The Salmon's depth gauge only went to 450 feet so depth was calculated from the sea pressure gauge readings. Unable to control leaking and maintain depth control, she battle surfaced into a clear night sky and full spotted by rain squalls, to fight for survival on the top of the ocean. It was later determined that Salmon had gone to 578 feet. 
 
 The depth charges damaged the external main engine air induction piping and it had collapsed and flooded, causing the ship to become heavy overall, and the stern diving planes jammed in 'full dive' position. About 7000 gallons of diesel fuel was lost do to a vent riser failing on Fuel Ballast Tank number 7 and the lighter fuel being replaced by heavier sea water damaging the subs neutral trim. Depth control was immediately lost and Salmon oscillated up and down several times, remaining submerged only by blowing the safety tank and by going ahead at emergency speed with a 20 degree up angle on the boat. 
 
 Seventeen minutes after the attack, with batteries depleted, the after engine room flooded almost to the level of the main motors, and still not having achieved depth control, Salmon surfaced. She never dove again. 
 
 The enemy finally noticed the Salmon in the dark about 7000 yards away but seemed wary and held their distance while assessing the situation. This gave Salmon's crew a few precious minutes to correct a bad list and to repair some of the damage. Her torpedo tubes were useless having used up all the air necessary for firing torpedoes just to reach the surface. The crew hurriedly manned the deck gun and began bringing up ammunition for it and the 40MM and 20MM guns. .30 caliber machine guns were mounted and manned. 
 
 The vessels began to close, firing at each other at great distance with little effect. The escort vessel began to close at higher speed but Salmon chose to become the aggressor and not run. Captain Nauman turned on the attackers and charged them, passing within 50 yards down the side of the attacking vessel, raking her with withering machine-gun and 20mm gunfire, also her 40mm and her 4” deck guns poured rounds into the ship as fast as the crews could load them. Later reports stated that 29 of the Japanese crew had been killed in that attack. The patrol escort vessel, IJN CD-22, came to a stop due to the damage. Salmon had come so close that the Japanese vessel could not depress her guns low enough to return fire. 
 
 Salmon then exchanged fire with a second patrol vessel which had begun her own attack but after a few rounds and hits broke off the attack and seemed to hesitate at some distance for reinforcement from the other two which were coming to the scene. Salmon began sending out plain language directions for all other subs in the vicinity to attack, giving the position of the action. Two other subs replied in plain language which was picked up by the Japanese. This probably further discouraged the enemy who, fearing the other submarines were in the area, began milling around pinging on sound gear. Salmon took advantage of a rain squall and slipped away into the dark. 
 
 Other than the damage caused by depth charges, Salmon suffered only a few small caliber hits from the enemy vessels. While stopped to repair some damage she was fired on by Japanese submarines but all missed. Sterlet and Trigger had orders to take the crew off and sink Salmon, the crew, to a man, refused to abandon ship. Escorted by Sterlet, Trigger, and USS Silversides SS-236, she made it to Saipan on three engines. She was given one third credit for a 10,500-ton tanker which was eventually sunk by a Sterlet torpedo. On November 3, 1944, she moored alongside the submarine tender USS Fulton AS-11, in Tanapag Harbor, Saipan. 
 
 On November 10, Salmon stood out from Saipan, in company with the tender Holland, and sailed via Eniwetok to Pearl Harbor. When she arrival at Pearl she created quite a commotion at the Sub Base. No one had seen a submarine with this much damage still able to float and be under her own power. The pressure hull in the after part of the Salmon was said by some to look like corrugated sheet metal. Many hull plates were dished in from the concussive force of the depth charges. After some repairs she proceeded to San Francisco and the Naval Dry docks at Hunter's Point, arriving on December 2, 1944. 
 
 There she was surveyed by the Board of Inspection and Survey a decision was made to send her to the Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N.H., for minimum damage repairs necessary to use her as a training and experimental submarine. While there in the Bay area Beaumont had his photo taken with a Chief Torpedoman, probably someone he had known from previous commands, as there is no Chief Torpedoman listed in any of the located ships manifests for that time period. 
 
 Sufficient repairs were made at Hunter's Point to render the ship seaworthy for her surface run to Portsmouth. Some machinery was overhauled and the hull above the waterline was painted. The hull and superstructure were left intact except for scrapping of the main engine air induction piping and renewal of damaged wooden decking. Salmon departed Hunter's Point, on January 27, 1945 with the submarine USS Redfish SS-395 as escort and proceeded, via the Panama Canal, to Kittery, ME where she arrived on February 17, 1945. Repairs to the damage were started being assessed immediately. The crew was moved off the submarine and all damaged equipment was assessed for repair. 
 
 After another survey on October 5, 1945, the Chief of Naval Operations, Fleet Admiral Ernest J. King, recommended a halt of further repair work and to scrap the Salmon instead. 
 
 This damage to Salmon is considered to have been one of the most serious ever inflicted on any U.S. submarine to survive during World War II. Pressure hull deformation was extensive in way of both engine rooms. 
 
 Salmon was decommissioned on September 24, 1945 at the Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. She was Struck from the Navy list on October 11, 1945. She was scrapped on April 4, 1946. 
 
 While the sub was in San Francisco, Francis was given 18 days leave and travel time beginning December 28, 1944 to go home to Bartlesville, Oklahoma to visit with his sister Vivian and friends and quite possibly Lucile Hoskins, to whom he had sent the newspaper subscription. At the end of the leave, he was to report to the USS Stickleback SS-415 at the Portsmouth Ship yard on January 15, 1945. 
 
 Most of the crew, including Francis Beaumont, were transferred from Salmon, to the USS Stickleback SS-415, which had just been placed in commission, replacing the commissioning crew. Salmon having been declared an operational loss do to the heavy battle damage and not worth repairing, the crew was rewarded with a brand new submarine for their warrior spirit. 
 
 During this turnover period to Stickleback, Beaumont had orders to the Naval Torpedo Station, Newport, RI for training on April 7, 1945. During this training time he may have been also sent to Great Lakes for some additional training. There is a photo of him and a number of other torpedomen out on the town at Eital's Old Heidelberg restaurant at 14 Randolf Street in Chicago along with some ladies. When training was completed he returned to Stickleback. 
 
 The Stickleback made one war patrol lasting just two days on station in the Sea of Japan when the war ended. She remained in the area and on August 21, 1945 sighted two bamboo rafts holding 19 survivors of a freighter, the Teihoku Maru, 5794 tons, which had been sunk 10 days before by USS Jallao SS-368. They were taken on board, the rafts pulled on to the deck aft, for 18 hours, given food, water, medical treatment, and set afloat again a short distance from one of the Japanese islands. Salmon was now performing humanitarian aid assisting fellow sailors in need since the war had ended. 
 
 September 29, 1945 Beaumont was transferred to Treasure Island to begin the process for separation from the navy as TM/1 SS. His discharge took place on October 7, 1945. 
 
 Francis Hugh Beaumont passed away on July 11, 1989 in Dallas Texas at 84 years of age. During his working years he had become an accountant. He was still active in his Masonic and Shrine lodges and traveled around the country and returned to Hawaii at least once. He was a life member of the local VFW and member of the Submarine Veterans of WW II, Dallas Chapter. He is buried at Restland Memorial Park on the northeast side of Dallas, Texas. His grave is marked by a small, plain concrete, cemetery supplied, marker much chipped by lawnmowers. We can find no data on Lucile or her passing. 
 
 Thanks you's to James Haas and Patricia Lynn for proof reading and Jim Christley for some technical details.

(New 01-20-15)