1940-1949 Torped8omen Part 2

Updated 05-28-17

Thomas Henry James Torpedoman's Mate Second Class

World War Two

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.honorstates.org/index.php?id=60112

Missing in Action USS Runner MIA Declared Missing in Action

Service Details

NAME Thomas Henry James

SERVICE # 4006163

STATE Maine

CITY Portland

COUNTY Cumberland

BORN 01-10-1921

CASUALTY 07-11-1943

WAR World War II

SERVICE Navy

SPECIALTY Torpedoman's Mate Second Class

RANK Petty Officer Second Class

UNIT USS Runner (SS-275)

LOCATION North of Hokkaido, Japan

DETAILS Missing in action, Lost at sea, Probably sunk by a mine

BURIAL Tablets of the Missing, Honolulu Memorial, Hawaii

AWARDS

Purple Heart

American Campaign Medal

World War II Victory Medal

Combat Action Ribbon

New 05-28-17

USS MURPHY: LONG SERVICE IN WARTIME WWII

http://warfarehistorynetwork.com/daily/wwii/uss-murphy-long-service-in-wartime/

Chief Torpedoman Emmett S. Wild

The destroyer USS Murphy survived a collision on the open sea and served during four amphibious operations in the European Theater.

“Like a Greyhound Bus Slamming Through a Large Plate of Glass”

Bulkoil was close to Murphy’s side. Seeing that a collision was imminent, Bailey ordered Murphy’s speed to all ahead flank and then all engines ahead emergency flank. Before Murphy could turn away, Bulkoil slammed into her port side.

Boatswain’s Mate Tom Hillard was going below when Murphy was struck. “The ship rolled to starboard,” he recalled. “I looked up [and] saw the tanker going through, some flame and sparks forward place of collision.” Some of Murphy’s crew were killed as Bulkoil cut through her midsection at a 90-degree angle, dragging her several hundred yards through the water.

ABOVE:?Commander Leonard Bailey was the USS Murphy’s first commander. TOP: Distinguished by a pair of funnels and two forward 5-inch gun mounts, the Benson-class destroyer USS Murphy is shown at sea in April 1944.

A precarious fuel line stretches from the cruiser USS Quincy to the USS Murphy while the vessels ride the waves at sea. This photo was taken from aboard the cruiser in the spring of 1944.

“Suddenly there was this loud crashing sound, like a Greyhound bus slamming through a large plate of glass,” remembered Seaman 2nd Class Frederic Sheller, on duty in Murphy’s combat information center (CIC). “The lights went out, and the emergency wall lanterns came on. Seawater began coming into the compartment.”

Murphy broke in half, her bow separating from the stern. “After we plowed through it, I saw the bow come up, the aft scraped past our starboard side,” Taylor said. “I saw a guy in the water and threw him a life ring. I was about to dive in to save this guy, but couldn’t.” Bulkoil quickly turned on its collision and running lights.

Murphy’s bow section immediately listed 90 degrees to starboard, trapping many sailors below deck while others struggled to escape.

On Murphy’s floating stern, her crew sprang into action. “Our first thoughts: Secure ship, rescue survivors in the water,” Hillard said. “I got my division topside in life jackets and started to secure hatches.” While their shipmates closed watertight doors, damage control parties put out a small fire in the forward fire room and plugged leaks in the engine room bulkhead. Other Murphy sailors threw rubber life rafts over the side to survivors, many without life jackets, swimming away from the rapidly sinking bow.

On Murphy’s bow, Sheller pulled himself outside. “As I stood up on the slanted gun mount number two, I looked down to my left and could see the phosphorous bubbles of seawater enveloping the bow as it was going down,” Sheller wrote. Heading forward, Sheller saw Bailey near the port anchor.

“The skipper had a light of some sort, shining it down into the water,” Sheller recalled. “He finally said, ‘Well boys, looks like we’ll have to get off here.’”

Sheller jumped into the water and “began to swim for all I was worth, as I could feel the pull of the bow going down.”

Ten minutes after the collision, Murphy’s bow sank, taking 38 officers and men with it and leaving her survivors struggling in the choppy sea.

“It was pitch black, and the sea was quite choppy,” Sheller recalled. “I kept swimming and floating with no way of knowing at the time if I would be rescued.” Hanging onto a fresh-water cask off a raft, Sheller paddled over to a life raft with 30 to 40 shipmates aboard and others in the water clinging to ropes. Chief Torpedoman Emmett S. Wild pulled Sheller alongside the raft, where he waited for rescue.

Abandoning Ship.....

New 05-27-17

USS Piper

Torpedoman "Stinky" Hinton

Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Launch Tag

http://webpages.charter.net/usspiper/photogallery.html

26 June 1944

Torpedoman "Stinky" Hinton with 2 Jap Prisoners

Taken August, 1945 in the Sea of Japan

Photo courtesy of John Clarkin - USS Piper 1944-1945

New 05-27-17

Flynn, Edmund F. J. (Chief Torpedoman's Mate)

USS Turner DD-648

http://www.maritimequest.com/warship_directory/us_navy_pages/destroyers/pages/uss_turner_dd_648_data.htm

Jan. 3, 1944:

Exploded and sank off Sandy Hook, New Jersey.

Notes:

Christened by Mrs. Louis E. Denfield

Named in honor of Capt. Daniel Turner, U.S.N.

Eight of Turner's crew were recommended for commendations for actions during the
sinking, they are:

Flynn, Edmund F. J. (Chief Torpedoman's Mate)

New 05-26-17

Daily Kennebec Journal Newspaper Archives

June 21, 1941 - Page 9

https://newspaperarchive.com/daily-kennebec-journal-jun-21-1941-p-9/

William 'C Wolfe chief torpedoman back arrived in Main, Vassalboro, Maine.

Bob A. Gardner, torpedoman, 3rd class

E. Krueger, torpedoman, 3rd class, San-Diego, Calif.

New 05-27-17

THE RECEIVING SHIP AT NEW YORK
PIER 92 W. 52nd STREET
NEW YORK, NEW YORK
December 5, 1941.
From: The Commanding Officer.
To: The Chief of the Bureau of Navigation.
(Detail Officer, Enlisted Personnel Section)

Subject: Personnel of U.S.S. Reuben James.

Enclosure: (A) List of Survivors of the U.S.S. Reuben James Disaster of October 31, 1941.

(B) List of Dead of the U.S.S. Reuben James Disaster of October 31, 1941.

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/ships/logs/DD/dd245-cas.html

COX, Charles Beacon, Chief Torpedoman (AA), U.S. Navy.

FLYNN, William Aloysius, Torpedoman second class, U.S. Navy.

REID, Lee Louis N., Torpedoman first class, Class V-6, U.S. Naval Reserve.

HOWARD, Robert Joseph, Torpedoman 3c, USN, #234-19-64 (Rescued)

New 05-26-17
 

Maine Genealogy Archives

Maine World War II Casualties Buried Overseas: Surnames L-P

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://archives.mainegenealogy.net/2010/01/maine-world-war-ii-casualties-buried_9667.html

Harold G. Larrabee

Chief Torpedoman's Mate, U.S. Navy

Service # 2280262

United States Navy

Entered the Service from: Maine

Died: 14-Nov-43

Missing in Action or Buried at Sea

Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery

Manila, Philippines

Awards: Purple Heart

Raymond K. McIntire

Chief Torpedoman's Mate, U.S. Navy

Service # 2085907

United States Navy

Entered the Service from: Maine

Died: 2-Feb-43

Buried at: Plot H Row 16 Grave 124

Manila American Cemetery

Manila, Philippines

Awards: Silver Star

Albert J. Otto

Torpedoman's Mate, Third Class, U.S. Navy

Service # 2088058

United States Navy

Entered the Service from: Maine

Died: 23-Jul-45

Missing in Action or Buried at Sea

Tablets of the Missing at East Coast Memorial

New York City, USA

Read Pitman

Torpedoman's Mate, Second Class, U.S. Navy

Service # 2016841

United States Navy

Entered the Service from: Maine

Died: 8-Jan-46

Missing in Action or Buried at Sea

Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery

Manila, Philippines

Awards: Purple Heart

New 05-26-17

Bair, Arthur Irvin

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.wrecksite.eu/peopleView.aspx?170751

Details

name: Bair, Arthur Irvin

age: unknown

date of death: 01/11/1943

date of birth:

type: crew

rank: Torpedoman's Mate

honours/awards:

service no.: 6642418

regiment: US Navy Reserve

unit/ship: USS Wahoo

US Navy - United States Navy

cause of loss: air raid

remarks: [Family] Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Lewis Bair, Box 654, Wibaux, Mont. [Location] Sea Of Japan, missing, date of loss November 1, 1943.

country: United States

references:

[1] Defense Pow/Mia Accounting Agency

[2] US National Archives (WWII)

entered by: Jan Lettens

last update:

Memorial

cemetery/memorial: Honolulu Memorial

grave reference:

deaths: 9286 (on this memorial)

New 05-25-17

 

WORLD WAR II NAVY, MARINE CORPS AND COAST GUARD MISSING IN ACTION OR DURING OPERATIONAL WAR MISSIONS

Source: State Summary of War Casualties from World War II for Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard Personnel from Kansas, 1946
 

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://genealogytrails.com/kan/wwiimissing.html

Boeding, Joseph Martin, Torpedoman's Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Conrad Boeding, Corning

Foster, Robert McClellan, Torpedoman's Mate 3c, USNR. Parents Mr. and Mrs. Clark T. Foster, Rt. 1, Elk Falls

New 05-25-17

In memory Torpedoman Third Class Wallace Aaron Hicks

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

https://docmia.com/d/777001
1943-1946 WWII,

Occupation of Germany, 1st Lieutenant 1951-1954
Navy

New 05-25-17

Updated 05-25-17

Bair, Arthur Irvin

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.wrecksite.eu/peopleView.aspx?170751

Details

name: Bair, Arthur Irvin

age: unknown

date of death: 01/11/1943

date of birth:

type: crew

rank: Torpedoman's Mate

honours/awards:

service no.: 6642418

regiment: US Navy Reserve

unit/ship: USS Wahoo

US Navy - United States Navy

cause of loss: air raid

remarks: [Family] Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Lewis Bair, Box 654, Wibaux, Mont. [Location] Sea Of Japan, missing, date of loss November 1, 1943.

country: United States

references:

[1] Defense Pow/Mia Accounting Agency

[2] US National Archives (WWII)

entered by: Jan Lettens

last update:

Memorial

cemetery/memorial: Honolulu Memorial

grave reference:

deaths: 9286 (on this memorial)

New 05-25-17

 

WORLD WAR II NAVY, MARINE CORPS AND COAST GUARD MISSING IN ACTION OR DURING OPERATIONAL WAR MISSIONS

Source: State Summary of War Casualties from World War II for Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard Personnel from Kansas, 1946
 

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://genealogytrails.com/kan/wwiimissing.html

Boeding, Joseph Martin, Torpedoman's Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Conrad Boeding, Corning

Foster, Robert McClellan, Torpedoman's Mate 3c, USNR. Parents Mr. and Mrs. Clark T. Foster, Rt. 1, Elk Falls

New 05-25-17

In memory Torpedoman Third Class Wallace Aaron Hicks

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

https://docmia.com/d/777001
1943-1946 WWII,

Occupation of Germany, 1st Lieutenant 1951-1954
Navy

New 05-25-17

World War 2 - United States Navy at War

UNITED STATES NAVY CASUALTIES

Part 1 - BY NAME 1941-45, CABADING to CZYZEWSKI

http://www.naval-history.net/WW2UScasaaDB-USNbyNameC.htm

CACCIATO, Diego, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CACCIATO, Diego Jr, TM3, 3684799, USN, from New York, USS Amberjack, location New Britain Island, missing, date of loss March 22, 1943 (pm)

CACCIATO, Diego, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Father, Mr. Diego Cacciato, Sr., 65 E. 4th St., New York, NY (na)

CACCIATO, Diego, TM3c, USN, Amberjack SS-219, probably February 16, 1943 (nm)

CACCIATO, Diego, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3684799, USN, from New York, Mar-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

New 05-24-17

CAHL, James Francis Peder, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CAHL, James F P, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 7257209, USN, from Illinois, Jan-44, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CAHL, James Francis Peder, TM3, USN, Flier SS-250, January 16, 1944, lost overboard off Midway (ep)

CAHL, James Francis Peder, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Violet Pearl Cahl, 152 West 158th St., South Holland, Ill (na)

New 05-24-17

CALABRESE, Richard Lawrence, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CALABRESE, Richard L, TM3, 6088334, USNR, from Pennsylvania, USS Escolar, location China Seas, missing, date of loss November 13, 1944 (pm)

CALABRESE, Richard L, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6088334, USN, from Pennsylvania, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CALABRESE, Richard, TM3c, USN, Escolar SS-294, last reported October 17, 1944, presumed lost by November 27, 1944 (nm)

CALABRESE, Richard Lawrence, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mrs. Margaret Calabrese McLaughlin, 2413 Plum St., Erie, Pa (na)

New 05-24-17

CALDWELL, Broadus Montoe, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CALDWELL, Broadus M, TM3, 6566531, USNR, from North Carolina, USS Runner, location Japan, missing, date of loss July 11, 1943 (pm)

CALDWELL, Broadus M, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6566531, USN, from North Carolina, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CALDWELL, Broadus, TM3c, USN, Runner SS-275, listed as presumed lost as of 20 July, 1943 (nm)

CALDWELL, Broadus Montoe, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Mollie Caldwell, Smyre, Gastonia, NC (na)

New 05-24-17

CALDWELL, William Thomas, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

CALDWELL, William T, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2503838, USN, from Pennsylvania, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CALDWELL, William, TM1c, USN, Escolar SS-294, last reported October 17, 1944, presumed lost by November 27, 1944 (nm)

CALDWELL, William Thomas, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Martha Cook Caldwell, 4228 Norbert Rd., Hazel Park, Royal Oak, Mich (na)

CALDWELL, W T Jr, TM1, 2503838, USN, from Pennsylvania, USS Escolar, location China Seas, missing, date of loss November 13, 1944 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CAMPILLO, Edward, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

CAMPILLO, Edward, TM3, 8174880, USNR, from Pennsylvania, USS Fiske, location North Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss August 2, 1944 (pm)

CAMPILLO, Edward, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 8174880, USN, from Pennsylvania, Aug-44, Cambridge American Cemetery (bm)

CAMPILLO, Edward, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Uncle and Aunt Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Campillo, Rt 1, Old Lincoln Highway, Langhorne, Pa (na)

New 05-24-17

CANTERBURY, Morgan James, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CANTERBURY, Morgan J, TM2, 6086163, PT-337- Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron 24, duty with MTB operations, March 6, 1944, missing, declared dead January 16, 1946 (bp)

CANTERBURY, Morgan J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6086163, USN, from New York, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CANTERBURY, Morgan James, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Salome Janette Canterbury, 138 E. Taylor St., Taylor, Pa (na)

CANTERBURY, Morgan J, TM2, 6086163, USNR, from New York, USS PT-337, location New Guinea, missing, date of loss March 7, 1944 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CAOUETTE, Armand Noel, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CAOUETTE, Armand Noel, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Agilas Caouette, Elmwood Rd., Winchendon Springs, Mass (na)

CAOUETTE, Armand, TM2c, USN, Albert W. Grant DD-649, October 25, 1944 (nm)

CARNAHAN, Ralph Ben, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carnahan, Maxwell Ave., Millersburg, Ohio (na)

New 05-24-17

CARR, Allan Harold, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CARR, Allan H, TM3, 6275145, USNR, from Indiana, USS Golet, location Japan, missing, date of loss July 12, 1944 (pm)

CARR, Allan H, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6275145, USN, from Indiana, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm) CARR, Allan, TM3c, USN, Golet SS-361, probably June 14, 1944 (nm)

CARR, Allan Harold, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert D. Carr, 1130 Westbrook St., Indianapolis, Ind (na)

New 05-24-17

CARTER, Robert Allan, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CARTER, Robert A, TM3, 7242250, USNR, from Ohio, USS Herring, location Kurile Islands, missing, date of loss July 5, 1944 (pm)

CARTER, Robert A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 7242250, USN, from Ohio, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm) CARTER, Robert, TM3c, USN, Herring SS-233, June 1, 1944 (nm)

CARTER, Robert Allan, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Lena B. Carter, 138 W. Center St., Fostoria, Ohio (na)

New 05-24-17

CARTWRIGHT, Jack Henry, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CARTWRIGHT, Jack Henry, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Father, Mr. Gerald H. Cartwright, Rt. 2, Box 4, El Paso, Tex (na)

CARTWRIGHT, Jack, TM3c, USN, Cushing DD-376, November 13, 1942 (nm)

New 05-24-17
 

CASE, Robert Fulton, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

CASE, Robert F, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3858676, USN, from Washington, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CASE, Robert, CTM, USN, Pompano SS-181, September 1943, reported presumed lost as of October 15, 1943 (nm)

CASE, Robert Fulton, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. LaVera Lorraine Case, Box 258, Castle Rock, Wash (na)

CASE, Robert F, CTMA, 3858676, USN, from Washington, USS Pompano, location Japan, missing, date of loss October 15, 1943 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CERVENY, Victor, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class

CERVENY, Victor, TM2, 6144448, USNR, from Ohio, USS Scamp, location Bonin & Volcano Islands, missing, date of loss December 5, 1944 (pm)

CERVENY, Victor, TM2c, USN, Scamp SS-277, probably November 16, 1944 (nm)

CERVENY, Victor, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6144448, USN, from Ohio, December 1945 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CERVENY, Victor, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Helen Cerveny, Rt. 1, Box 32A., Rayland, Ohio (na)

New 05-24-17

CHANDLER, Leonard Mayfield, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

CHANDLER, Leonard M, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3558099, USN, from Oklahoma, Jul-45, East Coast Memorial (bm)

CHANDLER, Leonard, CTM, USN, Dorado SS-248, probably October 12, 1943 (nm)

CHANDLER, Leonard Mayfield, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Beatrice Chandler, 529 1/2 N. W. 4th St., Oklahoma City, Okla (na)

CHANDLER, Leonard M, CTMA, 3558099, USN, from Oklahoma, USS Dorado, location Atlantic Ocean: North American Waters, missing, date of loss October 13, 1943 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CHANDLER, Leonard Mayfield, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

CHAPMAN, John F Jr, TM3, 2833639, USN, from Ohio, USS Yorktown, location Midway Island, missing, date of loss June 4, 1942 (pm)

CHAPMAN, John F, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2833639, USN, from Ohio, Jun-43, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CHANDLER, Leonard Mayfield, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Father, Mr. John Foster Chapman, Sr., 1014 W. Waterloo Rd., Akron, Ohio (na)

New 05-24-17

CHENOWETH, Joseph Gordon, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CHENOWETH, Joseph G, TM2, 3932825, USN, from Oregon, Shinyo Maru (POW ship), location Central/South Pacific Theater, missing, date of loss September 7, 1944 (pm)

CHENOWETH, Joseph G, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3932825, USN, from Oregon, Sep-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CHENOWETH, Joseph Gordon, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry W. Chenoweth, Sutherlin, Ore (Died as POW) (na)

New 05-24-17

CHILDERS, Ralph, Torpedoman's Mate First Class

CHILDERS, Ralph, TM1, 2796954, USN, from Ohio, USS Runner, location Japan, missing, date of loss July 11, 1943 (pm)

CHILDERS, Ralph, TM1c, USN, Runner SS-275, listed as presumed lost as of 20 July, 1943 (nm)

CHILDERS, Ralph, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2796954, USN, from Ohio, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CHILDERS, Ralph, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Andrew Childers, 113 Payton Ave., Irvine, Ky (na)

New 05-24-17

CHILDS, Frederick Herbert, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

CHILDS, F H Jr, TM1, 6660485, USNR, from Massachusetts, USS Albacore, location Japan, missing, date of loss December 12, 1944 (pm)

CHILDS, Frederick H, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 6660485, USN, from Massachusetts, December 1945 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CHILDS, Frederick, TM1c, USN, Albacore SS-218, November 7, 1944 (nm)

CHILDS, Frederick Herbert, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Herbert Childs, Sr., 141 Molden St., Worcester, Mass (na)

New 05-24-17

CHOMAN, John, Chief Torpedoman's Mate

CHOMAN, John, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3682806, USN, from New York, Jan-45, Manila American Cemetery (bm) + CHOMAN, John, CTM, USN, Gilligan DE-508, January 12, 1945 (nm)

CHOMAN, John, Chief Torpedo man's Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Mary Ezeh Choman, Box 13, Sheridan, Wyo (na)

CHOMAN, John, CTMA, 3682806, USN, from New York, USS Gilligan, location Philippine Sea, missing, date of loss January 12, 1945 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CHOUINARD, Robert Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

CHOUINARD, Robert J, TM1, 2018472, USN, from Massachusetts, USS Herring, location Kurile Islands, missing, date of loss July 5, 1944 (pm)

CHOUINARD, Robert J, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2018472, USN, from Massachusetts, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CHOUINARD, Robert, TM1c, USN, Herring SS-233, June 1, 1944 (nm)

CHOUINARD, Robert Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Father, Mr. Peter Joseph Chouinard, 126 Ridge St., Fall River, Mass (na)

New 05-24-17

CHRISTIAN, Duane Valdene, Torpedoman's Mate 3c

CHRISTIAN, Duane V, TM3, 5541109, USNR, from Idaho, USS Barbel, location China Seas, missing, date of loss February 18, 1945 (pm)

CHRISTIAN, Duane V, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 5541109, USN, from Idaho, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CHRISTIAN, Duane, TM3c, USN, Barbel SS-316, probably February 4, 1945 (nm)

CHRISTIAN, Duane Valdene, Torpedoman's Mate 3c, USNR. Parents. Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Christian, 151 Walnut St., Twin Falls, Idaho (Missing in action) (na)

New 05-24-17

CHRISTIAN, Richard Osborne, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CHRISTIAN, Richard O, TM3, 5640183, USNR, from California, USS Gudgeon, location Marianas Islands, missing, date of loss May 5, 1944 (pm)

CHRISTIAN, Richard O, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 5640183, USN, from California, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CHRISTIAN, Richard, TM3, USN, Gudgeon SS -211, possibly April/May 1944, presumed lost by June 7, 1944 (nm)

CHRISTIAN, Richard Osborne, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John O. Christian, 3015 Budau Ave., Los Angeles, Calif (na)

New 05-24-17

CHRISTMAN, Otto, Chief Torpedoman's Mate

CHRISTMAN, Otto, Chief Torpedoman, USN. Wife, Mrs. Emma Estia Christman, 940 W. 7th St., San Pedro, Calif (na) CHRISTMAN, Otto, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3248856, USN, from Rhode Island, Nov-42, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CHRISTMAN, Otto, CTM, USN, Juneau CL-52, November 13, 1942 (nm)

CHRISTMAN, Otto, CTMA, 3248856, USNR, from Rhode Island, USS Juneau, location Solomon Islands, missing, date of loss November 13, 1942 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CHRISTOPHERSON, Raymond Walter, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

CHRISTOPHERSON, R W, TM1, 3933778, USN, from Washington, USS Herring, location Kurile Islands, missing, date of loss July 5, 1944 (pm)

CHRISTOPHERSON, Ray'd, TM1c, USN, Herring SS-233, June 1, 1944 (nm)

CHRISTOPHERSON, Raymond W, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 3933778, USN, from Washington, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CHRISTOPHERSON, Raymond Walter, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Ida Louise Christopherson, 3828 East 17th Ave., Spokane, Wash (na)

New 05-24-17

CIFRODELLA, Joseph John, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CIFRODELLA, Joseph J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 2238292, USN, from New Jersey, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CIFRODELLA, Joseph, TM2c, USN, Escolar SS-294, last reported October 17, 1944, presumed lost by November 27, 1944 (nm)

CIFRODELLA, Joseph John, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Cifrodella, 16 Magnolia St., Belleville, NJ (na)

CIFROIELLA, Joseph J, TM2, 2238292, USN, from New Jersey, USS Escolar, location China Seas, missing, date of loss November 13, 1944 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CITARELLA, Henry, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

CITARELLA, Henry, TM3, 5633774, USNR, from California, location Marshall Islands, missing, date of loss April 7, 1944 (pm)

CITARELLA, Henry, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 5633774, USN, from California, Apr-44, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CITARELLA, Henry, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Vincenza Citarella, 4205 5th St., Riverside, Calif (na)

New 05-24-17

CLARK, Benjamin Lee, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c

CLARK, Benjamin L, TM1, 3111119, USN, from Michigan, USS Amberjack, location New Britain Island, missing, date of loss March 22, 1943 (pm)

CLARK, Benjamin Lee, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Benjamin Lee Clark, 519 Bank St., New London, Conn (na)

CLARK, Benjamin, TM1c, USN, Amberjack SS-219, probably February 16, 1943 (nm)

 CLARK, Benjeman L, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 3111119, USN, from Michigan, Mar-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

New 05-24-17

CLARK, Benjamin Lee, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c

CLAY, Joseph P, TM2, 3370369, USN, from Illinois, USS Tullibee, location Caroline Islands, missing, date of loss March 27, 1944 (pm)

CLAY, Joseph P, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3370369, USN, from Illinois, December 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CLAY, Joseph, TM2c, USN, Tullibee SS-284, March 26, 1944 (nm)

CLARK, Benjamin Lee, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Clay, 3941 No. Kostner Ave., Chicago, Ill (na)

New 05-24-17

CLIFF, James Denton, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CLIFF, James D, TM3, 6023813, USNR, from Pennsylvania, location Adriatic Sea, missing, date of loss January 24, 1944 (pm)

CLIFF, James D, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6023813, USN, from Pennsylvania, Jan-45, Sicily-Rome American Cemetery (bm)

CLIFF, James, TM3c, USN, Plunkett DD-431, January 24, 1944 (nm)

CLIFF, James Denton, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Virginia Mae Cliff, 1411 N. 14th St., Reading, Pa (na)

New 05-24-17

CLIFFORD, Everett Ray, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CLIFFORD, Everett R, TM2, 6480203, USNR, from South Dakota, USS Capelin, location Celebes, missing, date of loss December 15, 1943 (pm)

CLIFFORD, Everett R, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6480203, USN, from South Dakota, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CLIFFORD, Everett, TM2c, USN, Capelin SS-289, probably early December, 1943 (nm)

CLIFFORD, Everett Ray, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Arlene Gail Clifford, Selleck, Wash (na)

New 05-24-17

CLIFT, John Stewart, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class

CLIFT, John S, TM2, 3420214, USN, from Kansas, USS Grunion, location Aleutian Islands, missing, date of loss August 1, 1942 (pm)

CLIFT, John Stewart, Torpedoman 2c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Agnes Lorine Clift, 1130 No. Main St., Wichita, Kans (na)

CLIFT, John Stewart, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3420214, USN, from Kansas, Aug-43, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CLIFT, John, TM2, USN, Grunion SS-216, July 30, 1942 (nm)

New 05-24-17

CLINE, Cyril Arthur, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

CLINE, Cyril A, TM1, 2998256, USN, from Illinois, USS Pickerel, location Japan, missing, date of loss May 6, 1943 (pm)

CLINE, Cyril A, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2998256, USN, from Illinois, Aug-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CLINE, Cyril, TM1, USN, Pickerel SS-177, listed as MIA as of May 12, 1943 (nm)

CLINE, Cyril Arthur, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Bebe Cline, 1105 Larkin St., San Francisco, Calif (na)

New 05-24-17

CLOUSE, George Edward, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CLOUSE, George E, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6281692, USN, from Missouri, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CLOUSE, George, TM2c, USN, Lagarto SS-371, probably May 3/4, 1945 (nm)

CLOUSE, George Edward, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Beulah M. B. Clouse, Bethany, Mo (na)

New 05-24-17

COLEMAN, John Wesley, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

COLEMAN, John Wesley, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Marion Eileen Coleman, 25 Arch St., Providence, RI (na)

New 05-24-17

COLLOM, Perry Aubrey, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

COLLOM, Perry A, TM2, 6805021, USNR, from California, USS Albacore, location Japan, missing, date of loss December 12, 1944 (pm)

COLLOM, Perry A, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6805021, USN, from California, December 1945 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

COLLOM, Perry, TM2c, USN, Albacore SS-218, November 7, 1944 (nm)

COLLOM, Perry Aubrey, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Father, Mr. Home Bevel Collom, Box 327, Somerton, Ariz (na)

New 05-24-17

COLYER, Charles William, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

COLYER, Charles W, TM1, 2238201, USN, from New York, USS Capelin, location Celebes, missing, date of loss December 15, 1943 (pm)

COLYER, Charles W, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2238201, USN, from New York, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

COLYER, Charles, TM1c, USN, Capelin SS-289, probably early December, 1943 (nm)

COLYER, Charles William, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Jane Elizabeth Colyer, Lower South Washington St., Peekskill, NY (na)

New 05-24-17

CONNOR, Joseph Thomas, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CONNOR, Joseph T, TM2, 3813172, USN, from California, USS Hull, location Philippine Sea, missing, date of loss December 18, 1944 (pm)

CONNOR, Joseph T, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3813172, USN, from California, Dec-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CONNOR, Joseph, TM2c, USN, Hull DD-350, Spence DD-512 or Monaghan DD-354, December 18, 1944 (nm)

CONNOR, Joseph Thomas, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Father, Mr. Thomas Robert Joseph Connor, 4177 Cherokee Ave., San Diego, Calif (na)

New 05-24-17

CONNORS, Timothy Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CONNORS, Timothy J, TM3, 3766531, USN, from California, USS Swordfish, location Ryukyus Islands, missing, date of loss January 29, 1945 (pm)

CONNORS, Timothy J, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3766531, USN, from California, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CONNORS, Timothy, TM3c, USN, Swordfish SS-193, probably January 12, 1945 (nm)

CONNORS, Timothy Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Daniel Connors, 2324 Cabrillo St., San Francisco, Calif (na)

New 05-24-17

COOPER, Harold Eugene, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

COOPER, Harold E, TM3, 6371678, USNR, from Georgia, location Solomon Islands, missing, date of loss November 2, 1943 (pm)

COOPER, Harold E, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6371678, USN, from Georgia, Nov-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

COOPER, Harold, TM3c, USN, Foote DD-511, November 2, 1943 (nm)

COOPER, Harold Eugene, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tyranus Cooper, c/o Quartermaster Corps, Camp Wheeler, Ga (na)

New 05-24-17

CORKERY, Charles Raymond, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CORKERY, Charles R, TM2, 2440184, USN, from Pennsylvania, USS Cisco, location China Seas, missing, date of loss November 6, 1943 (pm)

CORKERY, Charles R, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 2440184, USN, from Pennsylvania, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CORKERY, Charles, TM2c, USN, Cisco SS-290, believed September 28, 1943 (nm)

CORKERY, Charles Raymond, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Margaret Mildred Corkery, 4210 Rhawn St., Philadelphia, Pa (na)

New 05-24-17

COSGROVE, Roland John, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

COSGROVE, Roland J, TM2, 6087411, USNR, from New York, USS Flier, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss August 13, 1944 (pm)

COSGROVE, Roland J, TM2, USN, Flier SS-250, August 13, 1944 (nm)

COSGROVE, Roland J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6087411, USN, from New York, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

COSGROVE, Roland John, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Lena May Cosgrove, 49 W. William St., Corning, NY (na)

New 05-24-17

COX, Charles, B., Chief Torpedoman's Mate

COX, Charles B, CTMA, 3554275, Reuben James, October 31, 1941, killed, body not recovered, dd October 31, 1941 (bp)

COX, Charles, B., Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3554275, USN, Texas, MIA, October 31, 1941, Cambridge American Cemetery (bm)

COX, Charles, CTM, USN, Reuben James DD-245, Atlantic, Oct 31, 1941, died (nm)

COX, Charles B, CTMA, 3554275, USN, from Texas, USS Reuben James, location Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss October 31, 1941 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CRAIG, Robert Anthony, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CRAIG, Robert Anthony, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Anthony Craig, Sr., 319 E. 7th St., Brooklyn, NY (na)

New 05-24-17

CRANE, Lemon Bruce, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CRANE, Lomon B, TM3, 6569571, USNR, from North Carolina, USS Tullibee, location Caroline Islands, missing, date of loss March 27, 1944 (pm)

CRANE, Lomon B, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6569571, USN, from North Carolina, December 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CRANE, Lomon, TM3c, USN, Tullibee SS-284, March 26, 1944 (nm)

CRANE, Lemon Bruce, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents Mr. And Mrs. Spencer Crane, Woodlawn Station, Lowell, NC (na)

New 05-24-17

CRISTELLO, Dominick Mike, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c

CRISTELLO, Dominick M, TM1, 2385486, USN, from Connecticut, USS Dorado, location Atlantic Ocean: North American Waters, missing, date of loss October 13, 1943 (pm)

CRISTELLO, Dominick M, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2385486, USN, from Connecticut, Jul-45, East Coast Memorial (bm)

CRISTELLO, Dominick, TM1c, USN, Dorado SS-248, probably October 12, 1943 (nm)

CRISTELLO, Dominick Mike, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Ethel Snow Cristello, 74 10th St., New London, Conn (na)

New 05-24-17

CUGNIN, Jack Eugene, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CUGNIN, Jack E, TM3, 6088791, USNR, from Pennsylvania, USS Albacore, location Japan, missing, date of loss December 12, 1944 (pm)

CUGNIN, Jack E, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6088791, USN, from Pennsylvania, December 1945 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CUGNIN, Jack, TM3c, USN, Albacore SS-218, November 7, 1944 (nm)

CUGNIN, Jack Eugene, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Paul Cugnin, 1525 Peach St., Erie, Pa (na)

New 05-24-17

CURRY, Perry Patrick, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

CURRY, Perry P, TM1, 6122494, USNR, from Ohio, USS Trigger, location Ryukyus Islands, missing, date of loss April 20, 1945 (pm)

CURRY, Perry P, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 6122494, USN, from Ohio, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CURRY, Perry, TM1c, USN, Trigger SS-237, believed March 28, 1945 (nm)

CURRY, Perry Patrick, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Marjorie May Curry, 506 S. Magnolla St., Three Oaks, Mich (na)

New 05-24-17

CUTLER, Howard Louis, Torpedoman 3c

CUTLER, Howard L, TM3, 5541797, USNR, from Idaho, USS Leopold, location North Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss March 9, 1944 (pm)

CUTLER, Howard L, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 5541797, USN, from Idaho, Mar-44, Cambridge American Cemetery (bm)

CUTLER, Howard, TM3c, USN, Leopold (USCG and crew), March 9, 1944

CUTLER, Howard Louis, Torpedoman 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Margaret Beasley Cutler, Fort Hall, Idaho (na)

New 05-24-17

World War 2 - United States Navy at War

UNITED STATES NAVY CASUALTIES

Part 1 - BY NAME 1941-45, CABADING to CZYZEWSKI

http://www.naval-history.net/WW2UScasaaDB-USNbyNameC.htm

CACCIATO, Diego, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CACCIATO, Diego Jr, TM3, 3684799, USN, from New York, USS Amberjack, location New Britain Island, missing, date of loss March 22, 1943 (pm)

CACCIATO, Diego, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Father, Mr. Diego Cacciato, Sr., 65 E. 4th St., New York, NY (na) + CACCIATO, Diego, TM3c, USN, Amberjack SS-219, probably February 16, 1943 (nm)

CACCIATO, Diego, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3684799, USN, from New York, Mar-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

New 05-24-17

CAHL, James Francis Peder, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CAHL, James F P, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 7257209, USN, from Illinois, Jan-44, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CAHL, James Francis Peder, TM3, USN, Flier SS-250, January 16, 1944, lost overboard off Midway (ep)

CAHL, James Francis Peder, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Violet Pearl Cahl, 152 West 158th St., South Holland, Ill (na)

New 05-24-17

CALABRESE, Richard Lawrence, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CALABRESE, Richard L, TM3, 6088334, USNR, from Pennsylvania, USS Escolar, location China Seas, missing, date of loss November 13, 1944 (pm)

CALABRESE, Richard L, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6088334, USN, from Pennsylvania, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CALABRESE, Richard, TM3c, USN, Escolar SS-294, last reported October 17, 1944, presumed lost by November 27, 1944 (nm)

CALABRESE, Richard Lawrence, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mrs. Margaret Calabrese McLaughlin, 2413 Plum St., Erie, Pa (na)

New 05-24-17

CALDWELL, Broadus Montoe, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CALDWELL, Broadus M, TM3, 6566531, USNR, from North Carolina, USS Runner, location Japan, missing, date of loss July 11, 1943 (pm)

CALDWELL, Broadus M, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6566531, USN, from North Carolina, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CALDWELL, Broadus, TM3c, USN, Runner SS-275, listed as presumed lost as of 20 July, 1943 (nm)

CALDWELL, Broadus Montoe, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Mollie Caldwell, Smyre, Gastonia, NC (na)

New 05-24-17

CALDWELL, William Thomas, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

CALDWELL, William T, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2503838, USN, from Pennsylvania, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CALDWELL, William, TM1c, USN, Escolar SS-294, last reported October 17, 1944, presumed lost by November 27, 1944 (nm)

CALDWELL, William Thomas, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Martha Cook Caldwell, 4228 Norbert Rd., Hazel Park, Royal Oak, Mich (na)

CALDWELL, W T Jr, TM1, 2503838, USN, from Pennsylvania, USS Escolar, location China Seas, missing, date of loss November 13, 1944 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CAMPILLO, Edward, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

CAMPILLO, Edward, TM3, 8174880, USNR, from Pennsylvania, USS Fiske, location North Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss August 2, 1944 (pm)

CAMPILLO, Edward, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 8174880, USN, from Pennsylvania, Aug-44, Cambridge American Cemetery (bm)

CAMPILLO, Edward, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Uncle and Aunt Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Campillo, Rt 1, Old Lincoln Highway, Langhorne, Pa (na)

New 05-24-17

CANTERBURY, Morgan James, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CANTERBURY, Morgan J, TM2, 6086163, PT-337- Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron 24, duty with MTB operations, March 6, 1944, missing, declared dead January 16, 1946 (bp)

CANTERBURY, Morgan J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6086163, USN, from New York, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CANTERBURY, Morgan James, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Salome Janette Canterbury, 138 E. Taylor St., Taylor, Pa (na)

CANTERBURY, Morgan J, TM2, 6086163, USNR, from New York, USS PT-337, location New Guinea, missing, date of loss March 7, 1944 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CAOUETTE, Armand Noel, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CAOUETTE, Armand Noel, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Agilas Caouette, Elmwood Rd., Winchendon Springs, Mass (na)

CAOUETTE, Armand, TM2c, USN, Albert W. Grant DD-649, October 25, 1944 (nm)

CARNAHAN, Ralph Ben, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carnahan, Maxwell Ave., Millersburg, Ohio (na)

New 05-24-17

CARR, Allan Harold, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CARR, Allan H, TM3, 6275145, USNR, from Indiana, USS Golet, location Japan, missing, date of loss July 12, 1944 (pm)

CARR, Allan H, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6275145, USN, from Indiana, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm) CARR, Allan, TM3c, USN, Golet SS-361, probably June 14, 1944 (nm)

CARR, Allan Harold, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert D. Carr, 1130 Westbrook St., Indianapolis, Ind (na)

New 05-24-17

CARTER, Robert Allan, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CARTER, Robert A, TM3, 7242250, USNR, from Ohio, USS Herring, location Kurile Islands, missing, date of loss July 5, 1944 (pm)

CARTER, Robert A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 7242250, USN, from Ohio, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm) CARTER, Robert, TM3c, USN, Herring SS-233, June 1, 1944 (nm)

CARTER, Robert Allan, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Lena B. Carter, 138 W. Center St., Fostoria, Ohio (na)

New 05-24-17

CARTWRIGHT, Jack Henry, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CARTWRIGHT, Jack Henry, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Father, Mr. Gerald H. Cartwright, Rt. 2, Box 4, El Paso, Tex (na)

CARTWRIGHT, Jack, TM3c, USN, Cushing DD-376, November 13, 1942 (nm)

New 05-24-17
 

CASE, Robert Fulton, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

CASE, Robert F, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3858676, USN, from Washington, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CASE, Robert, CTM, USN, Pompano SS-181, September 1943, reported presumed lost as of October 15, 1943 (nm)

CASE, Robert Fulton, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. LaVera Lorraine Case, Box 258, Castle Rock, Wash (na)

CASE, Robert F, CTMA, 3858676, USN, from Washington, USS Pompano, location Japan, missing, date of loss October 15, 1943 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CERVENY, Victor, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class

CERVENY, Victor, TM2, 6144448, USNR, from Ohio, USS Scamp, location Bonin & Volcano Islands, missing, date of loss December 5, 1944 (pm)

CERVENY, Victor, TM2c, USN, Scamp SS-277, probably November 16, 1944 (nm)

CERVENY, Victor, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6144448, USN, from Ohio, December 1945 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CERVENY, Victor, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Helen Cerveny, Rt. 1, Box 32A., Rayland, Ohio (na)

New 05-24-17

CHANDLER, Leonard Mayfield, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

CHANDLER, Leonard M, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3558099, USN, from Oklahoma, Jul-45, East Coast Memorial (bm)

CHANDLER, Leonard, CTM, USN, Dorado SS-248, probably October 12, 1943 (nm)

CHANDLER, Leonard Mayfield, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Beatrice Chandler, 529 1/2 N. W. 4th St., Oklahoma City, Okla (na)

CHANDLER, Leonard M, CTMA, 3558099, USN, from Oklahoma, USS Dorado, location Atlantic Ocean: North American Waters, missing, date of loss October 13, 1943 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CHANDLER, Leonard Mayfield, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

CHAPMAN, John F Jr, TM3, 2833639, USN, from Ohio, USS Yorktown, location Midway Island, missing, date of loss June 4, 1942 (pm)

CHAPMAN, John F, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2833639, USN, from Ohio, Jun-43, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CHANDLER, Leonard Mayfield, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Father, Mr. John Foster Chapman, Sr., 1014 W. Waterloo Rd., Akron, Ohio (na)

New 05-24-17

CHENOWETH, Joseph Gordon, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CHENOWETH, Joseph G, TM2, 3932825, USN, from Oregon, Shinyo Maru (POW ship), location Central/South Pacific Theater, missing, date of loss September 7, 1944 (pm)

CHENOWETH, Joseph G, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3932825, USN, from Oregon, Sep-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CHENOWETH, Joseph Gordon, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry W. Chenoweth, Sutherlin, Ore (Died as POW) (na)

New 05-24-17

CHILDERS, Ralph, Torpedoman's Mate First Class

CHILDERS, Ralph, TM1, 2796954, USN, from Ohio, USS Runner, location Japan, missing, date of loss July 11, 1943 (pm)

CHILDERS, Ralph, TM1c, USN, Runner SS-275, listed as presumed lost as of 20 July, 1943 (nm)

CHILDERS, Ralph, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2796954, USN, from Ohio, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CHILDERS, Ralph, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Andrew Childers, 113 Payton Ave., Irvine, Ky (na)

New 05-24-17

CHILDS, Frederick Herbert, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

CHILDS, F H Jr, TM1, 6660485, USNR, from Massachusetts, USS Albacore, location Japan, missing, date of loss December 12, 1944 (pm)

CHILDS, Frederick H, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 6660485, USN, from Massachusetts, December 1945 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CHILDS, Frederick, TM1c, USN, Albacore SS-218, November 7, 1944 (nm)

CHILDS, Frederick Herbert, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Herbert Childs, Sr., 141 Molden St., Worcester, Mass (na)

New 05-24-17

CHOMAN, John, Chief Torpedoman's Mate

CHOMAN, John, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3682806, USN, from New York, Jan-45, Manila American Cemetery (bm) + CHOMAN, John, CTM, USN, Gilligan DE-508, January 12, 1945 (nm)

CHOMAN, John, Chief Torpedo man's Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Mary Ezeh Choman, Box 13, Sheridan, Wyo (na)

CHOMAN, John, CTMA, 3682806, USN, from New York, USS Gilligan, location Philippine Sea, missing, date of loss January 12, 1945 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CHOUINARD, Robert Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

CHOUINARD, Robert J, TM1, 2018472, USN, from Massachusetts, USS Herring, location Kurile Islands, missing, date of loss July 5, 1944 (pm)

CHOUINARD, Robert J, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2018472, USN, from Massachusetts, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CHOUINARD, Robert, TM1c, USN, Herring SS-233, June 1, 1944 (nm)

CHOUINARD, Robert Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Father, Mr. Peter Joseph Chouinard, 126 Ridge St., Fall River, Mass (na)

New 05-24-17

CHRISTIAN, Duane Valdene, Torpedoman's Mate 3c

CHRISTIAN, Duane V, TM3, 5541109, USNR, from Idaho, USS Barbel, location China Seas, missing, date of loss February 18, 1945 (pm)

CHRISTIAN, Duane V, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 5541109, USN, from Idaho, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CHRISTIAN, Duane, TM3c, USN, Barbel SS-316, probably February 4, 1945 (nm)

CHRISTIAN, Duane Valdene, Torpedoman's Mate 3c, USNR. Parents. Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Christian, 151 Walnut St., Twin Falls, Idaho (Missing in action) (na)

New 05-24-17

CHRISTIAN, Richard Osborne, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CHRISTIAN, Richard O, TM3, 5640183, USNR, from California, USS Gudgeon, location Marianas Islands, missing, date of loss May 5, 1944 (pm)

CHRISTIAN, Richard O, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 5640183, USN, from California, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CHRISTIAN, Richard, TM3, USN, Gudgeon SS -211, possibly April/May 1944, presumed lost by June 7, 1944 (nm)

CHRISTIAN, Richard Osborne, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John O. Christian, 3015 Budau Ave., Los Angeles, Calif (na)

New 05-24-17

CHRISTMAN, Otto, Chief Torpedoman's Mate

CHRISTMAN, Otto, Chief Torpedoman, USN. Wife, Mrs. Emma Estia Christman, 940 W. 7th St., San Pedro, Calif (na) CHRISTMAN, Otto, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3248856, USN, from Rhode Island, Nov-42, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CHRISTMAN, Otto, CTM, USN, Juneau CL-52, November 13, 1942 (nm)

CHRISTMAN, Otto, CTMA, 3248856, USNR, from Rhode Island, USS Juneau, location Solomon Islands, missing, date of loss November 13, 1942 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CHRISTOPHERSON, Raymond Walter, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

CHRISTOPHERSON, R W, TM1, 3933778, USN, from Washington, USS Herring, location Kurile Islands, missing, date of loss July 5, 1944 (pm)

CHRISTOPHERSON, Ray'd, TM1c, USN, Herring SS-233, June 1, 1944 (nm)

CHRISTOPHERSON, Raymond W, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 3933778, USN, from Washington, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CHRISTOPHERSON, Raymond Walter, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Ida Louise Christopherson, 3828 East 17th Ave., Spokane, Wash (na)

New 05-24-17

CIFRODELLA, Joseph John, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CIFRODELLA, Joseph J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 2238292, USN, from New Jersey, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CIFRODELLA, Joseph, TM2c, USN, Escolar SS-294, last reported October 17, 1944, presumed lost by November 27, 1944 (nm)

CIFRODELLA, Joseph John, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Cifrodella, 16 Magnolia St., Belleville, NJ (na)

CIFROIELLA, Joseph J, TM2, 2238292, USN, from New Jersey, USS Escolar, location China Seas, missing, date of loss November 13, 1944 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CITARELLA, Henry, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

CITARELLA, Henry, TM3, 5633774, USNR, from California, location Marshall Islands, missing, date of loss April 7, 1944 (pm)

CITARELLA, Henry, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 5633774, USN, from California, Apr-44, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CITARELLA, Henry, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Vincenza Citarella, 4205 5th St., Riverside, Calif (na)

New 05-24-17

CLARK, Benjamin Lee, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c

CLARK, Benjamin L, TM1, 3111119, USN, from Michigan, USS Amberjack, location New Britain Island, missing, date of loss March 22, 1943 (pm)

CLARK, Benjamin Lee, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Benjamin Lee Clark, 519 Bank St., New London, Conn (na)

CLARK, Benjamin, TM1c, USN, Amberjack SS-219, probably February 16, 1943 (nm)

 CLARK, Benjeman L, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 3111119, USN, from Michigan, Mar-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

New 05-24-17

CLARK, Benjamin Lee, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c

CLAY, Joseph P, TM2, 3370369, USN, from Illinois, USS Tullibee, location Caroline Islands, missing, date of loss March 27, 1944 (pm)

CLAY, Joseph P, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3370369, USN, from Illinois, December 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CLAY, Joseph, TM2c, USN, Tullibee SS-284, March 26, 1944 (nm)

CLARK, Benjamin Lee, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Clay, 3941 No. Kostner Ave., Chicago, Ill (na)

New 05-24-17

CLIFF, James Denton, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CLIFF, James D, TM3, 6023813, USNR, from Pennsylvania, location Adriatic Sea, missing, date of loss January 24, 1944 (pm)

CLIFF, James D, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6023813, USN, from Pennsylvania, Jan-45, Sicily-Rome American Cemetery (bm)

CLIFF, James, TM3c, USN, Plunkett DD-431, January 24, 1944 (nm)

CLIFF, James Denton, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Virginia Mae Cliff, 1411 N. 14th St., Reading, Pa (na)

New 05-24-17

CLIFFORD, Everett Ray, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CLIFFORD, Everett R, TM2, 6480203, USNR, from South Dakota, USS Capelin, location Celebes, missing, date of loss December 15, 1943 (pm)

CLIFFORD, Everett R, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6480203, USN, from South Dakota, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CLIFFORD, Everett, TM2c, USN, Capelin SS-289, probably early December, 1943 (nm)

CLIFFORD, Everett Ray, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Arlene Gail Clifford, Selleck, Wash (na)

New 05-24-17

CLIFT, John Stewart, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class

CLIFT, John S, TM2, 3420214, USN, from Kansas, USS Grunion, location Aleutian Islands, missing, date of loss August 1, 1942 (pm)

CLIFT, John Stewart, Torpedoman 2c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Agnes Lorine Clift, 1130 No. Main St., Wichita, Kans (na)

CLIFT, John Stewart, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3420214, USN, from Kansas, Aug-43, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CLIFT, John, TM2, USN, Grunion SS-216, July 30, 1942 (nm)

New 05-24-17

CLINE, Cyril Arthur, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

CLINE, Cyril A, TM1, 2998256, USN, from Illinois, USS Pickerel, location Japan, missing, date of loss May 6, 1943 (pm)

CLINE, Cyril A, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2998256, USN, from Illinois, Aug-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CLINE, Cyril, TM1, USN, Pickerel SS-177, listed as MIA as of May 12, 1943 (nm)

CLINE, Cyril Arthur, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Bebe Cline, 1105 Larkin St., San Francisco, Calif (na)

New 05-24-17

CLOUSE, George Edward, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CLOUSE, George E, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6281692, USN, from Missouri, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CLOUSE, George, TM2c, USN, Lagarto SS-371, probably May 3/4, 1945 (nm)

CLOUSE, George Edward, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Beulah M. B. Clouse, Bethany, Mo (na)

New 05-24-17

COLEMAN, John Wesley, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

COLEMAN, John Wesley, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Marion Eileen Coleman, 25 Arch St., Providence, RI (na)

New 05-24-17

COLLOM, Perry Aubrey, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

COLLOM, Perry A, TM2, 6805021, USNR, from California, USS Albacore, location Japan, missing, date of loss December 12, 1944 (pm)

COLLOM, Perry A, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6805021, USN, from California, December 1945 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

COLLOM, Perry, TM2c, USN, Albacore SS-218, November 7, 1944 (nm)

COLLOM, Perry Aubrey, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Father, Mr. Home Bevel Collom, Box 327, Somerton, Ariz (na)

New 05-24-17

COLYER, Charles William, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

COLYER, Charles W, TM1, 2238201, USN, from New York, USS Capelin, location Celebes, missing, date of loss December 15, 1943 (pm)

COLYER, Charles W, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2238201, USN, from New York, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

COLYER, Charles, TM1c, USN, Capelin SS-289, probably early December, 1943 (nm)

COLYER, Charles William, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Jane Elizabeth Colyer, Lower South Washington St., Peekskill, NY (na)

New 05-24-17

CONNOR, Joseph Thomas, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CONNOR, Joseph T, TM2, 3813172, USN, from California, USS Hull, location Philippine Sea, missing, date of loss December 18, 1944 (pm)

CONNOR, Joseph T, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3813172, USN, from California, Dec-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CONNOR, Joseph, TM2c, USN, Hull DD-350, Spence DD-512 or Monaghan DD-354, December 18, 1944 (nm)

CONNOR, Joseph Thomas, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Father, Mr. Thomas Robert Joseph Connor, 4177 Cherokee Ave., San Diego, Calif (na)

New 05-24-17

CONNORS, Timothy Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CONNORS, Timothy J, TM3, 3766531, USN, from California, USS Swordfish, location Ryukyus Islands, missing, date of loss January 29, 1945 (pm)

CONNORS, Timothy J, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3766531, USN, from California, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CONNORS, Timothy, TM3c, USN, Swordfish SS-193, probably January 12, 1945 (nm)

CONNORS, Timothy Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Daniel Connors, 2324 Cabrillo St., San Francisco, Calif (na)

New 05-24-17

COOPER, Harold Eugene, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

COOPER, Harold E, TM3, 6371678, USNR, from Georgia, location Solomon Islands, missing, date of loss November 2, 1943 (pm)

COOPER, Harold E, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6371678, USN, from Georgia, Nov-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

COOPER, Harold, TM3c, USN, Foote DD-511, November 2, 1943 (nm)

COOPER, Harold Eugene, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tyranus Cooper, c/o Quartermaster Corps, Camp Wheeler, Ga (na)

New 05-24-17

CORKERY, Charles Raymond, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

CORKERY, Charles R, TM2, 2440184, USN, from Pennsylvania, USS Cisco, location China Seas, missing, date of loss November 6, 1943 (pm)

CORKERY, Charles R, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 2440184, USN, from Pennsylvania, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CORKERY, Charles, TM2c, USN, Cisco SS-290, believed September 28, 1943 (nm)

CORKERY, Charles Raymond, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Margaret Mildred Corkery, 4210 Rhawn St., Philadelphia, Pa (na)

New 05-24-17

COSGROVE, Roland John, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

COSGROVE, Roland J, TM2, 6087411, USNR, from New York, USS Flier, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss August 13, 1944 (pm)

COSGROVE, Roland J, TM2, USN, Flier SS-250, August 13, 1944 (nm)

COSGROVE, Roland J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6087411, USN, from New York, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

COSGROVE, Roland John, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Lena May Cosgrove, 49 W. William St., Corning, NY (na)

New 05-24-17

COX, Charles, B., Chief Torpedoman's Mate

COX, Charles B, CTMA, 3554275, Reuben James, October 31, 1941, killed, body not recovered, dd October 31, 1941 (bp)

COX, Charles, B., Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3554275, USN, Texas, MIA, October 31, 1941, Cambridge American Cemetery (bm)

COX, Charles, CTM, USN, Reuben James DD-245, Atlantic, Oct 31, 1941, died (nm)

COX, Charles B, CTMA, 3554275, USN, from Texas, USS Reuben James, location Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss October 31, 1941 (pm)

New 05-24-17

CRAIG, Robert Anthony, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CRAIG, Robert Anthony, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Anthony Craig, Sr., 319 E. 7th St., Brooklyn, NY (na)

New 05-24-17

CRANE, Lemon Bruce, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CRANE, Lomon B, TM3, 6569571, USNR, from North Carolina, USS Tullibee, location Caroline Islands, missing, date of loss March 27, 1944 (pm)

CRANE, Lomon B, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6569571, USN, from North Carolina, December 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

CRANE, Lomon, TM3c, USN, Tullibee SS-284, March 26, 1944 (nm)

CRANE, Lemon Bruce, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents Mr. And Mrs. Spencer Crane, Woodlawn Station, Lowell, NC (na)

New 05-24-17

CRISTELLO, Dominick Mike, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c

CRISTELLO, Dominick M, TM1, 2385486, USN, from Connecticut, USS Dorado, location Atlantic Ocean: North American Waters, missing, date of loss October 13, 1943 (pm)

CRISTELLO, Dominick M, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2385486, USN, from Connecticut, Jul-45, East Coast Memorial (bm)

CRISTELLO, Dominick, TM1c, USN, Dorado SS-248, probably October 12, 1943 (nm)

CRISTELLO, Dominick Mike, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Ethel Snow Cristello, 74 10th St., New London, Conn (na)

New 05-24-17

CUGNIN, Jack Eugene, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

CUGNIN, Jack E, TM3, 6088791, USNR, from Pennsylvania, USS Albacore, location Japan, missing, date of loss December 12, 1944 (pm)

CUGNIN, Jack E, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6088791, USN, from Pennsylvania, December 1945 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CUGNIN, Jack, TM3c, USN, Albacore SS-218, November 7, 1944 (nm)

CUGNIN, Jack Eugene, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Paul Cugnin, 1525 Peach St., Erie, Pa (na)

New 05-24-17

CURRY, Perry Patrick, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

CURRY, Perry P, TM1, 6122494, USNR, from Ohio, USS Trigger, location Ryukyus Islands, missing, date of loss April 20, 1945 (pm)

CURRY, Perry P, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 6122494, USN, from Ohio, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

CURRY, Perry, TM1c, USN, Trigger SS-237, believed March 28, 1945 (nm)

CURRY, Perry Patrick, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Marjorie May Curry, 506 S. Magnolla St., Three Oaks, Mich (na)

New 05-24-17

CUTLER, Howard Louis, Torpedoman 3c

CUTLER, Howard L, TM3, 5541797, USNR, from Idaho, USS Leopold, location North Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss March 9, 1944 (pm)

CUTLER, Howard L, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 5541797, USN, from Idaho, Mar-44, Cambridge American Cemetery (bm)

CUTLER, Howard, TM3c, USN, Leopold (USCG and crew), March 9, 1944

CUTLER, Howard Louis, Torpedoman 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Margaret Beasley Cutler, Fort Hall, Idaho (na)

New 05-24-17

 

World War 2 - United States Navy at War

UNITED STATES NAVY CASUALTIES

Part 1 - BY NAME 1941-45, BAAB to BYUS
 

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace


http://www.naval-history.net/WW2UScasaaDB-USNbyNAMEB.htm

BABIG, Joseph William, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

BABIG, Joseph W, TM1, 2245636, USN, from New York, USS Shark (SS-314), location China Seas, missing, date of loss October 24, 1944 (pm)

BABIG, Joseph W, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2245636, USN, from New York, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BABIG, Joseph, TM1c, USN, Shark SS-314, probably October 24, 1944 (nm)

BABIG, Joseph William, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Babig, 1241 39th St., Brooklyn, NY (na)

New 05-23-17

BAGBY, Erven Eugene Jack, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BAGBY, Erven E J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6697579, USN, from Missouri, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BAGBY, Ervin, TM2, USN, Snook SS-279, lost April/May 1945, reported presumed lost on May 16, 1945 (nm)

BAGBY, Erven Eugene Jack, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Vera Mae Bagby, 5140 Enright, St. Louis, Mo (na)

BAGBY, Erven E, TM2, 6697579, USNR, from Missouri, USS Snook, location China Seas, missing, date of loss May 5, 1945 (pm)

New 05-23-17

BAGLIA, Salvatore Charles, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BAGLIA, Salvatore C, TM3, 7064108, USS Bach (DD-470), Okinawa Assault and Occupation, May 13, 1945, (Cascode121) killed in combat, dd May 13, 1945 (bp4)

BAGLIA, Salvatore Charles, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Mariasunta Baglia, 208 Broadway, Passaic, NJ (na)

BAGLIA, Salvatore, TM3c, USN, Bache DD-470, May 13, 1945 (nm)

New 05-23-17

BAILEY, John Billy, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BAILEY, John B, TM2, 3565836, USN, from Texas, USS Robalo, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss July 2, 1944 (pm)

BAILEY, John B, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3565836, USN, from Texas, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BAILEY, John, TM2, USN, Robalo SS-273, July 26, 1944 (nm)

BAILEY, John Billy, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Bailey, c/o Givens Bros. Shoe Store, Bisbee, Ariz (na)

New 05-23-17

BAILEY, Robert Edward, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BAILEY, Robert E, TM3, 8526957, USNR, from Illinois, location Hawaiian Islands, missing, date of loss June 11, 1944 (pm)

BAILEY, Robert E, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 8526957, USN, from Illinois, Jun-44, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BAILEY, Robert Edward, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Parker Bailey, 7713 E. End Ave., Chicago, Ill (na)

New 05-23-17

BAIR, Arthur Irvin, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BAIR, Arthur I, TM3, 6642418, USNR, from Washington, USS Wahoo, location Sea Of Japan, missing, date of loss November 1, 1943 (pm)

BAIR, Arthur I, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6642418, USN, from Washington, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BAIR, Arthur, TM3c, USN, Wahoo SS-238, October 11, 1943 (nm)

BAIR, Arthur Irvin, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Lewis Bair, Box 654, Wibaux, Mont (na)

New 05-23-17

BAKER, Ervin Nathaniel, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

BAKER, Ervin N, TM1, 3560142, USN, from Arkansas, USS Grayling, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss September 24, 1943 (pm)

BAKER, Ervin N, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 3560142, USN, from Arkansas, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BAKER, Ervin, TM1c, USN, Grayling SS-209, around September 9, 1943 (nm)

BAKER, Ervin Nathaniel, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Lulu Baker, 1414 So. 4th St., Rogers, Ark (na)

New 05-23-17

BAKER, J. W., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BAKER, J W, 356 23 73, TM3c, USN, next of kin, father John W. Baker, Oklahoma City, Okla, USS Dobbin AD-3, Pearl Harbor, Dec 7, 1941, DOW (ar) (nm)

BAKER, J W, TM3, USN, WW2, died December 7, 1941, buried National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, HI (va)

BAKER, J. W., T.M. 3c, USN, USS Dobbin, Dec 7, 1941 (ph)

BAKER, J. W., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Father, Mr. John W. Baker, 115 N.W. 21st St., Oklahoma City, Okla (na)

BAKER, J. W, TM3, 3562372, USS Dobbin (AD-3), Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941, (Cascode121) killed in combat, dd December 7, 1941 (bp4)

New 05-23-17

BAKER, Lester Leroy, Torpedoman 1c

BAKER, Lester L, TM1, 3811103, USN, from Arizona, USS Pillsbury, location Java, missing, date of loss March 1, 1942 (pm)

BAKER, Lester L, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 3811103, USN, from Arizona, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BAKER, Lester, TM1c, USN, Pillsbury DD-227, March 1, 1942 (nm)

BAKER, Lester Leroy, Torpedoman 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Baker, 1648 E. 9th St., Tucson, Ariz (na)

BAKER, Lester L, TM1, 3811103, USS Pillsbury (DD-227), March 2, 1942, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd November 25, 1945 (bp6)

New 05-23-17

BALDWIN, Theodore, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

BALDWIN, Theo, TM3, 6232475, USS Glennon (DD-620), Normandy/Cherbourg Bombardment, June 8, 1944, (CasCode6421), dd June 8, 1944 (bp5)

BALDWIN, Theodore N, TM3, 6232475, USNR, from Michigan, USS Glennon, location France, missing, date of loss June 8, 1944 (pm)

BALDWIN, Theodore, TM3c, USN, Glennon DD-620, June 8, 1944 (nm)

BALDWIN, Theodore, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6232475, USN, from Michigan, Jun-44, Ardennes American Cemetery (bm)

BALDWIN, Theodore, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Katherine Baldwin, 11821 Otsego, Detroit, Mich (na)

New 05-23-17

BALFE, Donald Lace, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BALFE, Donald L, TM2, 2241517, USN, from New York, USS Escolar, location China Seas, missing, date of loss November 13, 1944 (pm)

BALFE, Donald L, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 2241517, USN, from New York, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BALFE, Donald, TM2c, USN, Escolar SS-294, last reported October 17, 1944, presumed lost by November 27, 1944 (nm)

BALFE, Donald Lace, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Balfe, 54-13 Metropolitan Ave., New York, NY (na)

New 05-23-17

BALLINGER, James W, Torpedoman's Mate First Class

BALLINGER, James W, TM1, 2946005, USNR, from Tennessee, USS Morrison, location Ryukyus Islands, missing, date of loss May 4, 1945 (pm)

BALLINGER, James W, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2946005, USN, from Tennessee, May-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BALLINGER, James, TM1c, USN, Morrison DD-560, May 4, 1945 (nm) + BALLINGER, James Walter, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Ethel May Ballinger, 1827 Cephas Ave., Nashville, Tenn (na)

BALLINGER, James W, TM1, 2946005, USS Morrison (DD-560), Okinawa Assault and Occupation, May 4, 1945, (Cascode121) killed in combat, dd May 4, 1945 (bp4)

BALLINGER, William Franklin, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

BALLINGER, William F, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3806306, USN, from Connecticut, December 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BALLINGER, William, CTM, USN, Tang SS-306, October 24, 1944 (nm)

BALLINGER, William Franklin, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Winifred Eulalia Ballinger, 1822 S. Muscatel Ave., Rosemead, Calif (na)

BALLINGER, William F, CTMP, 3806306, USN, from Connecticut, USS Tang, location Formosa, missing, date of loss October 25, 1944 (pm)

BALOG, Charles Ramon, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BALOG, Charles R, TM2, 2835871, USN, from Ohio, USS Leary, location North Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss December 24, 1943 (pm)

BALOG, Charles R, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 2835871, USN, from Ohio, Dec-44, North Africa American Cemetery (bm)

BALOG, Charles, TM2c, USN, Leary DD-158, December 24, 1943 (nm)

BALOG, Charles Ramon, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Eva Maltar Balog, 1753 E. 29th St., Lorain, Ohio (na)

BALOG, Charles R, TM2, 2835871, USS Leary (DD-158), Task Group 21.14, December 24, 1943, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd December 25, 1944 (bp5)

New 05-23-17

BARAN, John Andrew, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BARAN, John A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2837473, USN, from Ohio, Nov-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BARAN, John Andrew, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Andy Baran, 10309 Ellwell Ave., Cleveland, Ohio (na)

New 05-23-17

BARNETTE, Samuel Stephen, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

BARNETTE, Samuel S, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 6566665, USN, from North Carolina, Feb-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BARNETTE, Samuel, TM1c, USN, Bismarck Sea CVE-95, February 21, 1945 (nm)

BARNETTE, Samuel Stephen, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Mary Alta Barnette, 411 Broadway, Brevard, NC (na)

New 05-23-17

BARTON, Edward John, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

BARTON, Edward J, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 2068261, USN, from New Hampshire, Oct-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BARTON, Edward, CTM, USN, Triton SS-201, probably March 15, 1943 (nm)

BARTON, Edward John, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Constance Angeline Barton, 35 Columbia St., Portsmouth, NH (na)

BARTON, Edward J, CTMP, 2068261, USN, from New Hampshire, USS Triton, location Admiralty Islands, missing, date of loss April 8, 1943 (pm)

New 05-23-17

BATHGATE, Walter Kent Wilson, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

BATHGATE, Walter K, CTMA, 2232474, USN, from New Jersey, USS Grampus, location New Britain Island, missing, date of loss March 23, 1944 (pm)

BATHGATE, Walter Kent Wilson, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Bathgate, 5 Glen Rd., Rutherford, NJ (na)

BATHGATE, Walter K W, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 2232474, USN, from New Jersey, Jul-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BATHGATE, Walter, CTM, USN, Grampus SS-207, possibly March 5, 1943 (nm)

New 05-23-17

BAUMGARTEN, Howard F, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

BAUMGARTEN, Howard F, TM3, 3561985, USN, from Texas, USS Edsall, location Java, missing, date of loss March 1, 1942 (pm)

BAUMGARTEN, Howard F, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3561985, USN, from Texas, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BAUMGARTEN, Howard, TM3c, USN, Edsall DD-219, March 1, 1942 (nm)

 BAUMGARTEN, Howard Fritz, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Guardian, Mr. G. S. Taylor, Buckner Home, Buckner Blvd., Dallas, Tex (na)

BAUMGARTEN, Howard F, TM3, 3561985, USS Edsall (DD-219), March 1, 1942, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd November 25, 1945 (bp6)

New 05-23-17

BEATTY, Wilson Alexander, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

BEATTY, Wilson A, TM1, 6561309, USNR, from North Carolina, USS Cooper, location Central/South Pacific Theater, missing, date of loss December 3, 1944 (pm)

BEATTY, Wilson A, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 6561309, USN, from North Carolina, Dec-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

 BEATTY, Wilson, TM1c, USN, Cooper DD-695, December 3, 1944 (nm)

BEATTY, Wilson Alexander, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USNR. Parents, Mr. And Mrs. Harvie Alexander Beatty, Rt. 1, Parkersburg, NC (na)

New 05-23-17

BECK, Claude Iziah, Jr., Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

BECK, Claude I Jr, CTMP, 3806456, USN, from Texas, USS Capelin, location Celebes, missing, date of loss December 15, 1943 (pm)

BECK, Claude I, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3806456, USN, from Texas, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BECK, Claude, CTM, USN, Capelin SS-289, probably early December, 1943 (nm)

BECK, Claude Iziah, Jr., Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Theresa Clara Beck, 211 Cortland Ave., San Francisco, Calif (na)

New 05-23-17

BECKELHEIMER, George Edwin, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BECKELHEIMER, George Edwin, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Beckelheimer, 3d St., Williamsburg, Ohio (na)

BECKELHEIMER, George, TM3c, USN, Brownson DD-518, December 26, 1943 (nm)

New 05-23-17

BECKETT, Arnold Frederick, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BECKETT, Arnold Frederick, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Irving Pierce Beckett, Box 338, Craig, Colo (na)

BECKETT, Arnold Frederick, TM2, 6184072, USS PT-154, Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron 9, consolidation of Northern Solomons, November 14, 1943, (CasCode122) died of wounds, dd November 14, 1943 (bp1)

New 05-23-17

BECKWITH, Vern Charles, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BECKWITH, Vern C, Jr, TM3, 3119946, USS Gosper (APA-170), Okinawa Gunto Assault and Occupation, June 21, 1945, (CasCode131) believe died of wounds, June 22, 1945, dd June 22, 1945 (bp4)

BECKWITH, Vern Charles, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Claire Beckwith, 1035 Brentwood Rd., Jackson, Mich (na)

New 05-23-17

BEITEL, Donald Edward, Torpedoman's Mate

BEITEL, Donald E, TM2, 5645109, USS Haraden (DD-585), Mindoro Landings, December 13, 1944, (Cascode121) killed in combat, dd December 13, 1944 (bp4)

BEITEL, Donald Edward, Torpedoman's Mate, USNR. Parents, Mr and Mrs Dewey Donald, Beitel, 227 Waverly Dr., Pico, Calif (na)

New 05-23-17

BELL, Frederick Richard, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BELL, Frederick R, TM2, 3425225, USN, from Kansas, USS Grayback, location Philippine Sea, missing, date of loss March 28, 1944 (pm)

BELL, Frederick R, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3425225, USN, from Kansas, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BELL, Frederick, TM2c, USN, Grayback SS-208, February 27, 1944 (nm)

BELL, Frederick Richard, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Ruth Barbara Bell, 22 Beckwith St., New London, Conn; also Wife, Mrs. Ruth Barbara Bell, 40 Adrian Ave., West Springfield, Mass (Missing in action) (n)

New 05-23-17

BELTON, John Wesley, Torpedoman's Mate First Class

BELTON, John Wesley, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2952843, USN, from Tennessee, Aug-43, East Coast Memorial (bm)

BELTON, John, TM1c, USN, Ingraham DD-444, August 22, 1942 (nm)

BELTON, John Wesley, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Stewart, Friendship, Tenn (na)

BELTON, John W, TM1, 2952843, USN, from Tennessee, USS Ingraham, location Nova Scotia, missing, date of loss August 22, 1942 (pm)

BELTON, John W, TM1, 2952843, USS Ingraham, August 22, 1942, dd August 22, 1942 (bp1) (a)

New 05-23-17

BENJAMIN, Richard Paul, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BENJAMIN, Richard P, TM3, 6089986, USNR, from New York, USS Johnston, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss October 25, 1944 (pm)

BENJAMIN, Richard P, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6089986, USN, from New York, Oct-45, Manila American Cemetery (bm) + BENJAMIN, Richard, TM3c, USN, Johnston DD-557, October 25, 1944 (nm)

BENJAMIN, Richard Paul, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Margaret Hazel Benjamin, 266 Lake Shore Drive West, Dunkirk, NY (na)

BENJAMIN, Richard P, TM3, 6089986, USS Johnston (DD-557), Battle of Samar, October 25, 1944, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd October 26, 1945 (bp4)

New 05-23-17

BENNETT, Joseph Thomas, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BENNETT, Joseph T Jr, TM2, 6043691, USNR, from Florida, USS Leary, location North Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss December 24, 1943 (pm)

BENNETT, Joseph T, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6043691, USN, from Florida, Dec-44, North Africa American Cemetery (bm)

BENNETT, Joseph, TM2c, USN, Leary DD-158, December 24, 1943 (nm)

BENNETT, Joseph Thomas, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Thomas Bennett, Sr., 302 W 9th St., Panama City, Fla (na)

BENNETT, Joseph T, Jr, TM2, 6043691, USS Leary (DD-158), Task Group 21.14, December 24, 1943, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd December 25, 1944 (bp5)

New 05-23-17

BERIS, Richard, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

BERIS, Richard, TM3c, USN, Allen M. Sumner DD-692, January 6, 1945 (nm)

BERIS, Richard, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 8568385, USN, from Ohio, Jan-45, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BERIS, Richard, torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Beris, 3613 E. 138th St., Cleveland, Ohio (na)

New 05-23-17

BERNSTEIN, Jerome, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BERNSTEIN, Jerome, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Sylvia Helen Bernstein, 298 Scenic Dr., Knoxville, Tenn (na)

New 05-23-17

BERRESFORD, Niel T, Torpedoman's Mate First Class

BERRESFORD, Neil, TM1c, USN, Grampus SS-207, possibly March 5, 1943 (nm)

BERRESFORD, Niel T, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 3684321, USN, from Ohio, Jul-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BERRESFORD, Niel T, TM1, 3684321, USN, from Ohio, USS Grampus, location Pacific Ocean, missing, date of loss March 22, 1943 (pm)

New 05-23-17

BERRISFORD, Neil Thomas, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

BERRISFORD, Neil Thomas, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Father, Mr. Harold T. Berresford, Gen Del, Magnolia, Ohio (na)

New 05-23-17

BERRY, Frank Sisco, Torpedoman's Mate 1c

BERRY, Frank S, TM1, 3365489, USS Pillsbury (DD-227), March 2, 1942, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd November 25, 1945 (bp6)
BERRY, Frank S, TM1, 3365689, USN, from Canal Zone, USS Pillsbury, location

 Netherlands East Indies, missing, date of loss March 2, 1942 (pm)

BERRY, Frank S, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 3365689, USN, from Canal Zone, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BERRY, Frank, TM1c, USN, Pillsbury DD-227, March 1, 1942 (nm)

BERRY, Frank Sisco, Torpedoman's Mate 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Anna Mercedes Berry, Box 1798, Cristobal, Canal Zone (na)

New 05-23-17

BERRY, Warren Rawling, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

BERRY, Warren R, TM1, 3563723, USN, from Texas, USS Sculpin, location Central/South Pacific Theater, missing, date of loss November 19, 1943 (pm)

BERRY, Warren R, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 3563723, USN, from Texas, December 1945 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BERRY, Warren, TM1c, USN, Sculpin SS-191, November 19, 1943, may have been lost at sea as POW, 31 December 1943 (nm)

BERRY, Warren Rawling, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John G. Berry, 1606 Lakeland Dr., Dallas, Tex (na)

New 05-23-17

BIELUCZYK, Edward, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class

BIELUCZYK, Edward, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 2072261, USN, from Connecticut, Jul-45, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BIELUCZYK, Edward, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bieluczyk, 29 Merriam St., Meriden, Conn (na)

BIELUCZYK, Edward, TM2, 2072261, USN, from Connecticut, USS Jarvis, location Solomon Islands, missing, date of loss August 9, 1942 (pm)

BIELUCZYK, Edward, TM2, 2072261, USS Jarvis, near Savo Island, August 9, 1942, (CasCode 6221) missing, later declared dead, dd July 12, 1945 (bp1)

New 05-23-17

BIENIEWICZ, Frank Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BIENIEWICZ, Frank J, TM2, 6116387, USNR, from Indiana, USS Hoel, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss October 25, 1944 (pm)

BIENIEWICZ, Frank J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6116387, USN, from Indiana, Oct-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BIENIEWICZ, Frank, TM2c, USN, Hoel DD-533, October 25, 1944 (nm)

BIENIEWICZ, Frank Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Bieniewicz, 4616 Hickory St., Hammond, Ind (na)

BIENIEWICZ, Frank J, TM2, 6116387, USS Hoel (DD-533), Battle of Samar, October 25, 1944, (CasCode6421), dd October 25, 1944 (bp4)

New 05-23-17

BIRDSLEY, Richard Ervin, Torpedoman 2c

BIRDSLEY, Richard E, TM2, 3209413, USN, from California, USS Barton, location Solomon Islands, missing, date of loss November 13, 1942 (pm)

BIRDSLEY, Richard E, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3209413, USN, from California, Nov-43, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BIRDSLEY, Richard, TM2c, USN, Barton DD-599, November 13, 1942 (nm)

BIRDSLEY, Richard Ervin, Torpedoman 2c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Dorothy Arlene Birdsley, 261 19th Pl., Clinton, Iowa (na)

BIRDSLEY, Richard Ervin, TM2, 3209413, USS Barton (DD-599), Third Savo, November 12-15, 1942, November 13, 1942, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd November 14, 1943 (bp4)

New 05-23-17

BISOGNO, Frederick Nicholas, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BISOGNO, Frederick N, TM3, 7089422, USNR, from New York, USS Tang, location Formosa, missing, date of loss October 25, 1944 (pm)

BISOGNO, Frederick N, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 7089422, USN, from New York, December 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BISOGNO, Frederick, TM3c, USN, Tang SS-306, October 24, 1944 (nm)

BISOGNO, Frederick Nicholas, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Father, Mr. Catello R. Bisogno, 63 Herbert St., Brooklyn, NY (na)

New 05-23-17

BLACKBURN, Wilbur Burdett, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BLACKBURN, Wilbur Blackburn (?), TM2, 3421634, USS Canopus (AS-9)/Manila Bay area, Philippine Islands Campaign, went ashore April 10, 1942, killed as POW, December 14, 1944, dd December 14, 1944 (bp4/ep)

BLACKBURN, Wilbur Burdett, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Nellie Mae Worrell, Box 1, Westside, Wichita, Kans (Died as POW) (na), USN. Mother, Mrs. Nellie Mae Worrell, Box 1, Westside, Wichita, Kans (Died as POW) (na)

New 05-23-17

BLADT, Jacob Alfred, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BLADT, Jacob A, TM3, 6039290, USS Norman Scott (DD-690), Tinian Capture and Occupation, July 24, 1944, (CasCode121) killed in combat, dd July 24, 1944 (bp5)

BLADT, Jacob Alfred, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Bladt, Box 155, Glendale, Md (na)

New 05-23-17

BLAIR, James Crosier, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BLAIR, James C, TM2, 6346638, USNR, from Kentucky, USS Bush, location China Seas, missing, date of loss April 6, 1945 (pm)

BLAIR, James C, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6346638, USN, from Kentucky, Apr-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BLAIR, James Crosier, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Blair, Clarkson, Ky (na)

BLAIR, James C, TM2, 6346638, USS Bush (DD-529), Okinawa Assault and Occupation, April 6, 1945, (CasCode6421), dd April 6, 1945 (bp4)

New 05-23-17

BLANCHARD, Walter Raleigh, Chief Torpedoman

BLANCHARD, Walter R, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 2591917, USN, from Hawaii, Apr-43, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BLANCHARD, Walter, CTM, USN, Shark SS-174, February 7, 1942 (nm)

BLANCHARD, Walter Raleigh, Chief Torpedoman, USN. Wife, Mrs. Thelma Christine Blanchard, 1225-B 7th Ave., Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii (na)

BLANCHARD, Walter R, CTMP, 2591917, USN, from Hawaii, USS Shark, location Netherlands East Indies, missing, date of loss February 11, 1942 (pm)

New 05-23-17

BLANCHETTE, Walter Alexander, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BLANCHETTE, Walter A, TM3, 2019261, USN, from Rhode Island, USS Runner, location Japan, missing, date of loss July 11, 1943 (pm)

BLANCHETTE, Walter A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2019261, USN, from Rhode Island, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BLANCHETTE, Walter, TM3c, USN, Runner SS-275, listed as presumed lost as of 20 July, 1943 (nm)

BLANCHETTE, Walter Alexander, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gaspard Blanchette, 293 Gaulin Ave., Woonsocket, RI (na)

New 05-23-17

BLESSING, James Henry, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

BLESSING, James H, TM1, 2234909, USN, from New York, USS Gudgeon, location Marianas Islands, missing, date of loss May 5, 1944 (pm)

BLESSING, James H, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2234909, USN, from New York, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BLESSING, James, TM1, USN, Gudgeon SS -211, possibly April/May 1944, presumed lost by June 7, 1944 (nm)

BLESSING, James Henry, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Anna Marie Blessing, 3104 Wilkinson Ave., New York, NY (na)

New 05-23-17

BLUM, Carl, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class

BLUM, Carl, TM2, 3824922, USN, from California, USS Pompano, location Japan, missing, date of loss October 15, 1943 (pm)

BLUM, Carl, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3824922, USN, from California, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BLUM, Carl, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Renee Lois Blum, 1948 Divisadero St., San Francisco, Calif (na)

New 05-23-17

BOCKMAN, Frederick Richard, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BOCKMAN, Frederick R, TM3, 8067179, USNR, from New Hampshire, USS Newcomb, location Ryukyus Islands, missing, date of loss April 6, 1945 (pm)

BOCKMAN, Frederick R, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 8067179, USN, from New Hampshire, Apr-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BOCKMAN, Frederick Richard, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Father, Mr. Arsen Bockman, 52 Hinchey St., Berlin, NH (na)

BOCKMAN, Frederick R, TM3, 8067179, USS Newcomb (DD-586), Okinawa Assault and Occupation, April 6, 1945, (CasCode6321) killed, body recovered, dd April 6, 1945 (bp4)

New 05-23-17

BOEDING, Joseph Martin, Torpedoman's Mate 3c

BOEDING, Joseph M, TM3, 6287356, USNR, from Kansas, USS Trigger, location Ryukyus Islands, missing, date of loss April 20, 1945 (pm)

BOEDING, Joseph M, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6287356, USN, from Kansas, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BOEDING, Joseph, TM3c, USN, Trigger SS-237, believed March 28, 1945 (nm)

BOEDING, Joseph Martin, Torpedoman's Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Conrad Boeding, Corning, Kans (Missing in action) (na)

New 05-23-17

BOEHLES, Jerome Peter, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

BOEHLES, Jerome P, TM1, 2999831, USN, from Wisconsin, USS Robalo, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss July 2, 1944 (pm)

BOEHLES, Jerome P, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2999831, USN, from Wisconsin, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BOEHLES, Jerome, TM1, USN, Robalo SS-273, July 26, 1944 (nm)

BOEHLES, Jerome Peter, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Esther Boehles, 2974 N. 26th St., Milwaukee, Wis (na)

New 05-23-17

BOHIER, Robert Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BOHIER, Robert Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Steven Bohler, P.O. Box 173, Augusta, Mont (na)

BOHLER, Robert J, TM3, 3687041, USN, from Montana, USS Grampus, location New Britain Island, missing, date of loss March 22, 1943 (pm)

BOHLER, Robert, TM3c, USN, Grampus SS-207, possibly March 5, 1943 (nm)

New 05-23-17

BONNETT, James C, Torpedoman's Mate First Class

BONNETT, James C, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2504851, USN, from Pennsylvania, Feb-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

New 05-23-17

BOOKER, William Dawson, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BOOKER, William D, TM2, 6048513, USNR, from Alabama, USS Growler, location Central/South Pacific Theater, missing, date of loss November 7, 1944 (pm)

BOOKER, William D, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6048513, USN, from Alabama, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BOOKER, William, TM2c, USN, Growler SS-215, probably November 8, 1944 (nm)

BOOKER, William Dawson, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Jannite Walls Booker, Rt. 3, Box 284B, Mobile, Ala (na)

New 05-23-17

BOONE, Joseph Patrick, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BOONE, Joseph P, TM3, 6348847, USNR, from Kentucky, USS Spence, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss December 18, 1944 (pm)

BOONE, Joseph P, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6348847, USN, from Kentucky, Dec-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BOONE, Joseph, TM3c, USN, Hull DD-350, Spence DD-512 or Monaghan DD-354, December 18, 1944 (nm)

BOONE, Joseph Patrick, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Ann Boone, 2317 W. Kentucky St., Louisville, Ky (na)\

BOONE, Joseph P, TM3, 6348847, USS Spence (DD-512), 3rd Fleet off Samar, Typhoon, December 18, 1944, (pm/dd/3)

New 05-23-17

BOUCHER, Wilfred Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BOUCHER, Wilfred J, TM3, 2021265, USN, from Rhode Island, USS Tang, location Formosa, missing, date of loss October 25, 1944 (pm)

BOUCHER, Wilfred J, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2021265, USN, from Rhode Island, December 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BOUCHER, Wilfred, TM3c, USN, Tang SS-306, October 24, 1944 (nm)

BOUCHER, Wilfred Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Alice B. Boeniger, 24 Warren Ave., Warren, RI (na)

New 05-23-17

BOURQUE, Claude, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

BOURQUE, Claude, TM1, 3601230, USS Plunkett (DD-431), Anzio Landings, January 24, 1944, (CasCode121) killed in combat, dd January 24, 1944 (bp5)

BOURQUE, Claude, TM1c, USN, Plunkett DD-431, January 24, 1944 (nm)

BOURQUE, Claude, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leo Bourque, RFD, Welsh, La (na)

New 05-23-17

BOWEN, Earl Ellis, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BOWEN, Earl E, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6184853, USN, from Colorado, Mar-44, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BOWEN, Earl Ellis, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Margaret Josephine Bowen, 830 Clarkston St., Denver, Colo (na)

New 05-23-17

BOWMAN, James Willis, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BOWMAN, James W, TM3, 6449340, USS Kalk (DD-611), Biak Island, June 12, 1944, (Cascode121) killed in combat, dd June 12, 1944 (bp4)

BOWMAN, James Willis, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Dorothy Endora Bowman, 1336 Marshall St., Shreveport, La (na)

BOWMAN, James, TM3c, USN, Kalk DD-611, June 12, 1944 (nm)

New 05-23-17

BOYD, Thomas Ray, Torpedoman's Mate 1c

BOYD, Thomas R, TM1, 2725127, USN, from Alabama, USS Barbel, location China Seas, missing, date of loss February 18, 1945 (pm)

BOYD, Thomas R, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2725127, USN, from Alabama, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BOYD, Thomas, TM1c, USN, Barbel SS-316, probably February 4, 1945 (nm)

BOYD, Thomas Ray, Torpedoman's Mate 1c, USN. Father. Mr. Joseph E. Boyd, Rt. 1, Hazel Green, Ala (Missing in action) (na)

New 05-23-17

BOYNTON, Irving Cowles, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BOYNTON, Irving C, TM3, 8969879, USS Maddox (DD-731), 3rd Fleet supporting Attacks on Formosa, January 21, 1945, (Cascode121) killed in combat, dd January 21, 1945 (bp4)

BOYNTON, Irving C, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 8969879, USN, from New York, Jan-45, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BOYNTON, Irving, TM3c, USN, Maddox DD-731, January 21, 1945 (nm)

BOYNTON, Irving Cowles, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leon Guilford Boynton, 3 Thomson Ave., Glen Falls, NY (na)

New 05-23-17

BRANTLEY, Charles Lee, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

BRANTLEY, Charles L, TM3, 3563813, USN, from Texas, USS Atlanta, location Solomon Islands, missing, date of loss November 13, 1942 (pm)

BRANTLEY, Charles Lee, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3563813, USN, from Texas, Nov-42, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BRANTLEY, Charles, TM3c, USN, Atlanta CL-51, November 13, 1942 (nm)

 BRANTLEY, Charles Lee, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Katherine Brantley, 135 Mound St., Nacogdaches, Tex (na)

BRANTLEY, Charles Lee, TM3, 3563813, USS Atlanta, Third Savo, November 13, 1942, (CasCode121) killed in combat, dd November 13, 1942 (bp3)

New 05-23-17

BREAULT, Auvergne Stephen, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BREAULT, Auvergne S, TM2, 3053997, USN, from Michigan, USS Corry, location France, missing, date of loss June 6, 1944 (pm)

BREAULT, Auvergne S, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3053997, USN, from Michigan, Jun-45, Normandy American Cemetery (bm)

BREAULT, Auvergne, TM2c, USN, Corry DD-463, June 6, 1944 (nm)

BREAULT, Auvergne Stephen, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Fredrick Breault, 428 S. 14th St., Escanaba, Mich (na)

BREAULT, Auvergne S, TM2, 3053997, USS Corry (DD-465), Normandy/Cherbourg Bombardment, June 6, 1944, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd June 7, 1945 (bp5)

New 05-23-17

 BRENNAN, James Joseph, Torpedoman, 1c

BRENNAN, James J, TM1, 2072944, USN, from Connecticut, USS Herring, location Kurile Islands, missing, date of loss July 5, 1944 (pm)

BRENNAN, James J, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2072944, USN, from Connecticut, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BRENNAN, James, TM1c, USN, Herring SS-233, June 1, 1944 (nm)

BRENNAN, James Joseph, Torpedoman, 1c, USN. Sister, Mary Agnes Drager, 97 Sherman St., Norwich, Conn (na)

New 05-23-17

BRITT, Melvin Louis, Torpedoman's Mate 3c

BRITT, Melvin L, TM3, 6184585, USNR, from Nebraska, USS Tullibee, location Caroline Islands, missing, date of loss March 27, 1944 (pm)

BRITT, Melvin L, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6184585, USN, from Nebraska, December 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BRITT, Melvin, TM3c, USN, Tullibee SS-284, March 26, 1944 (nm)

BRITT, Melvin Louis, Torpedoman's Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Adelbert Britt, Rushville, Nebr (na)

New 05-23-17

BROCKMAN, Robert John, Chief Torpedoman's Mate

BROCKMAN, Robert J, CTMA, 3165298, USN, from Nebraska, USS Trout, location Philippine Sea, missing, date of loss April 7, 1944 (pm)

BROCKMAN, Robert John, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3165298, USN, from Nebraska, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BROCKMAN, Robert, CTM, USN, Trout SS-202, February 29, 1944 (nm)

BROCKMAN, Robert John, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, USN. Father, Mr. Ernest August Brockman, Whitmoyer Apts., Columbus, Nebr (na)

New 05-23-17

BROUGHTON, David Houston, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BROUGHTON, David H, TM3, 2623962, USN, from North Carolina, USS Juneau, location Solomon Islands, missing, date of loss November 13, 1942 (pm)

BROUGHTON, David H, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2623962, USN, from North Carolina, Nov-43, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BROUGHTON, David, TM3c, USN, Laffey DD-459, November 13, 1942 (nm)
BROUGHTON, David Houston, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Mother Mrs. Vera Broughton, Hertford, NC (na)

BROUGHTON, David Houston, TM3, 2623962, USS Laffey (DD-459), Third Savo, November 12-15, 1942, November 13, 1942, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd November 14, 1943 (bp4)

New 05-23-17

BROWN, Arthur Clyde, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Father, Mr. Ray Brown, Wallings, Ky (na)

New 05-23-17

BROWN, Charles Richard, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BROWN, Charles R, TM3, 3779638, USN, from California, USS Shark (SS-314), location China Seas, missing, date of loss October 24, 1944 (pm)

BROWN, Charles R, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3779638, USN, from California, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BROWN, Charles, TM3c, USN, Shark SS-314, probably October 24, 1944 (nm)

BROWN, Charles Richard, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brown, 230 Lobos St., San Francisco, Calif (na)

New 05-23-17

BROWN, Edward John, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BROWN, Edward J, TM3, 6089393, USS Laffey (DD-724), Okinawa Assault and Occupation, April 16, 1945, (Cascode121) killed in combat, dd April 16, 1945 (bp4)

BROWN, Edward J, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6089393, USN, from New York, Apr-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BROWN, Edward John, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c USNR. Mother, Mrs. Gertrude Coakley, 370 Taunton Ave., Buffalo, NY (na)

New 05-23-17

BROWN, Ellis Richard, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c
BROWN, Ellis, TM2, 3758426, USS Canopus (AS-9)/Manila Bay area, Philippine Islands Campaign, went ashore April 10, 1942, died as POW, July 4, 1942, dd July 4, 1942 (bp4/ep)
BROWN, Ellis R, TM2, 3758426, USN, from California, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss July 4, 1942 (pm)
BROWN, Ellis R, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3758426, USN, from California, Jul-42, Manila American Cemetery (bm)
BROWN, Ellis Richard, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Winifred Rogers, 3029 West St., Oakland, Calif (Died as POW) (na)

New 05-23-17

BROWN, George Kinsey, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

BROWN, George K, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2432180, USN, from Delaware, Jul-45, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BROWN, George Kinsey, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Mae Brown, P. O. Box 4888, Warrington, Fla (na)

BROWN, George K, TM1, 2432180, USN, from Delaware, USS Jarvis, location Solomon Islands, missing, date of loss August 9, 1942 (pm)

BROWN, George K, TM1, 2432180, USS Jarvis, near Savo Island, August 9, 1942, (CasCode 6221) missing, later declared dead, dd July 12, 1945 (bp1)

New 05-23-17
 

BROWN, James Thomas, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

BROWN, James T, CTMA, 2582264, USS Orestes (AGP-10), Luzon Operations, December 30, 1944, (Cascode121) killed in combat, dd December 30, 1944 (bp4)

BROWN, James Thomas, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Avanell Brown, Box 72, Sparks, Ga (na)

BROWN, James, CTM, USN, Orestes AGP-10, December 30, 1944 (nm)

New 05-23-17

BRUBECK, Fred Lee, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c

BRUBECK, Fred L, TM1, 2659959, USN, from Virginia, USS Dorado, location Atlantic Ocean: North American Waters, missing, date of loss October 13, 1943 (pm)

BRUBECK, Fred L, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2659959, USN, from Virginia, Jul-45, East Coast Memorial (bm)

BRUBECK, Fred, TM1c, USN, Dorado SS-248, probably October 12, 1943 (nm)

BRUBECK, Fred Lee, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Florence Brubeck, 839 Asylum Ave., Hartford, Conn (na)

New 05-23-17

BRUBECK, Fred Lee, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c

BRUN, Roland J, TM3, 2025747, Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron 23, consolidation of Northern Solomons, March 12, 1944, (CasCode122) died of wounds, dd March 12, 1944 (bp1)

BRUN, Roland Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Anna Brun, 149 Bullard St., New Bedford, Mass (na)

doman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brown, 230 Lobos St., San Francisco, Calif (na)

New 05-23-17

 BUCZEK, Kadzmir Joseph, Torpedoman's Mate 2c

BUCZEK, Kadzmir J, TM2, 6002056, USNR, from New York, USS Bullhead, location Netherlands East Indies, missing, date of loss August 22, 1945 (pm)

BUCZEK, Kadzmir J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6002056, USN, from New York, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BUCZEK, Kadzmir, TM2, USN, Bullhead SS-332, probably August 6, 1945 (nm)

BUCZEK, Kadzmir Joseph, Torpedoman's Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Buczek, Rt. 4, Rome, NY (Missing in action) (na)

New 05-23-17

BULLARD, Howard Marion, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BULLARD, Howard M, TM2, 6102779, USNR, from Illinois, USS S-28, location Hawaiian Islands, missing, date of loss July 4, 1944 (pm)

BULLARD, Howard M, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6102779, USN, from Illinois, Jul-44, Honolulu Memorial (bm) BULLARD, Howard, TM2, USN, S-28 SS-132, July 4, 1944 (nm)

BULLARD, Howard Marion, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Lillian Irene Bullard, 1509 1/2 Henry Ave., Manette, Wash (na)

New 05-23-17

BUNCE, George Lester, Jr., Torpedoman’s mate 3c

BUNCE, George L Jr, TM3, 6549671, USNR, from Oregon, USS Luce, location Philippine Sea, missing, date of loss May 4, 1945 (pm)

BUNCE, George L, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6549671, USN, from Oregon, May-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm) BUNCE, George, TM3c, USN, Luce DD-522, May 4, 1945 (nm)

BUNCE, George Lester, Jr., Torpedoman’s mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Lester Bunce, Sr., 4611 N.E. 31st Ave., Portland, Ore (na)

BUNCE, George L, Jr, TM3, 6549671, USS Luce (DD-522), Okinawa Assault and Occupation, May 4, 1945, (CasCode6321) killed, body recovered, dd May 4, 1945 (bp4)

New 05-23-17
BUONASSISI, Michael, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BUONASSISI, Michael, TM2, 2235172, USN, from New York, USS Sims, location Coral Sea, missing, date of loss May 7, 1942 (pm)

BUONASSISI, Michael, TM2c, USN, Sims DD-409, May 7, 1942 (nm)

BUONASSISI, Michael, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 2235172, USN, from New York, May-43, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BUONASSISI, Michael, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Father, Mr. Salvatore Buonassisi, Box 488, Katonah Rd., Katonah, NY (na)

BUONASSISI, Michael, TM2, 2235172, USS Sims (DD-409), Coral Sea, May 7, 1942, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd May 8, 1943 (bp4)

New 05-23-17

BURATTE, Austin Oliver, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

BURATTE, Austin O, TM1, 3600308, USN, from Texas, USS Cisco, location China Seas, missing, date of loss November 6, 1943 (pm)

BURATTE, Austin O, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 3600308, USN, from Texas, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BURATTE, Austin, TM1c, USN, Cisco SS-290, believed September 28, 1943 (nm)

BURATTE, Austin Oliver, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Josephine Lucille buratte, Box 115, Hondo, Tex (na)

New 05-23-17
 

BURKETT, Dallor Frank, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BURKETT, Dallor F Jr, TM3, 3566175, USN, from Oklahoma, USS Preston, location Solomon Islands, missing, date of loss November 15, 1942 (pm)

BURKETT, Dallor F, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3566175, USN, from Oklahoma, Nov-43, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BURKETT, Dallor, TM3c, USN, Suwannee CVE-27, October 25, 1944 (nm)

BURKETT, Dallor Frank, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Father, Mr. D. F. Burkett, Sr., 843 N. Birmingham Pl., Tulsa, Okla (na)

BURKETT, Dallor Frank, Jr, TM3, 3566175, USS Preston (DD-379), Third Savo, November 12-15, 1942, November 15, 1942, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd November 16, 1943 (bp4)

New 05-23-17

BURNS, Daniel James, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

BURNS, Dan J, TM2, 6062715, USS Mannert L Abele (DD-733), Okinawa Assault and Occupation, April 12, 1945, (CasCode6421), dd April 12, 1945 (bp4)

BURNS, Daniel J, TM2, 6062715, USNR, from Massachusetts, USS Mannert L. Abele, location China Seas, missing, date of loss April 12, 1945 (pm)

BURNS, Daniel J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6062715, USN, from Massachusetts, Oct-45, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BURNS, Daniel James, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Ruth Burns, 1218 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Boston, Mass (na)

New 05-23-17

BURNS, Richard Brammall, Chief Torpedoman's Mate

BURNS, Richard B, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 2125113, USN, from Vermont, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BURNS, Richard, CTM, USN, Bullhead SS-332, probably August 6, 1945 (nm)

BURNS, Richard Brammall, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Florence J. Burns, 19 Grand St., New London, Conn (Missing in action) (na)

BURNS, Richard B, CTMA, 2125113, USN, from Vermont, USS Bullhead, location Netherlands East Indies, missing, date of loss August 22, 1945 (pm)

New 05-23-17

BUTOR, Joseph Alfred, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

BUTOR, Joseph A, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3112768, USN, from Michigan, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

BUTOR, Joseph, CTM, USN, Golet SS-361, probably June 14, 1944 (nm)

BUTOR, Joseph Alfred, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Butor, Rt. 3, Box 96, Hesperia, Mich (na)

BUTOR, Joseph A, CTMA, 3112768, USN, from Michigan, USS Golet, location Japan, missing, date of loss July 12, 1944 (pm)

New 05-23-17

BUXTON, Norman Allen, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

BUXTON, Norman A, TM3, 6079790, USN, from Massachusetts, USS Turner, location Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss January 3, 1944 (pm)

BUXTON, Norman A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6079790, USN, from Massachusetts, Jan-44, East Coast Memorial (bm)

BUXTON, Norman, TM3c, USN, Turner DD-648, January 3, 1944 (nm)

BUXTON, Norman Allen, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Myrtle Elissa Buxton, 120 Parker St., New Bedford, Mass (na)

BUXTON, Norman A, TM3, 6079790, USS Turner (DD-648), off New York, explosion, January 3, 1944, dd January 4, 1948 (bp6)

New 05-23-17

World War 2 - United States Navy at War

UNITED STATES NAVY CASUALTIES

Part 1 - BY NAME 1941-1945, AAB to AYTONA

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://www.naval-history.net/WW2UScasaaDB-USNbyNAMEA.htm

ABBOTT, Oscar Allen, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

ABBOTT, Oscar A, TM3, 5557399, USNR, from Arizona, USS Gudgeon, location Pacific Ocean, missing, date of loss May 5, 1944 (pm)

ABBOTT, Oscar A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 5557399, USN, from Arizona, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

ABBOTT, Oscar, TM3, USN, Gudgeon SS -211, possibly April/May 1944, presumed lost by June 7, 1944 (nm)

ABBOTT, Oscar Allen, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother Mrs. Isabel Twisdale, Rt. 5, Henderson, NC (na)

New 05-22-17

ABEL, John Henry, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

ABEL, John H, TM1, 2999745, USN, from Illinois, USS Growler, location China Seas, missing, date of loss November 7, 1944 (pm)

ABEL, John H, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2999745, USN, from Illinois, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

ABEL, John, TM1c, USN, Growler SS-215, probably November 8, 1944 (nm)

ABEL, John Henry, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Carl Abel, 545 South Spencer St., Aurora, Ill (na)

New 05-22-17

ADAIR, Roy, Torpedoman First Class

ADAIR, Roy, Torpedoman First Class, USN, from Aug-42, Corozal American Cemetery (bm)

ADAIR, Roy, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Roy Adair, 227 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, Fla (na)

ADAMS, Roy Clyde, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

ADAMS, Roy C, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 322377, USN, from California, Jun-44, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

ADAMS, Roy Clyde, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Marguerite Josephine Adams, 3512 Crown Point Dr., Pacific Beach, Calif (na)

ADAMS, Roy C, CWO, 322377, USN, from California, location Hawaiian Islands, missing, date of loss June 11, 1944 (pm)

New 05-22-17
ADCOCK, Henry K, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

ADCOCK, Henry K, TM1, 6308785, USS Johnston (DD-557), Battle of Samar, October 25, 1944, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd October 26, 1945 (bp4)

ADCOCK, Henry K, TM3, 6308785, USNR, from Arkansas, USS Johnston, location Philippine Sea, missing, date of loss October 25, 1944 (pm)

ADCOCK, Henry K, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6308785, USN, from Arkansas, Oct-45, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

ADCOCK, Henry, TM3c, USN, Johnston DD-557, October 25, 1944 (nm) + ADCOCK, Henry Kenneth, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Wade Adcock, R. F. D. 1, Parkdale, Ark

New 05-22-17

ADDY, Theodore Thomas, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

ADDY, Theodore T, TM2, 3114484, USN, from Ohio, USS Dorado, location Atlantic Ocean: North American Waters, missing, date of loss October 13, 1943 (pm)

ADDY, Theodore T, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3114484, USN, from Ohio, Jul-45, East Coast Memorial (bm)

ADDY, Theodore, TM2c, USN, Dorado SS-248, probably October 12, 1943 (nm)

ADDY, Theodore Thomas, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Father, Mr. Theodore K. Addy, 141 S. Water St., Coshocton, Ohio (na)

New 05-22-17

 

ALAI, John, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

BALAI, John, TM3, 3000281, USN, from Illinois, USS Monssen, location Pacific Ocean, missing, date of loss November 13, 1942 (pm)

BALAI, John, TM3c, USN, Monssen DD-436, November 13, 1942 (nm)

BALAI, John, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3000281, USN, from Illinois, Nov-43, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

BALAI, John, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Father, Mr. Vincent Balai, 2242 North Maplewood Ave., Chicago, Ill (na)

BALAI, John, TM3, 3000281, USS Monssen (DD-436), Third Savo, November 12-15, 1942, November 13, 1942, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd November 14, 1943 (bp4)

New 05-22-17

ALARIE, Earl Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

ALARIE, Earl J, TM3, 2127466, USN, from Massachusetts, USS Spence, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss December 18, 1944 (pm)

ALARIE, Earl J, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2127466, USN, from Massachusetts, Dec-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

ALARIE, Earl, TM3c, USN, Hull DD-350, Spence DD-512 or Monaghan DD-354, December 18, 1944 (nm)

ALARIE, Earl Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Alarie, 33 Pond St., Webster, Mass (na)

New 05-22-17

ALLISON, John Edward, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

ALLISON, John E, Jr, TM3, 6557442, USS Kalk (DD-611), Biak Island, June 12, 1944, (Cascode121) killed in combat, dd June 12, 1944 (bp4)

ALLISON, John Edward, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Clara C. Allison, 615 Crystal Ct., Long Beach, Calif (na)

ALLISON, John, TM3c, USN, Kalk DD-611, June 12, 1944 (nm)

ALARIE, Earl J, TM3, 2127466, USS Spence (DD-512), 3rd Fleet off Samar, Typhoon, December 18, 1944, (pm/dd/3)

New 05-22-17

ANDERSON, Harry Earl, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

ANDERSON, Harry E, TM2, 6384512, USNR, from Minnesota, USS Scamp, location Bonin & Volcano Islands, missing, date of loss December 5, 1944 (pm)

ANDERSON, Harry E, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6384512, USN, from Minnesota, December 1945 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

ANDERSON, Harry, TM2c, USN, Scamp SS-277, probably November 16, 1944 (nm)

ANDERSON, Harry Earl, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Oma Jean Anderson, 356 N. Cleveland Ave., St. Paul, Minn (na)

New 05-22-17

ANDERSON, Phillip Edward, Torpedoman's Mate 3c

ANDERSON, Phillip E, TM3, 6223678, USNR, from Michigan, USS Tang, location Formosa, missing, date of loss October 25, 1944 (pm)

ANDERSON, Phillip E, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6223678, USN, from Michigan, December 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

ANDERSON, Phillip, TM3c, USN, Tang SS-306, October 24, 1944 (nm)

ANDERSON, Phillip Edward, Torpedoman's Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Marion Scotland Anderson, 713 Front St., Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (na)

New 05-22-17

ANDERSON, Victor John, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

ANDERSON, Victor J, TM2, 3117567, USN, from Michigan, USS Flier, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss August 13, 1944 (pm)

ANDERSON, Victor J, TM2, USN, Flier SS-250, August 13, 1944 (nm)

ANDERSON, Victor J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3117567, USN, from Michigan, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

ANDERSON, Victor John, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Ann Anderson, 2340 Cherry St., Box 442, Keego Harbor, Mich (na)

New 05-22-17

ANDERSON, William Robert, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

ANDERSON, William R, TM3, 2432900, USN, from Pennsylvania, USS Tullibee, location Caroline Islands, missing, date of loss March 27, 1944 (pm)

ANDERSON, William R, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2432900, USN, from Pennsylvania, December 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

ANDERSON, William, TM3c, USN, Tullibee SS-284, March 26, 1944 (nm)

ANDERSON, William Robert, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Geraldine Margaret Anderson, 64 Extension St., Mansfield, Pa (na)

New 05-22-17

ANDREWS, Harold Doyle, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

ANDREWS, Harold D, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 2914753, USN, from Missouri, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

ANDREWS, Harold, CTM, USN, Lagarto SS-371, probably May 3/4, 1945 (nm)

ANDREWS, Harold Doyle, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Emma Nell Andrews, Malden, Mo (na)

New 05-22-17

ANDRO, Herbert Paul, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

ANDRO, Herbert P, TM2, 6328674, USNR, from California, USS Buck, location Tyrrhenian Sea, missing, date of loss October 9, 1943 (pm)

ANDRO, Herbert P, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6328674, USN, from California, Oct-44, Sicily-Rome American Cemetery (bm)

ANDRO, Herbert, TM2c, USN, Buck DD-420, October 9, 1943 (nm)

ANDRO, Herbert Paul, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Andro, 213 W. 40th Pl., Los Angeles, Calif (na)

ANDRO, Herbert P, TM2, USS Buck (DD-420), torpedoed off Salerno, October 9, 1943, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd October 10, 1944 (bp5)

New 05-22-17

ANTHONY, Bruce Louie, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

ANTHONY, Bruce L, TM3, 6485917, USNR, from Nebraska, USS Dorado, location Atlantic Ocean: North American Waters, missing, date of loss October 13, 1943 (pm)

ANTHONY, Bruce L, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6485917, USN, from Nebraska, Jul-45, East Coast Memorial (bm)

ANTHONY, Bruce, TM3c, USN, Dorado SS-248, probably October 12, 1943 (nm)

ANTHONY, Bruce Louie, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Gertrude Mae Renner, Rt. 3, Box 47, Stromsburg, Nebr (na)

New 05-22-17

ARMSTRONG, William Franklin, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

ARMSTRONG, William F, TM3, 8409892, USNR, from Texas, USS Morrison, location Ryukyus Islands, missing, date of loss May 4, 1945 (pm)

ARMSTRONG, William F, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 8409892, USN, from Texas, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

ARMSTRONG, William, TM3c, USN, Morrison DD-560, May 4, 1945 (nm)

ARMSTRONG, William Franklin, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Armstrong, Gen. Del., Munday, Tex (na)

New 05-22-17

ATKINSON, Russell, Jr.,  Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

ATKINSON, Russell Jr, TM3, 8467655, USNR, from Louisiana, USS Pringle, location China Seas, missing, date of loss April 16, 1945 (pm)

ATKINSON, Russell, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Russell Atkinson, Sr., 1515 Concrete Dr., Baton Rouge, La (na)

ATKINSON, Russell, Jr., Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 8467655, USN, from Louisiana, Apr-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

ATKINSON, Russell, Jr., TM3, 8467655, USS Pringle (DD-477), Okinawa Assault and Occupation, April 16, 1945, (CasCode6421), dd April 16, 1945 (bp4)

New 05-22-17

AUTREY, Benjamin Franklin, Torpedoman

AUTREY, Benjamin Franklin, Torpedoman, USN. Wife, Mrs. Anisia Alexandrova Autrey, 4642 Natalie Dr., San Diego., Calif (Later address: 109-A Surfside Colony.) (na)

AUTREY, Benjamin F, WO, 201776, USN, from Georgia, USS Canopus / Arisan Maru (POW ship), location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss October 24, 1944 (pm)

AUTREY, Benjamin F, CSK, 201776, Fort Mills, Corregidor, PI, Philippines, captured May 6, 1942, (POWCascode8421) died in POW ship/ died as POW October 24, 1944, dd October 24, 1944 (bp4)

New 05-22-17

World War 2 - United States Navy at War

UNITED STATES NAVY CASUALTIES

Part 1 - BY NAME 1941-45, LA BARR to LYTTON

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://www.naval-history.net/WW2UScasaaDB-USNbyNameL.htm

LACASSE, David A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

LACASSE, David A, TM3, 6665806, USNR, from Massachusetts, USS Cisco, location China Seas, missing, date of loss November 6, 1943 (pm)

LACASSE, David A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6665806, USN, from Massachusetts, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

 LACASSE, David, TM3c, USN, Cisco SS-290, believed September 28, 1943 (nm)

LACASSE, David Anthony, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred J. Lacasse, 41 River Park Ave., Williamsett, Holyoke, Mass (na)

New 05-21-17

LADERBUSH, George Robert, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

LADERBUSH, George R, TM2, 5730744, USN, from New Hampshire, USS Flier, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss August 13, 1944 (pm)

LADERBUSH, George R, TM2, USN, Flier SS-250, August 13, 1944 (nm)

LADERBUSH, George R, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 5730744, USN, from New Hampshire, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LADERBUSH, George Robert, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Laderbush, 187 McDonough St., Portsmouth, NH (na)

New 05-21-17

LADZINSKI, Reginald A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

LADZINSKI, Reginald A, TM3, 2244479, USN, from New York, USS Lansdale, location Mediterranean Sea, missing, date of loss April 20, 1944 (pm)

LADZINSKI, Reginald A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2244479, USN, from New York, Apr-45, North Africa American Cemetery (bm)

LADZINSKI, Reginald Aloysius, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Ladzinski, 56 Taylor Ave., Poughkeepsie, NY (na)

LADZINSKI, Reginald A, TM3, 2244479, USS Lansdale (DD-426), convoy UGS-38, April 20, 1944, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd April 21, 1945 (bp5)

New 05-21-17

LAMBERT, Richard A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

LAMBERT, Richard A, TM3, 2835693, USN, from Ohio, USS Flier, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss August 13, 1944 (pm)

LAMBERT, Richard A, TM3, USN, Flier SS-250, August 13, 1944 (nm)

LAMBERT, Richard A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2835693, USN, from Ohio, 1946 (WW2), anila American Cemetery (bm)

LAMBERT, Richard Anthony, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Mother Mrs. Nancy Lambert, 1604 Jefferson St., Warren, Ohio (na)

New 05-21-17

LADZINSKI, Reginald Aloysius, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LADZINSKI, Reginald A, TM3, 2244479, USN, from New York, USS Lansdale, location Mediterranean Sea, missing, date of loss April 20, 1944 (pm)

LADZINSKI, Reginald A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2244479, USN, from New York, Apr-45, North Africa American Cemetery (bm)

LADZINSKI, Reginald Aloysius, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Ladzinski, 56 Taylor Ave., Poughkeepsie, NY (na)

LADZINSKI, Reginald A, TM3, 2244479, USS Lansdale (DD-426), convoy UGS-38, April 20, 1944, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd April 21, 1945 (bp5)

New 05-21-17

LAMBERT, Richard A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

 LAMBERT, Richard A, TM3, 2835693, USN, from Ohio, USS Flier, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss August 13, 1944 (pm)

LAMBERT, Richard A, TM3, USN, Flier SS-250, August 13, 1944 (nm)

LAMBERT, Richard A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2835693, USN, from Ohio, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LAMBERT, Richard Anthony, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Mother Mrs. Nancy Lambert, 1604 Jefferson St., Warren, Ohio (na)

New 05-21-17

LAMPTON, Alvin Leroy, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LAMPTON, Alvin L, TM3, 3724906, USN, from Colorado, USS Liscome Bay, location Gilbert Islands, missing, date of loss November 24, 1943 (pm)

LAMPTON, Alvin L, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3724906, USN, from Colorado, Nov-44, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LAMPTON, Alvin, TM3c, USN, Liscome Bay CVE-56, November 24, 1943 (nm)

LAMPTON, Alvin Leroy, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Thelma Louise Martin, Westminster, Colo (na)

New 05-21-17

LANE, Roy James, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LANE, Roy J, TM3, 6165762, USNR, from Texas, location Tyrrhenian Sea, missing, date of loss September 11, 1943 (pm)

6165762, USN, from Texas, Sep-44, Sicily-Rome American Cemetery (bm)
LANE, Roy James, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Mary C. Lane, McCamey, Tex (na)

LANE, Roy J, TM3, 6165762, USS Rhind (DD-404), Salerno Landings, September 11, 1943, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd September 12, 1944 (bp5)

New 05-21-17

LANGDON, Charles N, Torpedoman's Mate First Class

LANGDON, Charles N, TM1, 6622907, USNR, from California, USS Scamp, location Bonin & Volcano Islands, missing, date of loss December 5, 1944 (pm)

LANGDON, Charles N, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 6622907, USN, from California, December 1945 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LANGDON, Charles, TM1c, USN, Scamp SS-277, probably November 16, 1944 (nm)

LANGDON, Charles Norman, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USNR. Father, Mr. Norman E. Langdon, Marshalltown, Iowa (na)

New 05-21-17

LANGE, Salvatore Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LANGE, Salvatore J, TM3, 8515925, USNR, from Illinois, USS Barbel, location China Seas, missing, date of loss February 18, 1945 (pm)

]LANGE, Salvatore J, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 8515925, USN, from Illinois, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LANGE, Salvatore, TM3c, USN, Barbel SS-316, probably February 4, 1945 (nm)
LANGE, Salvatore Joseph, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Brother, Mr. Joseph Richard Lange, 5617 So. May St., Chicago, Ill (na)

New 05-21-17

LANKFORD, James Robert, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LANKFORD, James R, TM3, 3762553, USN, from California, USS Rowan, location Tyrrhenian Sea, missing, date of loss September 11, 1943 (pm)

LANKFORD, James R, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3762553, USN, from California, Sep-44, Sicily-Rome American Cemetery (bm)

LANKFORD, James, TM3c, USN, Rowan DD-405, September 11, 1943 (nm)

LANKFORD, James Robert, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Emma Lankford, 643 Ash St., Newark, Calif (na)

 LANKFORD, James R, TM3, 3762553, USS Rowan (DD-405), Salerno Landings, September 11, 1943, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd September 12, 1944 (bp5)

New 05-21-17

LARKIN, John Edward, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LARKIN, John E, TM3, 1804120, USNR, from Massachusetts, location Adriatic Sea, missing, date of loss January 24, 1944 (pm)

LARKIN, John E, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 1804120, USN, from Massachusetts, Jan-45, Sicily-Rome American Cemetery (bm)

LARKIN, John Edward, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Ruth Helen Larkin, 6 Albemarle St., Boston, Mass (na)

LARKIN, John E, TM3, 1804120, USS Plunkett (DD-431), Anzio Landings, January 24, 1944, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd January 25, 1945 (bp5)

New 05-21-17

LARRABEE, Harold G, Chief Torpedoman's Mate

LARRABEE, Harold G, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 2280262, USN, from Maine, Nov-43, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LARRABEE, Harold, CTM, USN, Barton DD-599, November 13, 1942 (nm)

LARRABEE, Harold Gilbert, Chief Torpedoman, USN. Wife, Mrs. Florinda Lucille Larrabee, 1402 Fall River Ave., Seekonk, Mass (na)

LARRABEE, Harold G, CTMP, 2280262, USN, from Maine, USS Barton, location Solomon Islands, missing, date of loss November 13, 1942 (pm)

LARRABEE, Harold Gilbert, CTMP, 280262, USS Barton (DD-599), Third Savo, November 12-15, 1942, November 13, 1942, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd November 14, 1943 (bp4)

New 05-21-17

LASS, John H, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

LASS, John H Jr, TM3, 3062358, USN, from Wisconsin, USS Newcomb, location Ryukyus Islands, missing, date of loss April 6, 1945 (pm)

LASS, John H, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3062358, USN, from Wisconsin, Apr-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LASS, John Henry, Jr., Torpedoman’sMate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Henry Lass, Sr., 925 Lincoln Ave., Waukesha, Wis (na)

LASS, John H, Jr, TM3, 3062358, USS Newcomb (DD-586), Okinawa Assault and Occupation, April 6, 1945, (CasCode6321) killed, body recovered, dd April 6, 1945 (bp4)

New 05-21-17

LAUDER, Guy E, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class

LAUDER, Guy E, TM2, 3371047, USN, from Illinois, USS Argonaut, location New Britain Island, missing, date of loss January 10, 1943 (pm)

LAUDER, Guy E, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3371047, USN, from Illinois, Jan-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LAUDER, Guy, TM2c, USN, Argonaut SM-1, January 10, 1943 (nm)

LAUDER, Guy Edwin, Torpedoman 2c, USN. Father, Mrs. William Lauder, 402 3rd St., Peoria, Ill (na)

New 05-21-17

LAWLER, William J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class

LAWLER, William J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3757094, USN, from California, Aug-43, East Coast Memorial (bm)

LAWLER, William, TM2c, USN, Ingraham DD-444, August 22, 1942 (nm)

LAWLER, William Jennings, Torpedoman 2c, USN. Father, Mr. James Sanford Lawler, River Route, Box 40, Madera, Calif (na)

New 05-21-17

LAWSON, Chester G, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class

LAWSON, Chester G, TM2, 6162724, USNR, from Texas, USS Seawolf, location Netherlands East Indies, missing, date of loss October 3, 1944 (pm)

LAWSON, Chester G, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6162724, USN, from Texas, Oct-45, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LAWSON, Chester Gelean, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Margie Evangaline Lawson, 329 Bissell Ave., Richmond, Calif (na)

LAWLER, William J, TM2, 3757094, USN, from California, USS Ingraham, location Nova Scotia, missing, date of loss August 22, 1942 (pm)

New 05-21-17

LEECY, Raymond A, Chief Torpedoman's Mate

LEECY, Raymond A, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3165257, USN, from Nebraska, November 1945 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LEECY, Raymond, CTM, USN, Shark SS-314, probably October 24, 1944 (nm)
LEECY, Raymond Arthur, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Lois Marie Leecy, 1740 Casitas Ave., Pasadena, Calif (na)

LEECY, Raymond A, CTMA, 3165257, USN, from Nebraska, USS Shark (SS-314), location China Seas, missing, date of loss October 24, 1944 (pm)

New 05-21-17

LEEPER, Charles Alvie, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LEEPER, Charles A, TM3, 6800237, USS Borie (DD-704), 3rd Fleet Operations against Japan, August 9, 1945, (CasCode121) killed in combat, dd August 9, 1945 (bp5)

LEEPER, Charles A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6800237, USN, from California, Aug-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LEEPER, Charles Alvie, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ira Otis Leeper, Rt. 2, Box 27, Brawley, Calif (na)

New 05-21-17

LEMPER, Clarence Lister, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

LEMPER, Clarence L, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 4082895, USN, from Iowa, Jul-45, East Coast Memorial (bm)

LEMPER, Clarence, CTM, USN, Dorado SS-248, probably October 12, 1943 (nm)

LEMPER, Clarence Lister, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Agatha Louise Lemper, 67 Blackhall, New London, Conn (na)

LEMPER, Clarence L, CTMP, 4082895, USN, from Iowa, USS Dorado, location Panama, missing, date of loss October 13, 1943 (pm)

New 05-21-17

LESCHINSKI, Thaddeus John, Torpedoman’s Mate

LESCHINSKI, T J, TM1, 4028675, USNR, from Connecticut, USS Spence, location Philippine Sea, missing, date of loss December 18, 1944 (pm)

LESCHINSKI, Thaddeus J, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 4028675, USN, from Connecticut, Dec-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LESCHINSKI, Thaddeus, TM1c, USN, Hull DD-350, Spence DD-512 or Monaghan DD-354, December 18, 1944 (nm)

LESCHINSKI, Thaddeus John, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Andrew Leschinski, 123 Harbison Ave., Hartford, Conn (na)

LESCHINSKI, Thaddeus J, TM1, 4028675, USS Spence (DD-512), 3rd Fleet off Samar, Typhoon, December 18, 1944, (pm/dd/3)

New 05-21-17

LEWELLEN, Roy Lee, torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LEWELLEN, Roy L, TM3, 3511018, USN, from Oklahoma, USS Monaghan, location Philippine Sea, missing, date of loss December 18, 1944 (pm)

LEWELLEN, Roy L, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3511018, USN, from Oklahoma, Dec-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LEWELLEN, Roy, TM3c, USN, Hull DD-350, Spence DD-512 or Monaghan DD-354, December 18, 1944 (nm)

LEWELLEN, Roy Lee, torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Nancy Ann Lewellen, 907 S. 3d, Enid, Okla (na)

LEWELLEN, Roy L, TM3, 3511018, USS Monaghan (DD-354), 3rd Fleet off Samar, Typhoon, December 18, 1944, (pm/dd/3)

New 05-21-17

LEWIS, Warren Edwin, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LEWIS, Warren E, TM3, 5640306, USNR, from California, USS Herring, location China, missing, date of loss July 5, 1944 (pm)

LEWIS, Warren E, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 5640306, USN, from California, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LEWIS, Warren, TM3c, USN, Herring SS-233, June 1, 1944 (nm)

LEWIS, Warren Edwin, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Gertrude Harris Lewis, 1298 Redondo Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif (na)

New 05-21-17

LEYSON, Simeon, Torpedoman's Mate First Class

LEYSON, Simeon, TM1, 1813100, Manila Bay area, Philippine Islands Campaign, (POWCasCode8321) died as POW July 28, 1942, dd July 28, 1942 (bp6)

LEYSON, Simeon, TM1, 1813100, USNR, from Philippines, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss July 28, 1942 (pm)

LEYSON, Simeon, Torpedoman's Mate 1c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Matalia D. Leyson, 572 B. Guadalupe, Nakati. Rizal, PI (na)

LEYSON, Simeon, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 1813100, USN, from Philippines, Jul-42, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

New 05-21-17

LIBBY, Raymond Nelson, Torpedoman 1c

LIBBY, Raymond Nelson, Torpedoman 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Loren N. Libby, 4 Lavin Ct., Sanford, Maine (na)

LIBBY, Raymond, TM1c, USN, Brownson DD-518, December 26, 1943 (nm)

New 05-21-17

LAWLER, William Jennings, Torpedoman 2c

LAWLER, William J, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3757094, USN, from California, Aug-43, East Coast Memorial (bm)

LAWLER, William, TM2c, USN, Ingraham DD-444, August 22, 1942 (nm)

LAWLER, William Jennings, Torpedoman 2c, USN. Father, Mr. James Sanford Lawler, River Route, Box 40, Madera, Calif (na)

LAWLER, William J, TM2, 3757094, USN, from California, USS Ingraham, location Nova Scotia, missing, date of loss August 22, 1942 (pm)

New 05-21-17

LAWSON, Chester Gelean, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

LAWSON, Chester G, TM2, 6162724, USNR, from Texas, USS Seawolf, location Netherlands East Indies, missing, date of loss October 3, 1944 (pm)

LAWSON, Chester G, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6162724, USN, from Texas, Oct-45, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LAWSON, Chester Gelean, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Margie Evangaline Lawson, 329 Bissell Ave., Richmond, Calif (na)

New 05-21-17

LEDERER, Victor Paul, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LEDERER, Victor P, TM3, 7106787, USS Twiggs (DD-591), Okinawa Assault and Occupation, April 28, 1945, (Cascode121) killed in combat, dd April 28, 1945 (bp4)

LEDERER, Victor Paul, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Father, Mr. Henry Lederer, 166 Myrtle Ave., Jersey City, NJ (na)

New 05-21-17

LEEPER, Charles Alvie, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LEEPER, Charles A, TM3, 6800237, USS Borie (DD-704), 3rd Fleet Operations against Japan, August 9, 1945, (CasCode121) killed in combat, dd August 9, 1945 (bp5)

LEEPER, Charles A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6800237, USN, from California, Aug-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LEEPER, Charles Alvie, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ira Otis Leeper, Rt. 2, Box 27, Brawley, Calif (na)

New 05-21-17

LEMPER, Clarence Lister, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

LEMPER, Clarence L, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 4082895, USN, from Iowa, Jul-45, East Coast Memorial (bm)

LEMPER, Clarence, CTM, USN, Dorado SS-248, probably October 12, 1943 (nm)

LEMPER, Clarence Lister, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Agatha Louise Lemper, 67 Blackhall, New London, Conn (na)

LEMPER, Clarence L, CTMP, 4082895, USN, from Iowa, USS Dorado, location Panama, missing, date of loss October 13, 1943 (pm)

New 05-21-17

LESCHINSKI, Thaddeus John, Torpedoman’s Mate

LESCHINSKI, T J, TM1, 4028675, USNR, from Connecticut, USS Spence, location Philippine Sea, missing, date of loss December 18, 1944 (pm)

LESCHINSKI, Thaddeus J, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 4028675, USN, from Connecticut, Dec-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LESCHINSKI, Thaddeus, TM1c, USN, Hull DD-350, Spence DD-512 or Monaghan DD-354, December 18, 1944 (nm)

LESCHINSKI, Thaddeus John, Torpedoman’s Mate, 1c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Andrew Leschinski, 123 Harbison Ave., Hartford, Conn (na)

LESCHINSKI, Thaddeus J, TM1, 4028675, USS Spence (DD-512), 3rd Fleet off Samar, Typhoon, December 18, 1944, (pm/dd/3)

New 05-21-17

LEWELLEN, Roy Lee, torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LEWELLEN, Roy L, TM3, 3511018, USN, from Oklahoma, USS Monaghan, location Philippine Sea, missing, date of loss December 18, 1944 (pm)

LEWELLEN, Roy L, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3511018, USN, from Oklahoma, Dec-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LEWELLEN, Roy, TM3c, USN, Hull DD-350, Spence DD-512 or Monaghan DD-354, December 18, 1944 (nm)

LEWELLEN, Roy Lee, torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Nancy Ann Lewellen, 907 S. 3d, Enid, Okla (na)

LEWELLEN, Roy L, TM3, 3511018, USS Monaghan (DD-354), 3rd Fleet off Samar, Typhoon, December 18, 1944, (pm/dd/3)

New 05-21-17

LEWIS, Warren Edwin, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LEWIS, Warren E, TM3, 5640306, USNR, from California, USS Herring, location China, missing, date of loss July 5, 1944 (pm)

LEWIS, Warren E, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 5640306, USN, from California, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LEWIS, Warren, TM3c, USN, Herring SS-233, June 1, 1944 (nm)

LEWIS, Warren Edwin, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Gertrude Harris Lewis, 1298 Redondo Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif (na)

New 05-21-17

LEYSON, Simeon, Torpedoman's Mate First Class

LEYSON, Simeon, TM1, 1813100, Manila Bay area, Philippine Islands Campaign, (POWCasCode8321) died as POW July 28, 1942, dd July 28, 1942 (bp6)

LEYSON, Simeon, TM1, 1813100, USNR, from Philippines, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss July 28, 1942 (pm)

LEYSON, Simeon, Torpedoman's Mate 1c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Matalia D. Leyson, 572 B. Guadalupe, Nakati. Rizal, PI (na)

LEYSON, Simeon, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 1813100, USN, from Philippines, Jul-42, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

New 05-21-17

LIBBY, Raymond Nelson, Torpedoman 1c

LIBBY, Raymond Nelson, Torpedoman 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Loren N. Libby, 4 Lavin Ct., Sanford, Maine (na)

LIBBY, Raymond, TM1c, USN, Brownson DD-518, December 26, 1943 (nm)

New 05-21-17

LIGGETT, Guy William, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LIGGETT, Guy W, TM3, 2800110, USN, from Ohio, USS Dorado, location Panama, missing, date of loss October 13, 1943 (pm)

LIGGETT, Guy W, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2800110, USN, from Ohio, Jul-45, East Coast Memorial (bm)

LIGGETT, Guy, TM3c, USN, Dorado SS-248, probably October 12, 1943 (nm)

LIGGETT, Guy William, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Dorothy Liggett, 288 Osborn St., Fall River, Mass (na)

New 05-21-17

LIGHT, James Dawson, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate

LIGHT, James D, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, 3820056, USN, from California, Sep-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LIGHT, James Dawson, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Mother, Mrs. May Ferguson, 533 Palm Ave., Bellflower, Calif (Died as POW) (na)

LIGHT, James D, CTMA, 3820056, USN, from California, Shinyo Maru (POW ship), location Philippine Sea, missing, date of loss September 7, 1944 (pm)

LIGHT, James D, CTMA, 3820056, Manila Bay area, Philippine Islands Campaign, (POWCasCode8337), died September 7, 1944, dd September 7, 1944 (bp6)

New 05-21-17

LINDEMAN, Boyd Odell, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

LINDEMAN, Boyd O, TM1, 6241777, USNR, from Texas, USS Flier, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss August 13, 1944 (pm)

LINDEMAN, Boyd O, TM1, USN, Flier SS-250, August 13, 1944 (nm)

LINDEMAN, Boyd O, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 6241777, USN, from Texas, 1946 (WW2), Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LINDEMAN, Boyd Odell, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Eva Mildred Lindeman, 604 E. 4th St., Alice, Tex (na)

New 05-21-17

LITERAL, John Thomas, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LITERAL, John T, TM3, 6533444, USS Turner (DD-648), off New York, explosion, January 3, 1944, dd January 4, 1948 (bp6)

LITERAL, John T, TM3, 6553444, USNR, from Oregon, USS Turner, location Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss January 3, 1944 (pm)

LITERAL, John T, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6553444, USN, from Oregon, Jan-44, East Coast Memorial (bm)

LITERAL, John, TM3c, USN, Turner DD-648, January 3, 1944 (nm)

LITERAL, John Thomas, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Father, Mr. Thomas Literal, Rt. 4, Hillsboro, Ore (na)

New 05-21-17

LLOYD, Robert Dale, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

LLOYD, Robert D, TM2, 3561028, USN, from Oklahoma, USS Corvina, location Marshall Islands, missing, date of loss November 16, 1943 (pm)

LLOYD, Robert D, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 3561028, USN, from Oklahoma, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LLOYD, Robert, TM2c, USN, Covina SS-226, November 16, 1943 (nm)

LLOYD, Robert Dale, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Step-mother, Mrs. Alice A. Lloyd, 327 E. Zion St., Tulsa, Okla (na)

New 05-21-17

LOBECK, Henry Peter, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LOBECK, Henry P, TM3, 6689990, USNR, from Missouri, USS R-12, location Atlantic Ocean: North American Waters, missing, date of loss June 12, 1943 (pm)

LOBECK, Henry Peter, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6689990, USN, from Missouri, Jul-43, East Coast Memorial (bm)

LOBECK, Henry, TM3, USN, R-12 SS-89, June 12, 1943 (nm)

LOBECK, Henry Peter, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gustave Lobeck, 451 George St., Kirkwood, Mo (na)

New 05-21-17

LOCKYER, Douglas Henry Norman, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LOCKYER, Douglas H N, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 3816020, USN, from California, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LOCKYER, Douglas, TM3c, USN, Grayback SS-208, February 27, 1944 (nm)

LOCKYER, Douglas Henry Norman, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. H. N. Lockyer, 1026 Niles St., Bakersfield, Calif (na)

LOCKYER, Douglas H, TM3, 3816020, USN, from California, USS Grayback, location China Seas, missing, date of loss March 28, 1944 (pm)

New 05-21-17

LONG, Percy Eugene, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

LONG, Percy E, TM2, 2744374, USN, from Mississippi, USS Triton, location Admiralty Islands, missing, date of loss April 8, 1943 (pm)

LONG, Percy E, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 2744374, USN, from Mississippi, Apr-44, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LONG, Percy, TM2c, USN, Triton SS-201, probably March 15, 1943 (nm)

LONG, Percy Eugene, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Bessie Long, Box 185, Belzoni, Miss (na)

New 05-21-17

LORING, Brent Kirkland, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 1c

LORING, Brent K Jr, TMV1, 6333923, USNR, from California, USS Bismarck Sea, location Bonin & Volcano Islands, missing, date of loss February 21, 1945 (pm)

LORING, Brent K, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 6333923, USN, from California, Feb-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LORING, Brent, TM1c, USN, Bismarck Sea CVE-95, February 21, 1945 (nm)

LORING, Brent Kirkland, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Elda Marie Loring, 3214 Mayfield Ave., La Crescenta, Calif (na)

LORING, Brent K, Jr, TMV1, 6333923, USS Bismarck Sea (CVE-95), Iwo Jima Landing and Occupation, February 21, 1945, (CasCode6421), dd February 21, 1945 (bp4)

New 05-21-17

LOUGHLIN, Thomas Philip, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

LOUGHLIN, Thomas P, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 2071049, USN, from Connecticut, Feb-43, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LOUGHLIN, Thomas, TM2c, USN, Shark SS-174, February 7, 1942 (nm)

LOUGHLIN, Thomas Philip, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Father, Mr. William J. Loughlin, 11 Cromwell St., Hartford, Conn (na)

LOUGHMAN, William C, SEA2, 6062459, USS Quincy, Savo Island, August 9, 1942, (CasCode 6221) missing, later declared dead, dd August 10, 1943 (bp1)

New 05-21-17

LOUQUET, Eugene, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

LOUQUET, Eugene, TM3, 2250220, USN, from New Jersey, USS Drexler, location Japan, missing, date of loss May 28, 1945 (pm)

LOUQUET, Eugene, TM3c, USN, Drexler DD-741, May 28, 1945 (nm)

LOUQUET, Eugene, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2250220, USN, from New Jersey, May-45, Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LOUQUET, Eugene, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leon Louquet, 47 1st St., Freehold, NJ (na)

LOUQUET, Eugene, TM3, 2250220, USS Drexler (DD-741), Okinawa Assault and Occupation, May 28, 1945, (CasCode6421), dd May 28, 1945 (bp4)

New 05-21-17
 

LOWMAN, Cecil, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

LOWMAN, Cecil, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6143665, USN, from Ohio, May-44, East Coast Memorial (bm)

LOWRY, Raymond Morris, Torpedoman's Mate 1c

LOWRY, Raymond M, TM1, 8659526, USNR, from Missouri, USS Borie (DD-704), location Hawaiian Islands, missing, date of loss August 9, 1945 (pm)

LOWRY, Raymond M, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 8659526, USN, from Missouri, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LOWRY, Raymond Morris, Torpedoman's Mate 1c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Gladys Smith Lowry, 408 E. Florence, Windsor, Mo (Missing in action) (na)

LOWRY, Raymond M, TM1, 8659526, USS Borie (DD-704), 3rd Fleet Operations against Japan, August 9, 1945, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd August 10, 1945 (bp5)

New 05-21-17

LUKOWSKI, Eugene Thomas, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

LUKOWSKI, Eugene Thomas, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Simon S. Lukowski, 2707 Short St., El Monte, Calif (na)

LUND, Paul Odell, Torpedoman's Mate First Class

LUND, Paul O, TM1, 2012474, USN, from Massachusetts, USS Langley, location Java, missing, date of loss February 27, 1942 (pm)

LUND, Paul Odell, Torpedoman's Mate First Class, 2012474, USN, from Massachusetts, March 1, 1942, MIA, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LUND, Paul, TM1c, USN, Langley AV-3, March 1, 1942 (nm)

LUND, Paul Odell, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Sister, Mrs. Anna M. Helle, 398 Oliver Pl., Bronx, New York, NY (na)

LUND, Paul Odell, TM1, 2012474, USS Langley (AV-3), Java Sea, February 27, 1942, (CasCode6221) missing, later dd Declared dead, dd December 15, 1945 (bp4)

New 05-21-17

LUTHER, Russell Joseph, Torpedoman's Mate 3c

LUTHER, Russell J, TM3, 8235335, USS Walke (DD-723), Lingayen Gulf, January 6, 1945, (Cascode121) killed in combat, dd January 6, 1945 (bp4)

LUTHER, Russell J, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 8235335, USN, from Rhode Island, Jan-45, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LUTHER, Russell, TM3c, USN, Walke DD-723, January 6, 1945 (nm)

LUTHER, Russell Joseph, Torpedoman's Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Barbara Luther, 122 Ellery St., Providence, RI (na)

New 05-21-17

LYNCH, Francis Frederick, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LYNCH, Francis F, TM3, 2235155, USN, from New York, USS Sims, location Coral Sea, missing, date of loss May 7, 1942 (pm)

LYNCH, Francis F, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 2235155, USN, from New York, May-43, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LYNCH, Francis, TM3c, USN, Sims DD-409, May 7, 1942 (nm)

LYNCH, Francis Frederick, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Frances Fanella, 2343 Newbold Ave., New York, NY (na)

LYNCH, Francis Frederick, TM3, 2235155, USS Sims (DD-409), Coral Sea, May 7, 1942, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd May 8, 1943 (bp4)

New 05-21-17

LYNCH, Joseph Francis, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c

LYNCH, Joseph F, TM2, 7071444, USNR, from New Jersey, USS Bonefish, location Sea Of Japan, missing, date of loss July 14, 1945 (pm)

LYNCH, Joseph F, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 7071444, USN, from New Jersey, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LYNCH, Joseph, TM2c, USN, Bonefish SS-223, probably June 18, 1945 (nm)

LYNCH, Joseph Francis, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. James J. Lynch, 1019 Monroe Ave., Elizabeth, NJ (na)

New 05-21-17

LYNN, Harvey Austin, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LYNN, Harvey A Jr, TM3, 5646881, USNR, from California, USS Harder, location Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss August 24, 1944 (pm)

LYNN, Harvey A Jr, TM3, USN, Harder SS-257, August 24, 1944 (nh)

LYNN, Harvey A, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 5646881, USN, from California, Oct-45, Manila American Cemetery (bm)

LYNN, Harvey Austin, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Father, Mr. Harvey Austin Lynn, Sr., 3000 Tyler St., Arlington, Calif (na)

New 05-21-17

LYTLE, Horace Parl, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c

LYTLE, Horace P, TM3, 6575945, USNR, from North Carolina, USS Golet, location Japan, missing, date of loss July 12, 1944 (pm)

LYTLE, Horace Parl, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Potillo Lytle, Old Fort, NC (na)

LYTLE, Horace P, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 6575945, USN, from North Carolina, 1946 (WW2), Honolulu Memorial (bm)

LYTLE, Horace, TM3c, USN, Golet SS-361, probably June 14, 1944 (nm)

New 05-21-17

California WW2 NMCG Casualty List – P Surnames

https://www.accessgenealogy.com/california/california-ww2-nmcg-casualty-list-p-surnames.htm

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

PAYNE, Lewis Roy, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Daughter, Louise Gail Payne, c/o Mrs. Anna Della Payne, P.O. Box 412, Santa Cruz.

PENTLAND, Donald Reeves, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Children, Peggy Eyvonne and Donald Robert Pentland, c/o Mrs. Hazel Cattani, 390 Amalia Ave., Los Angeles.

PETERSEN, Viggo Verne, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Magnus Petersen, Rt. 1, Box 178, Manteca.

PROUTY, Walter Raymond, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Zora Velma Ruth Prouty, 4372 38th St., San Diego.

New 05-20-17

California WW2 NMCG Casualty List – F Surnames

https://www.accessgenealogy.com/california/california-ww2-nmcg-casualty-list-f-surnames.htm

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

FOOTE, George Hollister, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Earl Foote, 7766 D. Maie Ave., Florence Branch, Los Angeles.

FORD, George, Torpedoman 3c, USNR. Father, Mr. George Ford, 112 Concord St., San Francisco.

FINNEY, Don Merle, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Step-mother, Mrs. Maude E. Russ, 2648 Fairmont Ave., San Diego.

FISCHER, William Henry, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Roberta Marie Fischer, 436 W. A St., San Diego.

New 05-20-17

Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery Point Loma, San Diego County, California

Gilbreath, Ivan Wilbur, d. 06/12/1944, TORPEDOMAN 2ND CL US NAVY, Plot: F 71, bur. 06/16/1944, *

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.interment.net/data/us/ca/sandiego/rosecrans/g/rosecrans_g04.htm

Full text of "State summary of war casualties, California"

https://archive.org/stream/statesummaryofwa00unit_15/statesummaryofwa00unit_15_djvu.txt

DEAD

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

BALLINGER, William Franklin, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN.
Wife, Mrs. Winifred Eulalia Ballinger, 1822 S. Muscatel Ave.

BLUM, Carl, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Wife,
Mrs. Renee Lois Blum, 1948 Divisadero St., San Francisco.

CLINE, Cyril Arthur, Torpedoman’s Mate Ic, USN.
Wife, Mrs. Bebe Cline, 1105 Larkin St., San Francisco.

DALTON, Virgle Ray, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR.
Wife. Mrs. Evelyn Fredreka Dalton, 1114 E. 22d St., Oakland.

DRISCOLL, George Crittenden, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN.
Mother, Mrs. Lena Wallace Ryan, 950 Cabrilo St., San Francisco.

FINNEY, Don Merle, Torpedoman’s Mate Ic, USN.
Step-mother, Mrs. Maude E. Russ, 2648 Fairmont Ave., San Diego.

FORD, George, Torpedoman 3c, USNR.
Father, Mr. George Ford, 112 Concord St., San Francisco.

GAYLOR, Welch, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN.
Sister, Mrs. Geneva Braga, 1160 Roscrans St., San Diego.

HARRIS, Robert, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR.
Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Harris, 278 23d Ave, San Francisco.

HICKS, Carl James, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN.
Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hicks, 1968 W. Willard St., Long Beach.

KARNS, Forest Earl, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR.
Mother, Mrs. Ethel Kams, 157 W. Center St, Hynes.

KIBBONS, Clarence Vernon, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. 'Wife,
Mrs. Betty Kibbons, 6102 E. Ocean Ave., Long Beach.

KLEIN, Joseph Leo, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR.
Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Klein, 1446 Guerraro, San Francisco.

LEECY, Raymond Arthur, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN.
Wife, Mrs. Lois Marie Leecy, 1740 Casitas Ave., Pasadena.

MOON, Edward Eldridge, Chief Torpedoman, USN.
Wife, Mrs. Jessie Juanita Moon, 4164 Alpha St., San Pedro.

MURDAUGH, Herbert Edwin, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN.
Father, Mr. Herbert Edwin Murdaugh, Sr., 516 W. 31st St., Los Angeles.

PAYNE, Lewis Roy, Torpedoman’s Mate Ic, USN.
Daughter, Louise Gail Payne, c/o Mrs. Anna Della Payne, P.O. Box 412, Santa Cruz.

PROUTY, Walter Raymond, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN.
Wife, Mrs. Zora Ve^ma Ruth Prouty, 4372 38th St., San Diego.

RALSTON, William James, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR.
Parents, Mr. and Mrs. William James Ralston, Sr., 1357 Perris Hill Rd., San Bernardino.

REED, G. Russell, Torpedoman’s I Mate 2c, USN.
Parents, Mr. and j Mrs. Giles Joseph Reed, 131 Som1 erset St., San Francisco.

RYAN, David William, Torpedoman, USN.
Mother, Mrs. Venus Magdalene Leggett, 26 Evergreen Ave., Mill Valley.

SMITH, Austin, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR.
Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tolbert Smith, Box 64, Anderson.

SUMNERS, Roy Earl, Torpedoman’s Mate Ic, USN.
Wife, Mrs. Elaine Harrett Sumners, Tehachapi.

WADSWORTH, Charles Waite, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR.
Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Wadsworth, 4257 Beeman Ave., North Hollywood.

WEEKLEY, Leland Stanford, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN.
Wife, Mrs. Edith Kleven Weekley, 3005 N. Santa Fe, Compton.

MISSING

RALSTON, William James, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR.
Parents, Mr. and Mrs. William James Ralston, Sr., 1357 Perris Hill Rd., San Bernardino.


WOUNDED

HILL, James Monroe, Torpedoman’s Mate Ic, USNR.
Wife, Mrs. Leta Ray Hill, 8246 Allison St., La Mesa.

HUMPHREY, Vincent Eugene, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN.
Wife, Mrs. Hazel Louis Humphrey, 956 Post St., San Francisco.

MARTIN, Elmer Earl, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN.
Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charle§ Martin, 430 W. Elcamino Ave., North Sacramento.

O’LOUGHLIN, Kenneth Edward, Torpedoman’s Mate Ic. USNR.
Wife, Mrs. Mary E. O’Loughlin, 1416 Q St., Sacramento.

RILEY, David Odell, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR.
Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred L. Riley, 151 W. 138th St., Hawthorne.

SHEPARD, Surtes Garrison, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR.
Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Surtes Garrison Shepard, Sr., 645 Ballantyne Lane, El Cajon.

TELLO, George, Torpedoman’s Mate Ic, USNR.
Mother, Mrs. Augusta Tello, 101 Cleveland St., San Jose.

TOWNSEND, Clark Keptlar, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate Ic, USN.
Wife, Mrs. Florence C. Townsend, 207 S. 2d St., San Jose.

DIED OR KILLED IN PRISONER OF WAR STATUS

MOULTON, J. Earl, Torpedoman’s Mate Ic, USN.
Father, Mr. J. Walter Moulton, Rt. 1, Vista.

VAN BAUGH, Holly, Torpedoman’s Mate Ic, USNR.
Wife, Mrs. Reth Lavern Van Baugh, Rt. 1, Box 707, Fresno.

RELEASED PRISONERS

NETTER, Harold Nicholis, Chief Torpedoman, USN.
Wife, Mr. and Mrs. Clara Etta Netter, 1006 F St., San Diego.

TINSLEY, John Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN.
Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Tinsley, Sr., 309 10th St., Huntington Beach.

New 05-20-17

 

JOHN ALDEN BEIASLEY Torpedoman Second Class

https://archive.org/stream/servicerecordboo00amer/servicerecordboo00amer_djvu.txt

Date of Induction-October 10, 1942.

Branch of Service-Navy.

Training Stations-Great Lakes, Illinois.

Theater of operation-Pacific and Atlantic.

Discharge Station-Great Lakes, Illinois.

Date of Discharge-December 18, 1945.

Medals earned -Philippine Liberation Ribbon W/2 Stars, Asia Hc-Pacific Theater Ribbon W/1 Silver Star, American Theater Ribbon. Good Conduct Medal, Victory Medal and Naval Unit Citation.

Ratlng-Torpedoman Second Class.

Total Months Served-3 years, 2 months and 6 days.

New 05-19-17

On Eternal Patrol - Lost Submariners of World War II

Martin Lewis Herstich, Jr.

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.oneternalpatrol.com/herstich-m-l.htm

Rank/Rate Torpedoman’s Mate, First Class

Service Number 375 89 75

Birth Date August 12, 1916

From San Jose, California

Decorations Purple Heart

Submarine USS Triton (SS-201)

Loss Date March 15, 1943

Location Between Rabaul and Shortlands Basin

Circumstances Probably sunk by depth charge attack

Remarks Martin was born in Sunnyvale, California.

New 05-19-17

HAL H. DUPUY Torpedoman 3rd Class

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.purplehearts.net/id7.html

Torpedoman 3rd Class Hal H. Dupuy served aboard the submarine USS Shark (SS-314). The Shark failed to return from her third war patrol. She was officially listed as missing in action on November 7. 1944.

The Shark 's last contact was made with the USS Seadragon on October 24th, when she stated she had made contact with a single freighter and was preparing to attack.

A short time later the Japanese Hellship Arisan Maru, carrying 1800 American Prisoners of war, was sunk by a torpedo from an American submarine.

No other submarine reported this attack, and it can only be assumed that the Shark made the attack on the Arisan Maru, and perished during or after the attack.

Dupuy was from Duncan, Oklahoma.

New 05-18-17

Torpedoman 2/c Harrell Flowers

Wartime Weddings

Union WAC Marries Laurel Sailor

http://www.carolshouse.com/militaryrecords/weddings/ 

Cpl. Jewell L. James, daughter of Mrs. Etta James, of Union, and Torpedoman 2/c Harrell Flowers, of Laurel, were married Saturday night, October 7, 1944, in Laurel, Miss.

The happy young couple have been spending their honeymoon visiting relatives here and at Laurel. After their leave from the service expires they will return to their respective posts of duty, Mrs. Flowers to Washington, D. C., where she is stationed with the WAC, and Mr. Flowers to San Francisco where he will report to the Navy for duty on a submarine.

He has been in the Navy five years and said his submarine had been credited with 25 Jap ships sunk.

New 05-18-17

Here is list of war dead, mostly Pearl Harbor era

http://www.genealogy.com/forum/general/topics/wwii/13513/

Tow, Paul Herbert, torpedoman, 3d class

HOWARD L. HAMILTON Torpedoman 3rd Class

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://www.purplehearts.net/id7.html

Torpedoman 3rd Class Howard L. Hamilton served aboard the USS Robalo (SS-273). Robalo under Cmdr. M.M. Kimmel, departed Fremantle on June 22, 1944 to conduct her third war patrol in the South China Sea in the vicinity of the Natuna Islands.

After traversing Makassar and Balabac Straits, she was to arrive on station about July 6th and stay there until dark on August 2, 1944. On July 2nd a contact report stated Robalo had sighted a Fuso-class battleship with air cover and two destroyers for escort, just east of Borneo.

No other messages were received from Robalo and when she did not return from patrol, she was reported as presumed lost.

The following information was received via the Philippine guerrillas and an U.S. Navy enlisted man who was a prisoner of war at Puerto Princesa Prison Camp, Palawan, P.I.

On August 2, 1944, a note dropped from the window of the prison cell in which survivors from Robalo were held was picked up by an American soldier in a work detail and given to H.D. Hough, Y2c, USN, another prisoner.

On 4 August, Hough contacted Mrs. Trinidad Mendosa, wife of guerrilla leader Dr. Mendosa, who furnished further information on the survivors.

From these sources, he put together the following facts:

Robalo was sunk July 26, 1944, two miles off the western coast of Palawan Island as a result of an explosion of her after battery.

Four men swam ashore, an officer and three enlisted men: Samuel L. Tucker, Ens.; Floyd G. Laughlin, QM1c; Wallace K. Martin, SM3c, and Mason C. Poston, EM2c. They made their way through the jungles to a small barrio northwest of the Puerto Princesa camp.

They were captured there by Japanese Military Police, and confined in the jail. They were held for guerrilla activities rather than as prisoners of war, it is said.

On August 15, 1944, a Japanese destroyer evacuated them, and nothing further is known of their destination or whereabouts. The Japanese may have executed them or the destroyer may have been sunk.

 At any rate, they were never recovered and their note stated that there were no other survivors.

It is doubtful that a battery explosion could be sufficiently violent to cause the sinking of the ship; more likely Robalo struck an enemy mine.

New 05-18-17

North Carolinians Service Records January 2, 1945-January 17, 1945

http://ncwwii.lostsoulsgenealogy.com/servicerecords/servicerecordsjan2171945.htm

Torpedoman’s Mate 2nd Class James E. Carawan, U.S.N.R., wounded.

Mr. and Mrs. Grover Cleveland Carawan, parents, 712 W. Mala St., Belhaven

WWII Casualties
Nashville History

http://nashvillehistory.blogspot.com/2010/05/

WORLD WAR II, HONOR ROLL  OF DEAD AND MISSING FROM DAVIDSON COUNTY, TENN.

Ballinger, James Walter

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

Torpedoman's Mate 1c

USNR

Wife, Mrs. Ethel May Ballinger

1827 Cephas Ave., Nashville

Dead

New 05-18-17

Mainers, who Gave Their All During WWII

York County

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.russpickett.com/history/meyork.htm

The following list was created in the memory of the brave men and women from York County, Maine that gave their all for their State and Country during World War II. Soldiers, Sailors and Merchant Marines, are all included on this listing.

There are personal "online memorials" for each of these honored men and women that were created for them by using the "Find A Grave" website. You will see a blue " Yes " behind their names and by clicking on the " Yes " you will see their personal memorial that has been created for them. On "many" of the online memorials you will see a small biography for each soldier which includes: parent's names, where they lived and where and how they actually died. If you see one without a bio and you have information on them please email me and I'll update their records.

Libby, Raymond Nelson ~ PH ~ Off Cape Gloucester

Torpedoman First Class

U.S.S. Brownson

Navy

Sanford, Maine

Killed In Action

Dec. 26, 1943

Saint Ignatius Cemetery

Sanford, Maine

New 05-18-17

Recovery, the Beluga submarine, and Voyage to the Deep

Adding to my oceanic inspirations was the fact that my father was a Navy man, a torpedoman’s mate, during the Cold War. Dad served aboard the USS Fulton, the famous submarine tender that supported some of the most historic submarines in Navy history, including the Nautilus, the Skipjack, and the Triton.

http://kosmosflot.blogspot.com/2008/07/recovery-beluga-submarine-and-voyage-to.html

I survived my visit to the surgeon last Friday, and I’m happy to report that I’m feeling better every day, even quasi-human some of the time. My dear wifey and son have been most attentive to my needs during my recovery, and my dear cohorts at work have (so far) left me alone to convalesce, bless them all.

One of the few things I can do while flat on my back is, thank goodness, read. Before I went on medical leave I was able to stock up on some special-request books from the Indiana University library, including the following:

Cry of the Deep: The Submarine Disaster That Riveted the World and Put the New Russia to the Ultimate Test, by Ramsey Flynn – A gripping account of the loss of the submarine Kursk.

Rising Tide: The Untold Story of the Russian Submarines That Fought the Cold War, by Gary E. Weir and Walter J. Boyne.

Hostile Waters, by Captain Peter Huchthausen, USN (ret).; Captain First Rank Igor Kurdin, Russian Navy; and R. Alan White – An account of the loss of the Russian submarine K-219 during the height of the Cold War.

Cold War Submarines: The Design and Construction of U.S. and Soviet Submarines, by Norman Polmar and Kenneth J. Moore.

As you can tell, I was in an undersea mood having just read William H. Keith’s submarine warfare-in-the-future novel Sharuq. And even thought I’m an Air Force veteran, I’ve always been interested in ships and submarines. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne was probably the first true science fiction book that I ever laid eyes on as a boy, and Captain Nemo was certainly my first and still favorite anti-hero.

Adding to my oceanic inspirations was the fact that my father was a Navy man, a torpedoman’s mate, during the Cold War. Dad served aboard the USS Fulton, the famous submarine tender that supported some of the most historic submarines in Navy history, including the Nautilus, the Skipjack, and the Triton. I spent many an hour browsing through my dad’s Bluejacket manual, gazing at photos of those amazing subs. And now my six-year-old son is doing the same, looking through the great pictures in the Cold War Submarines volume, even sketching some drawings for his laid-up dad.

I almost dropped the hefty Cold War Submarines book when I came upon the photo and schematic of the Soviet’s Project 1710 – NATO Code name Beluga submarine. Commissioned in 1987 as a research platform for streamline hull design, the Beluga is the spitting image of a fictional submarine called the Proteus, from Dell Comic’s early 1960’s four-issue mini-series Voyage to the Deep. Drawn by one of my favorite “silver age” comic artists, Sam Glanzman, this submarine/SF series was undoubtedly an unofficial inspiration from Irwin Allen’s Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea motion picture that later became a television series on the ABC network. Glanzman also drew another of my favorite early-1960s Dell comics, Kona: Monarch of Monster Isle, a great Lost World/SF series filled with dinosaurs and other overgrown beasties.

In the Voyage to the Deep series, the Proteus was the first American submarine able to dynamically “change its mass” via some amazing new technology. Glanzman showed the sub actually changing its length and weight at critical times during its voyages. There were vague references to “The Enemy”, i.e. the Soviets, and the plots were very much like those that would later be seen on Irwin Allen’s Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea TV series.

But you have to give Sam Glanzman some credit. He depicted the ultra-modern submarine’s design in perfect form … 25 years before it was actually built! Unfortunately for the Soviet Navy, they were not able to dynamically alter the Beluga sub’s mass during its voyages!

Best wishes,

Viktor Kuprin

New 05-18-17

Calhoun Chronicle's Salute To Veterans

Cecil Sturm - Chief Torpedoman, Navy

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.calhounchronicle.com/Pages/Current Pages/Archives/Miscellaneous/Posted/Salute To Veterans 2010.htm 

NAVY

Cecil Sturm - Chief Torpedoman, Navy, Pacific Theater, USS Yorktown, USS Wailer, First WWII Purple Heart in Calhoun County.

New 05-17-17

In Memoriam
Men from Wabash County, Indiana
Who Died in WW II

http://www.ingenweb.org/inwabash/wwii-mem.html 

Transcribed by Ron Woodward from book entitled In Memoriam, prepared by the Thomas Stineman Post No. 15 of the American Legion, Mrs. Jeanne Grover, Forrest G. Baer and W.W. Wimberly. 52 pages, no date of publication given. Text mixed with photographs. If anyone reading the list would like a scan of a photograph I would be glad to provide one for them. Email: drwoodward@cinergymetro.net

 MAX M. ROGERS 20, torpedoman third class in the U.S. Navy

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

MAX M. ROGERS 20, torpedoman third class in the U.S. Navy, was lost in
action while on combat duty at sea in the south Pacific aboard the submarine Harder.

Loss of the ship during October with her entire crew was not revealed until January. Torpeodoman Rogers made his home with his grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Justus Rogers, Wabash Rural Route 4.

He was graduated from lagro High School in l942 and enlisted in the navy the following October. Other survivors include his mother, Mrs. S.J. White,
Ijamsville.

New 05-17-17

Chief Torpedoman's Mate Alfred Norwood

http://pt-king.gdinc.com/Tulagi.html

The Tulagi Scene

October 1942-February 1943

July 1942-April 1943

PT Boats

February 17, 1943: Five men of Squadron Three recieve awards for valor for actions during October-November 1942. (L-r): Chief Torpedoman's Mate Alfred Norwood, PT 61; Ship's Cook 1/c Carl Todd, PT 48; Gunner's Mate 1/c Benjamin Parrish, PT 61; Quartermaster's Mate 1/c Lee Bagby, PT 39; and Chief Quartermaster's Mate John Legg, PT 37. (PT Boats, Inc.)

The establishment of a base for the care and feeding of motor torpedo boats at Tulagi began in late September 1942, when Lt. j/g Robert C. Wark arrived on Guadalcanal and reported to Maj. Gen. Alexander A. Vandergrift, commander of the First Marine Division. Lieutenant Wark was from the first section of Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron Three, which was at that moment at Noumea, New Caledonia preparing for transportation to the area. Lieutenant Wark's task was to make the necessary arrangements for the establishment of the new PT base.

After meeting with the Marine commander, Lieutenant Wark later proceeded to Tulagi to call upon Vandergrift's deputy, Brig. Gen. William Rupertus. Accompanying the lieutenant was Comdr. James P. Compton, Commander, Naval Activities, Guadalcanal. Tulagi, the Marine general and the two naval officers sailed to Gavutu to determine its desirability for Squadron Three’s setting up shop—but a quick preliminary survey promptly decided that it would be quite unsuitable for the squadron's new home.

The battle to secure the island had been particularly savage; the terrain was thoroughly devastated, the island was too vulnerable to shelling from the sea as well as air attack, and provided any prospective base too little cover from enemy air reconnaissance.

One further consideration also eliminated Gavutu from the short list of suitable sites—the presence of numerous, partially exposed and rotting corpses—the remains of Japanese soldiers who had been killed during the fighting.

Returning to Tulagi, Rupertus, Compton, and Wark examined a cove located at a small village on the northeast side of the island. In the days when Tulagi was the seat of British colonial government in the Solomons, the village, spelled in various documents as Sesape, Sesapi, Sasapi, or Sasappi, was a small but thriving Chinese trading town, and had been the center of what passed as the local “shipbuilding” industry, complete with a dock and a marine railway for hauling vessels out of the water for repair.

After the Marines landed in August 1942 and wiped out the Japanese garrison defending Tulagi, very little remained of what once was a blossoming little community. During the battle for the island’s possession, the dock was completely destroyed, burned down to the waterline; the marine railway was demolished; and the native buildings, which were nothing more than shacks made with poles placed upright and topped with V-shaped thatched roofs (home to all manner of native bugs and other assorted critters) had been heavily damaged by shells. Despite this, Sesape did offer a few advantages.

First, it was isolated from the main harbor area, so the PT’s would not interfere with other harbor activities. Second, the base had good protection from wind and heavy seas; third, there was better anti-aircraft protection than other areas that the three officers surveyed. Finally, nature’s own geographic barriers, in the shape of nearby Florida Island, made bombardment from the sea nearly impossible.

Admiral Turner was informed of the new site, and upon his approval, development of the new base began immediately. Improvisation was the word of the day—no construction materials were available, and since Tulagi’s Marine contingent was at bare minimum, the only manpower present to aid in the new base's construction was Lieutenant Wark and 59 men from the 6th Naval Construction Battalion led by Lt. Ben Marcus.

 The Construction Battalion--the famed Seabees--patched up a large shack and turned it into the engineering shop and warehouse, while a smaller shack, containing a teakwood floor made of three-inch planks, was transformed into the squadron office.

Sometime later, the first shipment of Squadron Three’s supplies arrived from Noumea aboard cargo ship USS Fuller. Because no working parties were available, the job of unloading fell to Lieutenant Wark and the three enlisted men who accompanied the shipment. It was originally thought packed aboard Fuller were the most critical bits and pieces that the PT’s required, electrical and engineering spare parts such as replacement engines, armatures, magneto points, gaskets, propellers, carburetors, struts, shafts, and so on.

However, when the gear was unloaded, it was found that the majority were things like salt-water soap, toilet paper, and other GSK (general store-keeping) items—-good for improving creature comforts for the PT crews, but but not so good at keeping their boats afloat and running. The lion’s share of engineering and electrical spare parts—important components critically needed in the weeks to come—were still loaded aboard other cargo ships or in crates on the dock back in Noumea.

The rest of Squadron Three's first division arrived in the early morning hours of October 12, 1942. That day and the next saw the squadron hard at work setting up the new base, concluding the work Lieutenant Wark started in making the place presentable.

The base force had the floors of the native shacks, which housed the warehouse, radio hut, engineering shop, and squadron office, reinforced with wood planks and logs. Despite their work, the base remained somewhat austere—at the time there was no drydock, no torpedo compressor, and too few spare parts for the boats.

The arrival of the PT tender Jamestown on October 23rd was a partial relief, but her facilities were too limited to sustain any sort of long-term operations. It was plainly obvious that to take care of the additional squadrons and base personnel expected to arrive from the United States, it was important that Tulagi’s shore facilities be improved and expanded.

Supervised by Lt. Jack Searles and Chief Boatswain's Mate Charles Tufts, the Seabees of the 6th Battalion--now increased to 133 officers and men--dredged and blasted an emergency outlet channel for the harbor, to avoid having PT boats bottled up by enemy warships.

Two PT boat floating drydocks were assembled from pontoons; a 50-man camp was set up; and power and telephone systems to serve the island and harbor area were installed. The detachment also furnished a number of carpenter details to assist with motor torpedo boat maintenance and repair.

Another item that was urgently needed by the PT force was the radio shack. The ships moored along the bank of the Maliali River nullified the signals from Jamestown's radio; in addition, the high hills behind the PT base blocked direct radio transmission between the tender and boats on patrol. Marine headquarters on Tulagi relayed a resume of the day's intelligence from coastwatchers and air scouts, but could not maintain constant communication with boats at sea.

 A temporary solution was to use the radio set up by the naval personnel stationed at Government Wharf. With the arrival of more equipment (mostly obtained by barter or "midnight requisitioning") the torpedo boat men were able to set up their own radio shack at Sesape, powered by a former Japanese diesel generator.

The limited supply of 100-octane fuel was another major problem; the precious liquid, in that area more valuable than gold, was divided between the Tulagi PT's and the airmen on Henderson Field. This often necessitated transferring drum gasoline from Tulagi to Guadalcanal. Once the Jamestown's supply of fuel was exhausted, the boats refueled from 55-gallon drums or from the rubber buoys at NAS Tanambogo. When USS Portland was damaged during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal and laid up for some weeks at Tulagi, the ship generously donated to the PT boats the fuel from her now-useless scout planes as her crew worked to make the damaged cruiser seaworthy.

After the arrival of MTB Squadron Two in December, base facilities expanded even more. The PT organization remained fairly small, but the illness and subsequent evacuation of original Ron Three CO Lieutenant Commander Alan Montgomery in November had left Hugh Robinson, (CO Ron Three) and later, Rollin Westholm (CO Ron Two)—who were both Regular Navy lieutenants—as the senior ranking officers. To exercise some administrative control over the PT's in the area as well the additional squadrons that were soon to come, senior Navy officers felt the Tulagi PT’s needed some sort of overall MTB type command, led by a higher-ranking officer. On December 15, 1942, Comdr. Allen P. Calvert, formerly commander of destroyer USS Craven, arrived at Tulagi to establish Motor Torpedo Boat Flotilla One.

In Commander Calvert's honor, the PT base was named after him; over a main street covered with the pierced steel planking called Marston matting, a rude sign was erected that proclaimed in bold letters.....

 

New 05-17-17

Mid-Atlantic Brawl

Chief Torpedoman Frank G. Cronin

http://www.historynet.com/mid-atlantic-brawl.htm

BY DAVID SEARS

4/6/2017 • MHQ MAGAZINE

Halloween 1943: A no-holds-barred fight breaks out between crews of USS Borie (DD-215) and U-405, with weapons from torpedoes to tommy guns.

For most of the World War II Battle for the North Atlantic, sailors on outmoded U.S. Navy destroyers endured numbing boredom and frustration. But on Halloween 1943 the skipper and crew of USS Borie (DD-215) fought one of the most audacious and desperate sea battles ever.

By spring 1943 the tide in the Battle for the Atlantic, running so long in Germany’s favor, was finally turning. The toll on merchant shipping was still frightful, but the beleaguered Allies were at last able to deploy transformative new resources, tools, and tactics. With the invasion of Europe postponed, shipbuilding shifted from landing craft to indispensable destroyer escorts.

Moreover, American and British hunter-killer groups centered on small “jeep” aircraft carriers were finally ready for duty. And, perhaps most significant for Allied strategy, U.S. Navy Commander in Chief Admiral Ernest J. King had cu

t through interservice clutter and lassitude to establish the Tenth Fleet. Although essentially a paper organization, the Tenth and its commander (nominally King himself but actually his assistant chief of staff, Rear Admiral Francis S. “Frog” Low) would have authority to order any U.S. forces in the Atlantic to take whatever immediate action deemed necessary to counter U-boat threats.

Simultaneously—Allied assessments to the contrary—the Germans were nearing a “crisis of crises.” Stepped-up American antisubmarine warfare in Eastern, Gulf, and Caribbean waters had already compelled German admiral Karl Dönitz to shift Type VII U-boats from the Americas to the open Atlantic.

The medium-size Type VIIs, despite limited endurance and encroaching obsolescence, were the mainstay of Dönitz’s submarine feet and their crews its most experienced. If these boats could somehow shut down North Atlantic shipping, Britain might yet be starved out, denying the Allies a launching pad for the invasion of occupied France.

But things just got worse for the Germans. Accidents, delays, and losses (about a dozen U-boats in March 1943, for example) slowed the growth of the Atlantic submarine force, and with the Allies’ ever more sophisticated and effective countermeasures in resources, tactics, and technology (not just radar, but also “huff duff”—high-frequency direction finding—and decryption of German “Enigma” codes), the German Navy was actually facing disaster.

These big-picture circumstances changed the fortunes of even the smallest players—including aging destroyers like USS Borie (DD-215). Commissioned in 1920, Borie had served in America’s Atlantic, Asiatic, and Pacific Fleets before joining the Western Atlantic Neutrality Patrol, President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s prewar effort to monitor the Western Hemispheric movements of Europe’s belligerent powers.

Serving initially on Inshore Patrol in Panama Bay, Borie eventually shifted to patrol and convoy escort in the Caribbean.

The work was tedious and unrewarding. Lacking radar to foil surface attacks, Borie and its crew were at a disadvantage and seldom got close to the action. In August 1942, however, Borie got a new lease on life—an extensive refit to equip it for oceangoing escort work.

 Borie’s distinctive “four-piper” stacks were trimmed and two of four triple torpedo mounts removed—replaced by six side-firing “K” guns (depth charge projectors) and two single-mount cannons. Most portholes were plated over and the bridge enclosed to afford splinter protection. Even the vestigial crow’s nest on Borie’s main mast gave way to the installation of the antenna for new surface-search radar.

That December Borie also received a new second in command: 30-year-old Lieutenant Charles H. Hutchins—“Hutch” to his friends. Born in Rhode Island, Hutchins had graduated from the Naval Academy in 1936 only to resign his commission two years later, move to Indiana, and begin a career in manufacturing. He rejoined as a Reserve lieutenant (junior grade) when war began, serving a year ashore before assignment to Borie. Sixth months later, on June 6, 1943, Hutchins “fleeted up” to take command of the ship.

Within the month, the young skipper got his first test at sea. On June 17, 1943, while of a convoy, lookouts reported an Borie patrolled the flanks object just 300 yards ahead. After four separate depth charge attacks, the lookouts spotted water boiling up to the surface. Was it evidence of an imploding sub or merely a “water slug”—a compressed-air blast fired as a deception by Borie’s savvy quarry? A final attack produced a slender but indeterminate oil slick. Leaving an army bomber overhead, Borie returned empty-handed to the convoy.

That disappointment was left in the shadows when, after a July period of upkeep and training in New York, Borie joined a task group commanded by Captain Arnold J. “Buster” Isbell aboard escort carrier USS Card (CVE-11). The Card group escorted convoys, but it also could be dispatched by Tenth Fleet for free-ranging hunter-killer missions. However, as Borie’s crew soon learned, their role was primarily defensive. Submarine hunting and killing had become an airborne business.

On the morning of August 7, a team of Card TBF Avengers and F4F Wildcats sank one of two surfaced U-boats only to have the Germans strike back later that day. U-664, skippered by 27-year-old Adolf Graef, a veteran of five patrols with three merchant sinkings, used his boat’s quad and twin 20mm guns to splash an Avenger and a Wildcat.

The next night U-664 even slipped through Card’s destroyer screen (Borie and sister ships Barry [DD-248] and Goff [DD-247]) to fire three torpedoes at the vulnerable carrier. All three missed, sparing Card—and enabling its aviators to exact revenge.

At noon on August 9 an Avenger-Wildcat team surprised U-664, which had surfaced to recharge batteries. Bomb and depth charge explosions caught U-664 at periscope depth and blew it back to the surface. The boat again tried to dive but popped right back up, and its crew jumped ship. Seven hours later Borie’s crew rescued 44 U-664 survivors, including Graef, in their first face-to-face encounter with the enemy.

The Card group’s next chance came in October when Tenth Fleet, acting on timely Enigma decrypts, deployed hunter-killer resources to foil Siegfried, a group of U-boats newly formed to attack mid-Atlantic eastbound convoys. While cargo-laden ships were detoured south of Siegfried, Outbound North 207 (an Allied convoy composed of empty westbound vessels) became “bait.” Escort destroyers ringed ON 207, British escort carrier HMS Biter (D97) cruised in its very center, and British Escort Group B-2, with Tracker (D24) as its nucleus, patrolled nearby.

Soon, two U.S. carrier groups, one centered on Block Island (CVE-21), the other on Card, joined the “great congregation” in the North Atlantic, ostensibly to hunt down Siegfried’s three provisioning U-boats—known as milchkühe, “milk cows.”

Late in the afternoon of October 31, the Card task group hit pay dirt: Avenger pilots sank one of two surfaced U-boats. Concerned that night was falling (and irked that the escaped U-boat might be a milk cow), Captain Isbell sent Borie due east in pursuit. Fighting choppy seas, Borie reached the scene about 2000 hours and shortly thereafter sonar operator Earl J. Potter got a contact, at a range of 6,500 yards.

Closing to a mile, Hutchins swung the ship to starboard to unmask main battery guns. After Borie’s star shells lit up the scene, the sub dived. Radar contact was lost, but sound operator Bob Manning soon established sound contact.

Slowing to close in as the sub crawled northwest at four knots, Borie rolled depth charges and dropped a light marker. The underwater explosion that followed was enough to blow ship fuses and dislodge boiler brickwork. Ten minutes later, with power and sound contact restored and Borie nearing the telltale light marker, crewmen reported “the heavy odor of diesel fuel.”

Borie attacked again—and again withdrew. In the run-up to a third pass, there was a sighting: a sub surfacing—bow high, silhouetted by the marker light—then sliding down stern first. After further search produced no radar, sound, or visual contact, just a long water slick “profusely covered with diesel,” Hutchins was convinced he’d bagged a sub. His dispatch to Card, logged just after midnight on November 1: “Scratch one pig boat
. Am searching for more.”

(Hutchins was wrong. Although severely damaged, U-256 survived. Convinced of their success and collectively stoked with adrenaline, Borie’s crewmen were primed for the even bigger fight to follow.)

Within hours, Bob Manning, stationed now on surface radar, called out another contact, distance 8,000 yards, bearing 170 degrees. Hutchins ordered a turn left and then, with all boilers lit, “Flank speed!” Losing surface contact at 2,800 yards, Hutchins slowed Borie to 15 knots, enabling sound operator Lerten V. Kent to pick up a solid “ping,” 2,000 yards dead ahead.

At 500 yards the contact suddenly slewed right and Borie followed. Five seconds later, answering the order for a deep pattern, Chief Torpedoman Frank G. Cronin released what was supposed to be a few charges. Instead, owing to a malfunction, two entire racks of the “ashcan” charges rolled and erupted with enough force to lift Borie’s stern and shove it forward. Moments later, as if on cue, a sub conning tower broke the surface. “There it is!” cried Bob Maher, Borie’s lead fire controlman, “about 40 feet to the right of the fare.”

 Hutchins ordered the ship’s big searchlight switched on; its beam swung to the port quarter and flooded the target. It was U-405, a Type VIIC sub—though all the Borie crewmen could identify at the time was a milky-gray conning tower emblazoned with the image of a large polar bear.

Borie needed sea room to maneuver and to fight. Out-matched in speed, size, and surface firepower, U-405 had the advantage of a tighter turning radius—which its skipper, 37-year-old Rolf-Heinrich Hopmann, used to good effect. Hutchins ordered Borie to 25 knots. U-405 dropped astern, a gap that opened to 1,400 yards before Borie could turn and close. Meanwhile, though, Borie’s main and secondary batteries opened up. Gun teams on the bigger 4-inchers could fire 33-pound explosive projectiles at a rate of six to eight per minute. The 20mm machine guns (cannons really) could spit 450 canister-fed rounds per minute.

U-405 responded with its own 20mm guns. But just a few rounds struck Borie before its overwhelming return fire cut down Germans on deck sprinting for weapons. Then, once Borie gained broadside, its 4-inchers switched from local to central control. Fire controlman Jim Allegri aimed the three guns that could bear to port. Ten, responding to a “commence firing” order from gunnery officer William Dietz, Bob Maher pressed the firing key and three converging projectiles whooshed in salvo. The second or third of these salvos rocked U-405’s forecastle and, when smoke cleared, its big deck gun—yet to fire—was entirely gone.

Borie’s guns continued to bear, boom, and hammer. U-405, lit by searchlight and streaking tracers, seemed unable to dive. But the boat could still maneuver, and Hopmann again used U-405’s tighter turning circle in efforts to shake loose, or nail Borie with a stern torpedo shot. Maher, stationed atop the flying bridge, witnessed the cat-and-mouse game. Once, when the two vessels appeared about to collide, U-405 put on an evasive burst of speed and Maher got a close look at the Germans as they passed. Some wore sweaters and shorts, others just under wear. Several heads trailed long matted hair while others sported bandanas in green, yellow, and red.

At one point, after the sub finally got of a stern torpedo shot that went wide, Hutchins ordered hard left rudder, hoping to convince the German skipper that Borie would cross astern. It worked—U-405 immediately straightened out. When Hutchins countered with hard right rudder, the two vessels were running parallel, with Borie behind but catching up.

Then, all at once, the sub slowed. A man appeared on its bridge waving his arms. Hutchins commanded, “Cease fire!” But he was too late. In a hail of rounds, the man’s head disappeared—even as his body still stood and his arms still waved. The headless body toppled, U-405 picked up speed, and the deadly chase resumed.

“All right, Aikenhead,” Hutchins told his helmsman, “line her up.” Borie had pulled ahead of U-405, and it was time to move in. Aikenhead spun the wheel to port, aiming the bow to hit the sub’s starboard quarter. “All stations stand by for ram!” Hutchins shouted and phone talkers passed the word across the ship. Men braced for impact: Aikenhead grasped the wheel, Hutchins the screen on the port side pilot house wing; one level up, Dietz and Maher locked arms around the director range finder.

A hard collision was just moments away when U-405 turned hard left as sea swells simultaneously lifted Borie’s bow. Instead of the expected crash, there was a scissoring “soft landing,” which left Borie, engines stopped, riding U-405 bow above bow.

Momentary confusion quickly gave way to frenzy: “Fire! Fire! Open fire!” Hutchins found himself screaming, swinging one arm like a club. Main and secondary batteries had never let up, but now, with targets riding beneath them, it was difficult to aim. The barrels of the 4-inchers could be depressed just 15 degrees; only the aftermost gun could bear—and it could only reach the sub’s main deck aft of the conning tower. Meanwhile, gunners on 20mm cannons three and four—mounted on a raised platform aft amidships—had to fire right through the platform’s weather screen.

Deck guns were not the only weapons at hand; two tommy guns had been retrieved. Hutchins and Borie executive officer Lieutenant Philip Brown fired short bursts to pick of exposed Germans. Unable to find the key to the main deck small-arms locker, Chief Gunner’s Mate Richard Wenz broke through its doors and handed out pistols, rifles, riot shotguns, and tommy guns to all comers. Even unarmed men joined the fierce fight. Seaman Edward Malaney fired fares from a Very pistol. David Southwick, a first class fireman, threw his pocketknife, burying it in a German’s stomach, sending him toppling into the water. Chief Boatswain’s Mate Walter Kurz, the mount-two gun captain, heaved a 4-inch shell casing at a German on the sub’s main deck, who also tumbled overboard.

At the height of the one-sided fight, Hutchins repeatedly cautioned his crew not to board. As well as things were going topside—dozens of Germans were dead or adrift, while no Borie crewman had been seriously wounded—below decks was another matter. Heavy seas had twisted the two hulls. This had little effect on U-405’s strong steel-alloy shell, but Borie’s thin steel skin gave way. Water poured into both engine rooms through a portside seam, dislodging plate joints, crushing frames , and hopelessly flooding the forward room. Knowing the engine turbines could run submerged, Chief Engineer Lieutenant Morrison R. Brown, standing in water up to his neck along with Chief Machinist William Green and Lead Machinist Mario Pagnotta, ordered everyone out to concentrate on saving the aft engine space. (Machinist Irving Saum later risked his life returning to the forward room to secure a vital suction valve.)

After 10 minutes, when the seas finally uncoupled the two vessels, its own torpedoes, only to have high seas and the sub’s maneuvering foil the aim. The resumption of U-405 got under way. Borie fired one of U-405’s circling gave Borie no advantage and left it vulnerable to a stern torpedo shot. So Hutchins tried another gambit— switching of the searchlight and temporarily holding fire to convince the Germans the chase was over.

It worked. Radar showed U-405 straightening for a run to the northwest. Accelerating to 27 knots, Borie easily caught up—but this time on the sub’s port side. As soon as the two vessels were broadside, the spotlight flashed, guns boomed, and Hutchins prepared for another ram. This time though, as Borie closed in, it was Hopmann (or whoever remained in charge) who suddenly “bared his teeth”—turning the sub left attempting to barrel into Borie’s aft engine room.

In an impromptu flash of tactical genius, Hutchins reacted. First, using the destroyer’s rudders and faltering power plant, he swung Borie hard to port. Then, as Borie backed and skidded to a near stop: “Okay, Larry, give ’em the starboard battery.”

Larry—Depth Charge Officer Ensign Lawrence Quinn— flicked switches that sent three K-gun depth charges hurtling toward the sub. The charges bracketed U-405’s conning tower—one over, two short, both set to trigger at a depth of just 30 feet. The trio of blasts lifted the sub and deposited its bow very close—no wider than a “coat of paint,” some witnesses later claimed—to Borie’s starboard flank.

As Borie picked up speed to gain sea room, U-405 also got under way, this time astern. But it hadn’t long to live. Just minutes later, after continued gunfire and a second failed torpedo launch by Borie, U-405 finally stalled. Distress fares shot up from the sub’s bridge, and crewmen threw two-man rubber rafts strung together like yellow sausages into the water. Repeated, clearly audible pleas of “Kamarade!” finally silenced Borie’s guns. Afterward, about 20 Germans, the remnants of the crew, got into the rafts. U-405 settled fast by the stern, went under, and exploded.

After one hour and four minutes the battle was over—but not the ordeal. As Borie drifted toward the raft-borne survivors, a white fare blossomed far of. Ten, a warning from soundman Earl Potter: “Torpedoes bearing 220.”

It was all Hutchins needed to hear. “Hard to port heading 220, all available speed.”

The U-405’s rafts were then clustered of to port. Borie’s turn and acceleration knifed its bow straight through them. Bob Maher remembered seeing one young German, arms extended, eyes opened wide, mouth agape in soundless horror. Not one of U-405’s crew was ever found.

After dodging a lone torpedo 30 yards to port, Hutchins set a course north toward the task group. But the worst for his ship and crew still lay ahead

Borie was clear of the battle scene but not U-boat waters. Down to just one engine and knowing that another U-boat might be trailing them, Hutchins ordered zigzagging. Flood waters added both weight and draft, so Borie barely reached 10 knots. Dense fog descended. Seas climbed.

By dawn the fuel oil in Borie’s bunkers was badly contaminated. Condensers were crippled, so there was no

fresh feed water for the boilers. There was only enough gasoline to fuel an auxiliary generator powering radar and radio gear. Soon that was gone, too, leaving Borie blind, speechless, and groping north by dead reckoning alone. Hutchins ordered all hands to lighten ship. They jettisoned virtually all extraneous top gear; fired the remaining torpedoes; rolled the last depth charges; burned of torpedo mounts, K-guns, and gun director; deepsixed the 20mms and all but a few 4-inch rounds. Even the lifeboat went.

Seawater threatened all four boilers. Still determined to save his ship, Hutchins ordered two boilers secured. When the starboard turbine finally gave out, Borie went dead in the water. Acting on a hunch by Borie officer Lieutenant Bob Lord, word passed to collect all lighter fluid, kerosene, and spirits onboard. Within minutes, the brew brought enough life to the auxiliary generator to transmit emergency direction finding signals.

The task group, as beset by fog and high seas as Borie, had long since suspended fight operations. But Borie’s feeble signal supplied a bearing—and enough hope to send out two Avengers to scour the gloom. They spotted Borie at 1130, just 14 miles from Card. The entire task force immediately turned and sped to the rescue. When the Card group hove into sight, aircraft launched to all quadrants to protect against subs. Destroyer Goff approached, stopping bow to bow with Borie, but heaving seas aborted plans to transfer fresh feed water and portable pumps. At 1630, with weather worsening, seas mounting, and Borie listing ominously to port and down by the stern, Hutchins finally ordered abandon ship.

Wind and waves made it impossible to deploy Borie’s starboard life rafts. Sailors, most donning inflatable or kapok life jackets, went over at the port rails. Water temperature hovered in the mid-40s. After darkness set in, raft-bound survivors, still clinging to their hopes, lost sight of their rescuers—and their rescuers of them. Some men were crushed and killed when destroyer Barry’s bow plowed through a cluster of rafts. All bravado then faded and desperation set in. Barry and Goff made repeated passes as rescue details manned the rails. Throughout the night, realizing now that survival hinged on individual initiative, many Borie men braved fateful jumps from raft to deck. Most landed in the strong grasp of waiting saviors— 23 crewmen were hauled onboard Barry, 106 onboard Goff.

Among the 129 exhausted, freezing, and grateful survivors were skipper Hutchins (afterward recipient of a Navy Cross); executive officer Philip Brown; boatswain Kurz; fire controlmen Allegri and Maher; fireman Southwick; gunnery officer Dietz; gunner Wenz; helmsman Aikenhead; machinists Green, Pagnotta (both to be Silver Star recipients), and Saum (a Navy Cross recipient); soundmen Kent, Potter, and Manning; seaman Malaney; torpedo chief Cronin; and torpedo officer Quinn. Among the 22 lost were engineering officer Morrison Brown (recipient of a posthumous Navy Cross) and officer Lord.

Though abandoned, Borie did not go easily. It took depth charges to finally send it down, stern first, at 0955, on November 2. In the next weeks, press coverage and plaudits were heaped on Borie and its valiant crew, culminating in a Presidential Unit Citation. While their fight with U-405 was not the last toe-to-toe brawl between the crews of a U-boat and a destroyer—six months later, in the Central Atlantic, the crew of U.S. Navy destroyer escort Buckley (DE-51) skippered by an officer even younger than Hutchins, fought hand to hand for 16 minutes with German sailors after ramming and sinking U-66—it was sweet vindication for all the tin-can men who had served so long and thanklessly in the epic Battle for the North Atlantic.

David Sears, historian and author, is a former U.S. Navy officer with extensive sea duty aboard a destroyer. His most recent books, on naval aviation, are Such Men as These (2011) and Pacific Air (2012).

Originally published in the April 2014 issue of Military History Quarterly.

New 05-17-17

Guthrie, Andrew T.

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.alamancelibraries.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/17/2013/10/LIB-LH-Alamance_County_World_War_II_Deaths-JUL152009-MS.pdf

Torpedoman’s Mate 3rd Class, United States Navy

Declared dead on May 6, 1946 after being reported missing in action.

Awarded the Purple Heart

Memorial among Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery in Manila, Philippines.

Source: American Battle Monuments Commission website

New 05-17-17

Vermilion Ohio, A Good Place to Live

http://www.vermilionohio.org/vermviews/vermviews-491.htm

TM 2C PATRICK HOLLAND

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

U.S. Navy Torpedoman Mate 2nd Class Patrick Holland son of Mrs. J.T. Holland of Darrow Road, Vermilion, Ohio had been in the U.S. Navy for thirteen years. While serving aboard a Mosquito Boat (i.e. a motor torpedo boat – PT Boat – a small high-speed warship designed for torpedo attacks in coastal waters) he was reported missing on February 10th 1943 near the Solomon Islands. Never found, he became Vermilion’s first casualty of the war. He was 36 years old. His brother (below) was also lost.

CHIEF TM MICHAEL HOLLAND

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

U.S. Navy Chief Torpedoman Michael Holland, following in his older brother’s footsteps (above), was a twelve-year Navy veteran. He spent ten of those years in the torpedo division. In November of 1942 he graduated from a submarine base in Rhode Island, and left the states that December.

Just ten days following the receipt of a telegram informing his mother of the death of his older brother Michael’s wife, Ilene and their two children of Huron, Ohio, received notice that the 28 years old sailor was also “missing in action”. Both men were later listed as being “buried at sea.”

Both Michael and Patrick were born in Lorain, but moved to Vermilion township around 1918, and attended school in Vermilion. Michael had served fours years in the area of China. His brother Patrick had served there eight years. The men were two of a family fifteen children. Their father had passed on a few years prior to their demise.

New 05-17-17

Calhoun Chronicle's Salute To Veterans

Cecil Sturm - Chief Torpedoman, Navy

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.calhounchronicle.com/Pages/Current Pages/Archives/Miscellaneous/Posted/Salute To Veterans 2010.htm 

NAVY

Cecil Sturm - Chief Torpedoman, Navy, Pacific Theater, USS Yorktown, USS Wailer, First WWII Purple Heart in Calhoun County.

New 05-17-17

In Memoriam
Men from Wabash County, Indiana
Who Died in WW II

http://www.ingenweb.org/inwabash/wwii-mem.html 

Transcribed by Ron Woodward from book entitled In Memoriam, prepared by the Thomas Stineman Post No. 15 of the American Legion, Mrs. Jeanne Grover, Forrest G. Baer and W.W. Wimberly. 52 pages, no date of publication given. Text mixed with photographs. If anyone reading the list would like a scan of a photograph I would be glad to provide one for them. Email: drwoodward@cinergymetro.net

 MAX M. ROGERS 20, torpedoman third class in the U.S. Navy

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

MAX M. ROGERS 20, torpedoman third class in the U.S. Navy, was lost in
action while on combat duty at sea in the south Pacific aboard the submarine Harder.

Loss of the ship during October with her entire crew was not revealed until January. Torpeodoman Rogers made his home with his grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Justus Rogers, Wabash Rural Route 4.

He was graduated from lagro High School in l942 and enlisted in the navy the following October. Other survivors include his mother, Mrs. S.J. White,
Ijamsville.

New 05-17-17

Chief Torpedoman's Mate Alfred Norwood

http://pt-king.gdinc.com/Tulagi.html

The Tulagi Scene

October 1942-February 1943

July 1942-April 1943

PT Boats

February 17, 1943: Five men of Squadron Three recieve awards for valor for actions during October-November 1942. (L-r): Chief Torpedoman's Mate Alfred Norwood, PT 61; Ship's Cook 1/c Carl Todd, PT 48; Gunner's Mate 1/c Benjamin Parrish, PT 61; Quartermaster's Mate 1/c Lee Bagby, PT 39; and Chief Quartermaster's Mate John Legg, PT 37. (PT Boats, Inc.)

The establishment of a base for the care and feeding of motor torpedo boats at Tulagi began in late September 1942, when Lt. j/g Robert C. Wark arrived on Guadalcanal and reported to Maj. Gen. Alexander A. Vandergrift, commander of the First Marine Division. Lieutenant Wark was from the first section of Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron Three, which was at that moment at Noumea, New Caledonia preparing for transportation to the area. Lieutenant Wark's task was to make the necessary arrangements for the establishment of the new PT base.

After meeting with the Marine commander, Lieutenant Wark later proceeded to Tulagi to call upon Vandergrift's deputy, Brig. Gen. William Rupertus. Accompanying the lieutenant was Comdr. James P. Compton, Commander, Naval Activities, Guadalcanal. Tulagi, the Marine general and the two naval officers sailed to Gavutu to determine its desirability for Squadron Three’s setting up shop—but a quick preliminary survey promptly decided that it would be quite unsuitable for the squadron's new home.

The battle to secure the island had been particularly savage; the terrain was thoroughly devastated, the island was too vulnerable to shelling from the sea as well as air attack, and provided any prospective base too little cover from enemy air reconnaissance.

One further consideration also eliminated Gavutu from the short list of suitable sites—the presence of numerous, partially exposed and rotting corpses—the remains of Japanese soldiers who had been killed during the fighting.

Returning to Tulagi, Rupertus, Compton, and Wark examined a cove located at a small village on the northeast side of the island. In the days when Tulagi was the seat of British colonial government in the Solomons, the village, spelled in various documents as Sesape, Sesapi, Sasapi, or Sasappi, was a small but thriving Chinese trading town, and had been the center of what passed as the local “shipbuilding” industry, complete with a dock and a marine railway for hauling vessels out of the water for repair.

After the Marines landed in August 1942 and wiped out the Japanese garrison defending Tulagi, very little remained of what once was a blossoming little community. During the battle for the island’s possession, the dock was completely destroyed, burned down to the waterline; the marine railway was demolished; and the native buildings, which were nothing more than shacks made with poles placed upright and topped with V-shaped thatched roofs (home to all manner of native bugs and other assorted critters) had been heavily damaged by shells. Despite this, Sesape did offer a few advantages.

First, it was isolated from the main harbor area, so the PT’s would not interfere with other harbor activities. Second, the base had good protection from wind and heavy seas; third, there was better anti-aircraft protection than other areas that the three officers surveyed. Finally, nature’s own geographic barriers, in the shape of nearby Florida Island, made bombardment from the sea nearly impossible.

Admiral Turner was informed of the new site, and upon his approval, development of the new base began immediately. Improvisation was the word of the day—no construction materials were available, and since Tulagi’s Marine contingent was at bare minimum, the only manpower present to aid in the new base's construction was Lieutenant Wark and 59 men from the 6th Naval Construction Battalion led by Lt. Ben Marcus.

 The Construction Battalion--the famed Seabees--patched up a large shack and turned it into the engineering shop and warehouse, while a smaller shack, containing a teakwood floor made of three-inch planks, was transformed into the squadron office.

Sometime later, the first shipment of Squadron Three’s supplies arrived from Noumea aboard cargo ship USS Fuller. Because no working parties were available, the job of unloading fell to Lieutenant Wark and the three enlisted men who accompanied the shipment. It was originally thought packed aboard Fuller were the most critical bits and pieces that the PT’s required, electrical and engineering spare parts such as replacement engines, armatures, magneto points, gaskets, propellers, carburetors, struts, shafts, and so on.

However, when the gear was unloaded, it was found that the majority were things like salt-water soap, toilet paper, and other GSK (general store-keeping) items—-good for improving creature comforts for the PT crews, but but not so good at keeping their boats afloat and running. The lion’s share of engineering and electrical spare parts—important components critically needed in the weeks to come—were still loaded aboard other cargo ships or in crates on the dock back in Noumea.

The rest of Squadron Three's first division arrived in the early morning hours of October 12, 1942. That day and the next saw the squadron hard at work setting up the new base, concluding the work Lieutenant Wark started in making the place presentable.

The base force had the floors of the native shacks, which housed the warehouse, radio hut, engineering shop, and squadron office, reinforced with wood planks and logs. Despite their work, the base remained somewhat austere—at the time there was no drydock, no torpedo compressor, and too few spare parts for the boats.

The arrival of the PT tender Jamestown on October 23rd was a partial relief, but her facilities were too limited to sustain any sort of long-term operations. It was plainly obvious that to take care of the additional squadrons and base personnel expected to arrive from the United States, it was important that Tulagi’s shore facilities be improved and expanded.

Supervised by Lt. Jack Searles and Chief Boatswain's Mate Charles Tufts, the Seabees of the 6th Battalion--now increased to 133 officers and men--dredged and blasted an emergency outlet channel for the harbor, to avoid having PT boats bottled up by enemy warships.

Two PT boat floating drydocks were assembled from pontoons; a 50-man camp was set up; and power and telephone systems to serve the island and harbor area were installed. The detachment also furnished a number of carpenter details to assist with motor torpedo boat maintenance and repair.

Another item that was urgently needed by the PT force was the radio shack. The ships moored along the bank of the Maliali River nullified the signals from Jamestown's radio; in addition, the high hills behind the PT base blocked direct radio transmission between the tender and boats on patrol. Marine headquarters on Tulagi relayed a resume of the day's intelligence from coastwatchers and air scouts, but could not maintain constant communication with boats at sea.

 A temporary solution was to use the radio set up by the naval personnel stationed at Government Wharf. With the arrival of more equipment (mostly obtained by barter or "midnight requisitioning") the torpedo boat men were able to set up their own radio shack at Sesape, powered by a former Japanese diesel generator.

The limited supply of 100-octane fuel was another major problem; the precious liquid, in that area more valuable than gold, was divided between the Tulagi PT's and the airmen on Henderson Field. This often necessitated transferring drum gasoline from Tulagi to Guadalcanal. Once the Jamestown's supply of fuel was exhausted, the boats refueled from 55-gallon drums or from the rubber buoys at NAS Tanambogo. When USS Portland was damaged during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal and laid up for some weeks at Tulagi, the ship generously donated to the PT boats the fuel from her now-useless scout planes as her crew worked to make the damaged cruiser seaworthy.

After the arrival of MTB Squadron Two in December, base facilities expanded even more. The PT organization remained fairly small, but the illness and subsequent evacuation of original Ron Three CO Lieutenant Commander Alan Montgomery in November had left Hugh Robinson, (CO Ron Three) and later, Rollin Westholm (CO Ron Two)—who were both Regular Navy lieutenants—as the senior ranking officers. To exercise some administrative control over the PT's in the area as well the additional squadrons that were soon to come, senior Navy officers felt the Tulagi PT’s needed some sort of overall MTB type command, led by a higher-ranking officer. On December 15, 1942, Comdr. Allen P. Calvert, formerly commander of destroyer USS Craven, arrived at Tulagi to establish Motor Torpedo Boat Flotilla One.

In Commander Calvert's honor, the PT base was named after him; over a main street covered with the pierced steel planking called Marston matting, a rude sign was erected that proclaimed in bold letters.....

 

New 05-17-17

Mid-Atlantic Brawl

Chief Torpedoman Frank G. Cronin

http://www.historynet.com/mid-atlantic-brawl.htm

BY DAVID SEARS

4/6/2017 • MHQ MAGAZINE

Halloween 1943: A no-holds-barred fight breaks out between crews of USS Borie (DD-215) and U-405, with weapons from torpedoes to tommy guns.

For most of the World War II Battle for the North Atlantic, sailors on outmoded U.S. Navy destroyers endured numbing boredom and frustration. But on Halloween 1943 the skipper and crew of USS Borie (DD-215) fought one of the most audacious and desperate sea battles ever.

By spring 1943 the tide in the Battle for the Atlantic, running so long in Germany’s favor, was finally turning. The toll on merchant shipping was still frightful, but the beleaguered Allies were at last able to deploy transformative new resources, tools, and tactics. With the invasion of Europe postponed, shipbuilding shifted from landing craft to indispensable destroyer escorts.

Moreover, American and British hunter-killer groups centered on small “jeep” aircraft carriers were finally ready for duty. And, perhaps most significant for Allied strategy, U.S. Navy Commander in Chief Admiral Ernest J. King had cu

t through interservice clutter and lassitude to establish the Tenth Fleet. Although essentially a paper organization, the Tenth and its commander (nominally King himself but actually his assistant chief of staff, Rear Admiral Francis S. “Frog” Low) would have authority to order any U.S. forces in the Atlantic to take whatever immediate action deemed necessary to counter U-boat threats.

Simultaneously—Allied assessments to the contrary—the Germans were nearing a “crisis of crises.” Stepped-up American antisubmarine warfare in Eastern, Gulf, and Caribbean waters had already compelled German admiral Karl Dönitz to shift Type VII U-boats from the Americas to the open Atlantic.

The medium-size Type VIIs, despite limited endurance and encroaching obsolescence, were the mainstay of Dönitz’s submarine feet and their crews its most experienced. If these boats could somehow shut down North Atlantic shipping, Britain might yet be starved out, denying the Allies a launching pad for the invasion of occupied France.

But things just got worse for the Germans. Accidents, delays, and losses (about a dozen U-boats in March 1943, for example) slowed the growth of the Atlantic submarine force, and with the Allies’ ever more sophisticated and effective countermeasures in resources, tactics, and technology (not just radar, but also “huff duff”—high-frequency direction finding—and decryption of German “Enigma” codes), the German Navy was actually facing disaster.

These big-picture circumstances changed the fortunes of even the smallest players—including aging destroyers like USS Borie (DD-215). Commissioned in 1920, Borie had served in America’s Atlantic, Asiatic, and Pacific Fleets before joining the Western Atlantic Neutrality Patrol, President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s prewar effort to monitor the Western Hemispheric movements of Europe’s belligerent powers.

Serving initially on Inshore Patrol in Panama Bay, Borie eventually shifted to patrol and convoy escort in the Caribbean.

The work was tedious and unrewarding. Lacking radar to foil surface attacks, Borie and its crew were at a disadvantage and seldom got close to the action. In August 1942, however, Borie got a new lease on life—an extensive refit to equip it for oceangoing escort work.

 Borie’s distinctive “four-piper” stacks were trimmed and two of four triple torpedo mounts removed—replaced by six side-firing “K” guns (depth charge projectors) and two single-mount cannons. Most portholes were plated over and the bridge enclosed to afford splinter protection. Even the vestigial crow’s nest on Borie’s main mast gave way to the installation of the antenna for new surface-search radar.

That December Borie also received a new second in command: 30-year-old Lieutenant Charles H. Hutchins—“Hutch” to his friends. Born in Rhode Island, Hutchins had graduated from the Naval Academy in 1936 only to resign his commission two years later, move to Indiana, and begin a career in manufacturing. He rejoined as a Reserve lieutenant (junior grade) when war began, serving a year ashore before assignment to Borie. Sixth months later, on June 6, 1943, Hutchins “fleeted up” to take command of the ship.

Within the month, the young skipper got his first test at sea. On June 17, 1943, while of a convoy, lookouts reported an Borie patrolled the flanks object just 300 yards ahead. After four separate depth charge attacks, the lookouts spotted water boiling up to the surface. Was it evidence of an imploding sub or merely a “water slug”—a compressed-air blast fired as a deception by Borie’s savvy quarry? A final attack produced a slender but indeterminate oil slick. Leaving an army bomber overhead, Borie returned empty-handed to the convoy.

That disappointment was left in the shadows when, after a July period of upkeep and training in New York, Borie joined a task group commanded by Captain Arnold J. “Buster” Isbell aboard escort carrier USS Card (CVE-11). The Card group escorted convoys, but it also could be dispatched by Tenth Fleet for free-ranging hunter-killer missions. However, as Borie’s crew soon learned, their role was primarily defensive. Submarine hunting and killing had become an airborne business.

On the morning of August 7, a team of Card TBF Avengers and F4F Wildcats sank one of two surfaced U-boats only to have the Germans strike back later that day. U-664, skippered by 27-year-old Adolf Graef, a veteran of five patrols with three merchant sinkings, used his boat’s quad and twin 20mm guns to splash an Avenger and a Wildcat.

The next night U-664 even slipped through Card’s destroyer screen (Borie and sister ships Barry [DD-248] and Goff [DD-247]) to fire three torpedoes at the vulnerable carrier. All three missed, sparing Card—and enabling its aviators to exact revenge.

At noon on August 9 an Avenger-Wildcat team surprised U-664, which had surfaced to recharge batteries. Bomb and depth charge explosions caught U-664 at periscope depth and blew it back to the surface. The boat again tried to dive but popped right back up, and its crew jumped ship. Seven hours later Borie’s crew rescued 44 U-664 survivors, including Graef, in their first face-to-face encounter with the enemy.

The Card group’s next chance came in October when Tenth Fleet, acting on timely Enigma decrypts, deployed hunter-killer resources to foil Siegfried, a group of U-boats newly formed to attack mid-Atlantic eastbound convoys. While cargo-laden ships were detoured south of Siegfried, Outbound North 207 (an Allied convoy composed of empty westbound vessels) became “bait.” Escort destroyers ringed ON 207, British escort carrier HMS Biter (D97) cruised in its very center, and British Escort Group B-2, with Tracker (D24) as its nucleus, patrolled nearby.

Soon, two U.S. carrier groups, one centered on Block Island (CVE-21), the other on Card, joined the “great congregation” in the North Atlantic, ostensibly to hunt down Siegfried’s three provisioning U-boats—known as milchkühe, “milk cows.”

Late in the afternoon of October 31, the Card task group hit pay dirt: Avenger pilots sank one of two surfaced U-boats. Concerned that night was falling (and irked that the escaped U-boat might be a milk cow), Captain Isbell sent Borie due east in pursuit. Fighting choppy seas, Borie reached the scene about 2000 hours and shortly thereafter sonar operator Earl J. Potter got a contact, at a range of 6,500 yards.

Closing to a mile, Hutchins swung the ship to starboard to unmask main battery guns. After Borie’s star shells lit up the scene, the sub dived. Radar contact was lost, but sound operator Bob Manning soon established sound contact.

Slowing to close in as the sub crawled northwest at four knots, Borie rolled depth charges and dropped a light marker. The underwater explosion that followed was enough to blow ship fuses and dislodge boiler brickwork. Ten minutes later, with power and sound contact restored and Borie nearing the telltale light marker, crewmen reported “the heavy odor of diesel fuel.”

Borie attacked again—and again withdrew. In the run-up to a third pass, there was a sighting: a sub surfacing—bow high, silhouetted by the marker light—then sliding down stern first. After further search produced no radar, sound, or visual contact, just a long water slick “profusely covered with diesel,” Hutchins was convinced he’d bagged a sub. His dispatch to Card, logged just after midnight on November 1: “Scratch one pig boat
. Am searching for more.”

(Hutchins was wrong. Although severely damaged, U-256 survived. Convinced of their success and collectively stoked with adrenaline, Borie’s crewmen were primed for the even bigger fight to follow.)

Within hours, Bob Manning, stationed now on surface radar, called out another contact, distance 8,000 yards, bearing 170 degrees. Hutchins ordered a turn left and then, with all boilers lit, “Flank speed!” Losing surface contact at 2,800 yards, Hutchins slowed Borie to 15 knots, enabling sound operator Lerten V. Kent to pick up a solid “ping,” 2,000 yards dead ahead.

At 500 yards the contact suddenly slewed right and Borie followed. Five seconds later, answering the order for a deep pattern, Chief Torpedoman Frank G. Cronin released what was supposed to be a few charges. Instead, owing to a malfunction, two entire racks of the “ashcan” charges rolled and erupted with enough force to lift Borie’s stern and shove it forward. Moments later, as if on cue, a sub conning tower broke the surface. “There it is!” cried Bob Maher, Borie’s lead fire controlman, “about 40 feet to the right of the fare.”

 Hutchins ordered the ship’s big searchlight switched on; its beam swung to the port quarter and flooded the target. It was U-405, a Type VIIC sub—though all the Borie crewmen could identify at the time was a milky-gray conning tower emblazoned with the image of a large polar bear.

Borie needed sea room to maneuver and to fight. Out-matched in speed, size, and surface firepower, U-405 had the advantage of a tighter turning radius—which its skipper, 37-year-old Rolf-Heinrich Hopmann, used to good effect. Hutchins ordered Borie to 25 knots. U-405 dropped astern, a gap that opened to 1,400 yards before Borie could turn and close. Meanwhile, though, Borie’s main and secondary batteries opened up. Gun teams on the bigger 4-inchers could fire 33-pound explosive projectiles at a rate of six to eight per minute. The 20mm machine guns (cannons really) could spit 450 canister-fed rounds per minute.

U-405 responded with its own 20mm guns. But just a few rounds struck Borie before its overwhelming return fire cut down Germans on deck sprinting for weapons. Then, once Borie gained broadside, its 4-inchers switched from local to central control. Fire controlman Jim Allegri aimed the three guns that could bear to port. Ten, responding to a “commence firing” order from gunnery officer William Dietz, Bob Maher pressed the firing key and three converging projectiles whooshed in salvo. The second or third of these salvos rocked U-405’s forecastle and, when smoke cleared, its big deck gun—yet to fire—was entirely gone.

Borie’s guns continued to bear, boom, and hammer. U-405, lit by searchlight and streaking tracers, seemed unable to dive. But the boat could still maneuver, and Hopmann again used U-405’s tighter turning circle in efforts to shake loose, or nail Borie with a stern torpedo shot. Maher, stationed atop the flying bridge, witnessed the cat-and-mouse game. Once, when the two vessels appeared about to collide, U-405 put on an evasive burst of speed and Maher got a close look at the Germans as they passed. Some wore sweaters and shorts, others just under wear. Several heads trailed long matted hair while others sported bandanas in green, yellow, and red.

At one point, after the sub finally got of a stern torpedo shot that went wide, Hutchins ordered hard left rudder, hoping to convince the German skipper that Borie would cross astern. It worked—U-405 immediately straightened out. When Hutchins countered with hard right rudder, the two vessels were running parallel, with Borie behind but catching up.

Then, all at once, the sub slowed. A man appeared on its bridge waving his arms. Hutchins commanded, “Cease fire!” But he was too late. In a hail of rounds, the man’s head disappeared—even as his body still stood and his arms still waved. The headless body toppled, U-405 picked up speed, and the deadly chase resumed.

“All right, Aikenhead,” Hutchins told his helmsman, “line her up.” Borie had pulled ahead of U-405, and it was time to move in. Aikenhead spun the wheel to port, aiming the bow to hit the sub’s starboard quarter. “All stations stand by for ram!” Hutchins shouted and phone talkers passed the word across the ship. Men braced for impact: Aikenhead grasped the wheel, Hutchins the screen on the port side pilot house wing; one level up, Dietz and Maher locked arms around the director range finder.

A hard collision was just moments away when U-405 turned hard left as sea swells simultaneously lifted Borie’s bow. Instead of the expected crash, there was a scissoring “soft landing,” which left Borie, engines stopped, riding U-405 bow above bow.

Momentary confusion quickly gave way to frenzy: “Fire! Fire! Open fire!” Hutchins found himself screaming, swinging one arm like a club. Main and secondary batteries had never let up, but now, with targets riding beneath them, it was difficult to aim. The barrels of the 4-inchers could be depressed just 15 degrees; only the aftermost gun could bear—and it could only reach the sub’s main deck aft of the conning tower. Meanwhile, gunners on 20mm cannons three and four—mounted on a raised platform aft amidships—had to fire right through the platform’s weather screen.

Deck guns were not the only weapons at hand; two tommy guns had been retrieved. Hutchins and Borie executive officer Lieutenant Philip Brown fired short bursts to pick of exposed Germans. Unable to find the key to the main deck small-arms locker, Chief Gunner’s Mate Richard Wenz broke through its doors and handed out pistols, rifles, riot shotguns, and tommy guns to all comers. Even unarmed men joined the fierce fight. Seaman Edward Malaney fired fares from a Very pistol. David Southwick, a first class fireman, threw his pocketknife, burying it in a German’s stomach, sending him toppling into the water. Chief Boatswain’s Mate Walter Kurz, the mount-two gun captain, heaved a 4-inch shell casing at a German on the sub’s main deck, who also tumbled overboard.

At the height of the one-sided fight, Hutchins repeatedly cautioned his crew not to board. As well as things were going topside—dozens of Germans were dead or adrift, while no Borie crewman had been seriously wounded—below decks was another matter. Heavy seas had twisted the two hulls. This had little effect on U-405’s strong steel-alloy shell, but Borie’s thin steel skin gave way. Water poured into both engine rooms through a portside seam, dislodging plate joints, crushing frames , and hopelessly flooding the forward room. Knowing the engine turbines could run submerged, Chief Engineer Lieutenant Morrison R. Brown, standing in water up to his neck along with Chief Machinist William Green and Lead Machinist Mario Pagnotta, ordered everyone out to concentrate on saving the aft engine space. (Machinist Irving Saum later risked his life returning to the forward room to secure a vital suction valve.)

After 10 minutes, when the seas finally uncoupled the two vessels, its own torpedoes, only to have high seas and the sub’s maneuvering foil the aim. The resumption of U-405 got under way. Borie fired one of U-405’s circling gave Borie no advantage and left it vulnerable to a stern torpedo shot. So Hutchins tried another gambit— switching of the searchlight and temporarily holding fire to convince the Germans the chase was over.

It worked. Radar showed U-405 straightening for a run to the northwest. Accelerating to 27 knots, Borie easily caught up—but this time on the sub’s port side. As soon as the two vessels were broadside, the spotlight flashed, guns boomed, and Hutchins prepared for another ram. This time though, as Borie closed in, it was Hopmann (or whoever remained in charge) who suddenly “bared his teeth”—turning the sub left attempting to barrel into Borie’s aft engine room.

In an impromptu flash of tactical genius, Hutchins reacted. First, using the destroyer’s rudders and faltering power plant, he swung Borie hard to port. Then, as Borie backed and skidded to a near stop: “Okay, Larry, give ’em the starboard battery.”

Larry—Depth Charge Officer Ensign Lawrence Quinn— flicked switches that sent three K-gun depth charges hurtling toward the sub. The charges bracketed U-405’s conning tower—one over, two short, both set to trigger at a depth of just 30 feet. The trio of blasts lifted the sub and deposited its bow very close—no wider than a “coat of paint,” some witnesses later claimed—to Borie’s starboard flank.

As Borie picked up speed to gain sea room, U-405 also got under way, this time astern. But it hadn’t long to live. Just minutes later, after continued gunfire and a second failed torpedo launch by Borie, U-405 finally stalled. Distress fares shot up from the sub’s bridge, and crewmen threw two-man rubber rafts strung together like yellow sausages into the water. Repeated, clearly audible pleas of “Kamarade!” finally silenced Borie’s guns. Afterward, about 20 Germans, the remnants of the crew, got into the rafts. U-405 settled fast by the stern, went under, and exploded.

After one hour and four minutes the battle was over—but not the ordeal. As Borie drifted toward the raft-borne survivors, a white fare blossomed far of. Ten, a warning from soundman Earl Potter: “Torpedoes bearing 220.”

It was all Hutchins needed to hear. “Hard to port heading 220, all available speed.”

The U-405’s rafts were then clustered of to port. Borie’s turn and acceleration knifed its bow straight through them. Bob Maher remembered seeing one young German, arms extended, eyes opened wide, mouth agape in soundless horror. Not one of U-405’s crew was ever found.

After dodging a lone torpedo 30 yards to port, Hutchins set a course north toward the task group. But the worst for his ship and crew still lay ahead

Borie was clear of the battle scene but not U-boat waters. Down to just one engine and knowing that another U-boat might be trailing them, Hutchins ordered zigzagging. Flood waters added both weight and draft, so Borie barely reached 10 knots. Dense fog descended. Seas climbed.

By dawn the fuel oil in Borie’s bunkers was badly contaminated. Condensers were crippled, so there was no

fresh feed water for the boilers. There was only enough gasoline to fuel an auxiliary generator powering radar and radio gear. Soon that was gone, too, leaving Borie blind, speechless, and groping north by dead reckoning alone. Hutchins ordered all hands to lighten ship. They jettisoned virtually all extraneous top gear; fired the remaining torpedoes; rolled the last depth charges; burned of torpedo mounts, K-guns, and gun director; deepsixed the 20mms and all but a few 4-inch rounds. Even the lifeboat went.

Seawater threatened all four boilers. Still determined to save his ship, Hutchins ordered two boilers secured. When the starboard turbine finally gave out, Borie went dead in the water. Acting on a hunch by Borie officer Lieutenant Bob Lord, word passed to collect all lighter fluid, kerosene, and spirits onboard. Within minutes, the brew brought enough life to the auxiliary generator to transmit emergency direction finding signals.

The task group, as beset by fog and high seas as Borie, had long since suspended fight operations. But Borie’s feeble signal supplied a bearing—and enough hope to send out two Avengers to scour the gloom. They spotted Borie at 1130, just 14 miles from Card. The entire task force immediately turned and sped to the rescue. When the Card group hove into sight, aircraft launched to all quadrants to protect against subs. Destroyer Goff approached, stopping bow to bow with Borie, but heaving seas aborted plans to transfer fresh feed water and portable pumps. At 1630, with weather worsening, seas mounting, and Borie listing ominously to port and down by the stern, Hutchins finally ordered abandon ship.

Wind and waves made it impossible to deploy Borie’s starboard life rafts. Sailors, most donning inflatable or kapok life jackets, went over at the port rails. Water temperature hovered in the mid-40s. After darkness set in, raft-bound survivors, still clinging to their hopes, lost sight of their rescuers—and their rescuers of them. Some men were crushed and killed when destroyer Barry’s bow plowed through a cluster of rafts. All bravado then faded and desperation set in. Barry and Goff made repeated passes as rescue details manned the rails. Throughout the night, realizing now that survival hinged on individual initiative, many Borie men braved fateful jumps from raft to deck. Most landed in the strong grasp of waiting saviors— 23 crewmen were hauled onboard Barry, 106 onboard Goff.

Among the 129 exhausted, freezing, and grateful survivors were skipper Hutchins (afterward recipient of a Navy Cross); executive officer Philip Brown; boatswain Kurz; fire controlmen Allegri and Maher; fireman Southwick; gunnery officer Dietz; gunner Wenz; helmsman Aikenhead; machinists Green, Pagnotta (both to be Silver Star recipients), and Saum (a Navy Cross recipient); soundmen Kent, Potter, and Manning; seaman Malaney; torpedo chief Cronin; and torpedo officer Quinn. Among the 22 lost were engineering officer Morrison Brown (recipient of a posthumous Navy Cross) and officer Lord.

Though abandoned, Borie did not go easily. It took depth charges to finally send it down, stern first, at 0955, on November 2. In the next weeks, press coverage and plaudits were heaped on Borie and its valiant crew, culminating in a Presidential Unit Citation. While their fight with U-405 was not the last toe-to-toe brawl between the crews of a U-boat and a destroyer—six months later, in the Central Atlantic, the crew of U.S. Navy destroyer escort Buckley (DE-51) skippered by an officer even younger than Hutchins, fought hand to hand for 16 minutes with German sailors after ramming and sinking U-66—it was sweet vindication for all the tin-can men who had served so long and thanklessly in the epic Battle for the North Atlantic.

David Sears, historian and author, is a former U.S. Navy officer with extensive sea duty aboard a destroyer. His most recent books, on naval aviation, are Such Men as These (2011) and Pacific Air (2012).

Originally published in the April 2014 issue of Military History Quarterly.

New 05-17-17

Guthrie, Andrew T.

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.alamancelibraries.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/17/2013/10/LIB-LH-Alamance_County_World_War_II_Deaths-JUL152009-MS.pdf

Torpedoman’s Mate 3rd Class, United States Navy

Declared dead on May 6, 1946 after being reported missing in action.

Awarded the Purple Heart

Memorial among Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery in Manila, Philippines.

Source: American Battle Monuments Commission website

New 05-17-17

Vermilion Ohio, A Good Place to Live

http://www.vermilionohio.org/vermviews/vermviews-491.htm

TM 2C PATRICK HOLLAND

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

U.S. Navy Torpedoman Mate 2nd Class Patrick Holland son of Mrs. J.T. Holland of Darrow Road, Vermilion, Ohio had been in the U.S. Navy for thirteen years. While serving aboard a Mosquito Boat (i.e. a motor torpedo boat – PT Boat – a small high-speed warship designed for torpedo attacks in coastal waters) he was reported missing on February 10th 1943 near the Solomon Islands. Never found, he became Vermilion’s first casualty of the war. He was 36 years old. His brother (below) was also lost.

CHIEF TM MICHAEL HOLLAND

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

U.S. Navy Chief Torpedoman Michael Holland, following in his older brother’s footsteps (above), was a twelve-year Navy veteran. He spent ten of those years in the torpedo division. In November of 1942 he graduated from a submarine base in Rhode Island, and left the states that December.

Just ten days following the receipt of a telegram informing his mother of the death of his older brother Michael’s wife, Ilene and their two children of Huron, Ohio, received notice that the 28 years old sailor was also “missing in action”. Both men were later listed as being “buried at sea.”

Both Michael and Patrick were born in Lorain, but moved to Vermilion township around 1918, and attended school in Vermilion. Michael had served fours years in the area of China. His brother Patrick had served there eight years. The men were two of a family fifteen children. Their father had passed on a few years prior to their demise.

New 05-17-17

 

TMC Harry Foster Mills

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=56125848

Memorial

Birth: Oct. 19, 1914

Death: Dec. 21, 1944, At Sea

US Navy WORLD WAR II

Chief Torpedoman's Mate, Harry F. Mills MIA/KIA

Hometown: New Harmony, Indiana

Ship: USS Scamp (SS-277)

Service # 2914625

Awards: Purple Heart

New 05-16-17

 

On Eternal Patrol - Lost Submariners of World War II

Charles William Hunt

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.oneternalpatrol.com/hunt-c-w.htm

Rank/Rate Torpedoman's Mate, Third Class

Service Number 291 72 52

Birth Date May 20, 1924

From Indianapolis, Indiana

Decorations Purple Heart

Submarine USS Grayling (SS-209)

Loss Date September 9, 1943

Location In or near Tablas Strait, Philippine Islands

Circumstances Lost at sea, cause unknown

Remarks Charles was born in Hendricks County, Indiana.

New 05-16-17

Donald R Ragan of Indiana was killed in South Pacific WWII

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

https://www.ancestry.com/boards/thread.aspx?mv=flat&m=440&p=surnames.ragan

Name: Donald R Ragan

Inducted From: Indiana

Rank: Torpedoman's Mate Second Class

Combat Organization: United States Navy

Death Date: 25 Nov 1945

Monument: Fort William McKinley, Manila, The Philippines

Last Known Status: Missing

U.S. Awards: Purple Heart Medal

Dave_Dwiggins (View posts)

Posted: 25 Jun 2005 09:20AM

=Classification: Query

Edited: 26 Jun 2005 09:36PM

Donald R. Ragan of Indiana was declared killed in action November 25, 1945, while serving in the South Pacific during World War II.

He is officially listed as missing or buried at sea and his name appears on the "Tablets of the Missing" at the Manila American Cemetery in the Philippines. We are seeking information regarding his military and civilian life and especially locate any family members still living so we can send them the free photographs of his grave site and the beautiful memorial in the Philippines.

I am a retired Hoosier from Madison County Indiana residing in the Philippines with my Filipino wife. We are seeking family and military information of nearly a thousand servicemen from Indiana killed in the South Pacific during World War II. There are 17,206 Americans buried here and thousands more that are missing or buried at sea and are honored on the "Tablets of the Missing". Please visit our website to see the beautiful memorial located in Manila, Philippines.

http://fizkid.tripod.com/

My wife and I visited the cemetery as visitors and left with a mission in our heart. We have been taking photographs of the graves of the Indiana servicemen buried here and have been uniting them (at no charge) with their family members in Indiana and across the United States. To receive the photo of your family member, neighbor or friend all you need is a working email address. We do not send them to regular mailing addresses due to the costs. Please help us find the families of the men that might still be living. Our project is only successful because of teamwork and your contributions are noted on our website. If you wish to help us we will be pleased to add your name to our ACKNOWLEDGMENT page on the website. The obituaries usually did not appear till to three months after the death date.

If you are not a genealogist you can help by just picking up the telephone directory and find someone with the same last name and give them a call. It has worked many times for us.

Zenas5@yahoo.com

Sincerely,

Dave and Apple Dwiggins

San Pablo City, Philippines

New 05-16-17

William Ireland - World War II Battle Death File

Torpedoman's Mate

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.americanbattlegraves.com/index.php?page=directory&rec=69193

About This Data Record

Introduction - May 13, 2017 - This casualty or military death war record for Torpedoman's Mate Ireland, first name William is just one of over 103,014 found in our historical archive for U.S. servicemen and civilians who were killed in action during World War I, World War II, and Korean War. Please be aware that some information may have been corrupted or lost over time and stages of data conversion.

Personnel File Core Info:

Name William Ireland

From Indiana

Service Number 2917237

Rank Torpedoman's Mate

Service Second Class, U.S. Navy

Regiment United States Navy

War World War II

Date Death 08-23-1946

Awards Purple Heart

Burial Missing in Action or Buried at Sea, Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines

Cemetery Details Manila, Philippines

New 05-15-17

 

Harold 0. Pfaff, torpedo man 3c in the Navy

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/156884707/

June 23, 1943 ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL rage Five DONALD NELS&V ILL Recalls U-Boat WASHINGTON, June 28 Donald M. Nelson, War Production Board chairman, whose cold Navy Torpedo Man and Army Nurse Hold Reunion in Honolulu.

Harold 0. Pfaff, torpedo man 3c in the Navv, son of Mr. and Only five-sixths of. Ireland is Eire the balance is included in Nortnern Ireland, politically a member of the United Kingdom.

New 05-14-17

Stanley Gorman Coates

Torpedoman's Mate (Electrical) First Class

Stanley Gorman Coates Collection

http://memory.loc.gov/diglib/vhp/bib/loc.natlib.afc2001001.82115

Biographical Information

Name: Stanley Gorman Coates

Home State: TX

Note Veteran was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Gender Male

Race White

War or Conflict

World War, 1939-1945

Military Status Veteran

Dates of Service 1942-1946

Entrance into Service Enlisted

Branch of Service Navy

Unit of Service USS Blackfin (SS 322)

Location of Service Farragut, Idaho; San Diego, California; Hunters Point, San Francisco, California; Samar, Philippines; Subic Bay, Philippines; Luzon, Philippines

Highest Rank Torpedoman's Mate (Electrical) First Class

Prisoner of War No

War or Conflict Korean War, 1950-1953

Military Status Veteran

Dates of Service 1951-1952

Entrance into Service Enlisted

Branch of Service Navy

Highest Rank Torpedoman's Mate (Electrical) First Class

Prisoner of War No

New 05-14-17

Murill E. Clark

Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

Murill E. Clark Collection

http://memory.loc.gov/diglib/vhp/bib/loc.natlib.afc2001001.48878
 
Biographical Information

Name: Murill E. Clark

State of Birth: ID

Home State: CA

Gender Male

Race White

War or Conflict World War, 1939-1945

Military Status Veteran

Dates of Service 1943-1945

Entrance into Service Enlisted

Branch of Service Navy

Unit of Service USS The Sullivans

Location of Service Pacific Theater

Highest Rank Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

Prisoner of War No

Robert Gerald Clark Collection

Stephen E.  Phelps Torpedoman

http://www.oldsaltblog.com/2012/11/seventy-years-ago-today-torpedoman-phelps-and-the-last-ranger-over-the-side-on-the-uss-bernadou/

Seventy Years Ago Today – Torpedoman Phelps and the Last Ranger Over the Side on the USS Bernadou

Today is the 70th anniversary of the WW II invasion of North Africa, which began with the assault and landing in the port of Safi by USS Bernadou, a WW I-vintage destroyer that had been stripped down for stealth and draft. My father, Stephen E. Phelps, was a torpedoman aboard her that day; his station as the ship drove into the port was as a loader on that forward 4 gun.

Posted on November 8, 2012 by Stephen Phelps

USS Bernadou (DD-153), At sea during the North African invasion operation, November 1942. The ship’s mast had been removed to facilitate her role in the landings at Safi, Morocco on 8 November 1942
A guest post by Stephen Phelps:

Today is the 70th anniversary of the WW II invasion of North Africa, which began with the assault and landing in the port of Safi by USS Bernadou, a WW I-vintage destroyer that had been stripped down for stealth and draft. My father, Stephen E. Phelps, was a torpedoman aboard her that day; his station as the ship drove into the port was as a loader on that forward 4 gun.

Captain Braddy grounded the ship in order to disembark his 200 Army Rangers. As the Rangers went over the side the ship continued to take small arms fire and the sailors were helping the soldiers over the bows and onto the landing nets with all their gear. As the last Ranger climbed over, with my father helping him, they looked into each other’s eyes. My father said, “Good luck, soldier,” and the Ranger said, “You, too, sailor.”

Fifty years later my father was at a reunion of tin-can sailors in Denver. He and my mother were on the hotel elevator going down to dinner when it stopped at another floor and a man got on. He and my father looked at each other, and the man said, “I know you.” My father said there was something familiar about the guy, but he couldn’t place him. “Do you remember,” the man said, “helping the last Ranger over the side of Bernadou in Safi that day?”

Presidential Unit Citation – USS Bernadou: “For outstanding performance in leading the attack on Safi, French Morocco, November 8, 1942.”

This entry was posted in Lore of the Sea and tagged Stephen E. Phelps, torpedoman, USS Bernadou, WW I-vintage destroyer, WW II invasion of North Africa.

New 05-14-17

 

Howard L Cutler

Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.honorstates.org/index.php?id=34392

World War Two

Howard L Cutler

MIA Declared Missing in Action

Service Details

NAME Howard L Cutler

SERVICE # 5541797

STATE Idaho

CASUALTY 03-09-1944

WAR World War II

SERVICE Navy

SPECIALTY Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

RANK Petty Officer Third Class

DETAILS Missing in action or lost at sea

BURIAL Tablets of the Missing at Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England

AWARDS

Purple Heart

American Campaign Medal

World War II Victory Medal

Combat Action Ribbon

New 05-13-17

Lyle Edwards Smith - Prisoner of War Record

Lyle Edwards Smith was a Torpedoman, Second Class in the Navy during World War II.

http://wwii-pows.mooseroots.com/l/67663/Lyle-Edwards-Smith

Held in Osaka Main Camp Chikko near Osaka, Japan

Lyle Edwards Smith was a Torpedoman, Second Class in the Navy during World War II. Lyle was captured by Imperial Japan while serving in the Philippine Islands, and was sent to Osaka Main Camp Chikko near Osaka, Japan where 4,123 other American POWs were held.

Lyle's capture was first reported to the International Committee of the Red Cross on May 6, 1942, and the last report was made on October 3, 1945.

Based on these two reports, Lyle was imprisoned for at least 1,246 days (3 years and ~6 months), one of the longest durations of captivity recorded.

Ultimately, Lyle was returned to military control, liberated or repatriated.

Lyle Edwards Smith's POW Record

Personal Details

Name Lyle Edwards Smith

Show Original

Race White

State of Residence Colorado

Service Details Torpedoman, Second Class

Rating of Torpedoman, Second Class

Rank Torpedoman, Second Class

Military Branch Navy

Arm or Service United States Navy

Serial Number 3720861

Capture Details Theater of War Southwest Pacific

Capture Country Philippine Islands

Detaining Power Imperial Japan

Internment Camp Osaka Main Camp Chikko

First Report May 6, 1942

Last Report October 3, 1945

Days in Captivity 1,246

Status Returned to Military Control, Liberated or Repatriated

Source of Report Individual has been reported through sources considered official.

New 05-13-17

On Eternal Patrol - Lost Submariners of World War II

Percy Neel

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.oneternalpatrol.com/neel-p.htm

Purple Heart

Rank/Rate Torpedoman's Mate, Second Class

Service Number 368 56 89

Birth Date March 20, 1920

From Grand View, Idaho

Decorations Purple Heart

Submarine USS Wahoo (SS-238)

Loss Date October 11, 1943

Location In La Perouse Strait, Northern Japan

Circumstances Sunk by a combination of air attack and depth charging

Remarks Percy was born in Nampa, Idaho.

Photo and information courtesy of Dixie McDaniel, niece. Additional information courtesy of Paul W. Wittmer.

New 05-13-17

 Chief Torpedoman Mate Robert Fulton

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://tdn.com/print-specific/sans-story/a-tribute-to-the-people-who-made-the-ultimate-sacrifice/article_a74ed6d1-f289-5a0e-b744-bfbb53e68f94.html

26 Castle Rock; missing in action aboard sub, Pompano, September 1943

 

Chief Torpedoman Edward J. Barton

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In peace

http://valor.militarytimes.com/recipient.php?recipientid=306663

Date of death: October 9, 1944

Burial location: Manila, Philippine Islands

Home of record: Portsmouth New Hampshire

Status: KIA

AWARDS AND CITATIONS

Silver Star

See more recipients of this award

Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Chief Torpedoman Edward J. Barton (NSN: 2068261), United States Navy, for gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy in the line of his profession as leading Torpedoman on four successive submarine war patrols in the U.S.S. TRITON (SS-201) in 1942 and 1943.

Through his courage and skill his Commanding Officer was able to inflict serious damage on the enemy.

On one occasion his immediate action in opening the outer door of a tube in which a torpedo was making a hot run prevented serious damage to the tube and to the submarine.

 This action was indicative of the quick thinking and fearless action which he has displayed in all emergencies.

His conduct throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Action Date: 1942 - 1943

Service: Navy

Rank: Chief Torpedoman

Division: U.S.S. Triton (SS-201)

New 05-05-17

Francis ‘Josh’ Herron Torpedoman Chief

http://www.lehi-ut.gov/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/By-Russ-Felt.pdf

Francis enlisted in the United States Navy as a Seaman Apprentice on 15 Aug 1934 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

He was honorably released from Active Duty with the designation of Torpedoman Chief.

Francis ‘Josh’ Herron (Felt line) Charles and Nina Felt Herron married and lived in Lehi, Utah, at 564 West Main Street.

Their home was designed by the Architect of the LDS Tabernacle in Salt Lake City, Utah. The two storied home is now neglected and in disrepair but one can stillreadily see its beautiful potential.

Charles and Nina Herron had three sons, Mark, Max, and Francis. This short biography is about Francis who was born in Lehi, Utah, 5 Mar 1913.

Francis enlisted in the United States Navy as a Seaman Apprentice on 15 Aug 1934 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

During his Navy experience he held various ratings and served on several Submarines (14 to be exact). He was transferred to Fleet Reserve 1 Feb 1957 after 22 yrs of service.

He was honorably released from Active Duty with the designation of Torpedoman Chief.

 Francis Herron Current Congressman and PresidentialCandidate John McCain wrote a book about his father, John Sidney McCain, ‘Faith of My Fathers’. He wrote of World War II and his father’s role in the submarine service.

Francis Herron served under John Sidney McCain aboard the USS Gunnel from May of 1942 to June of 1944.

Chapter Seven of the book offers insights of what Francis Herron experienced.

Off the Canary Islands the Gunnel was hunted by German submarines. The Gunnel was ordered to Scotland and was ‘spotted and chased’ by a U-Boat. During that time and a long way from Scotland, the engines of the Gunnelfailed (Apparently those engines were faulty in several submarines). Auxiliary engines used for lights and air conditioning were used for very slow propulsion. The Gunnel was redirected to Falmouth, England.

During the voyage three ships of unknown origin were spotted and as they approached, the Gunnel prepared to fight.

At the very last moment, the ships were determined to be Allied and a catastrophe was averted. The Gunnel made Falmouth and after repairs, went to Scotland and then to New Hampshire where it was outfitted for combat duty in the Pacific. Francis ‘Josh’ Herron was on that voyage.

John McCain was loved by his men who referred to him as ‘Captain Jack’. “It is said that he made a point of knowing all about the personal lives of the men under his command.” The Gunnel had eight officers and 72 enlisted men on board and John McCain knew each one by first name. It was said that ‘Captain Jack’ knew who was married and how many children each had and who was single. He knew whose wife was expecting a child and which gender they hoped to have. It is reasonable that he knew all about Francis Herron and his life.

He would even have known about Francis’ life back home.

After a night partying in Fremantle, Australia, the crew was called together. The Commander said to them, “Fellows, we’re going to fight the ****** Japanese. We’re gonna fight these ******, and we we’re going to lick’em. We’re not gonna let these Js hide from us. We’ll fight’em even if we have to go into their harbors to find them, and they’re gonna be ****** sorry we did. I’ll tell you that. Now, every man who wants to go with me, take one step forward, and anyone who doesn’t, stay right where you are.” With roaring approval every man stepped forward. Francis Herron stepped forward.

It is said that John Sidney McCain never lost the respect of the men who sailed under his command. He taught them their duty, as they taught him his, and he made them proud to carry out their duties. He looked after his crew. Francis Herron was one of those men.
On return from a patrol to Fremantle, Australia, an Allied Bomber mistakenly made a bomb run at the Gunnel and the bombs narrowly missed but shook the submarine. At dock the Commander called for the two largest men on board. After determining the proper signal was given to the Bomber and that it was ignored, the commander told the two, “Men, I want you to go find the ***** who did this to us, and take care of them. You got that?” They did not find the Bomber crew.

The Gunnel patrolled between Midway and Nagaski. On 18 Jun, near Korea, they sighted seven large Japanese freighters and two smaller vessels. The ships were at fullspeed and they changed course every ten minutes. The Navigation Officer determined they were headed to Shanghai. The Gunnelsurfaced to increase its speed to get ahead of the convoy during the night. The Gunnelsubmerged near dawn and stayed at periscope depth until close to the convoy. Torpedoes were fired and freighters were sunk. The Gunnel dove and depth charges were dropped to attack it.

The click of the detonator could be heard in the Gunnel at first. “But the explosion was the worst.” Crew members bent their knees to absorb the shock of the depth charges. It was said that other crews had men with broken legs who stood too rigidly. One of the ships dropped a grapnel, trying to ‘hook’ the Gunnel, but it dragged along the port side ‘rattling slowly and excruciatingly.’

The Commander later said, “The chains of Marley’s ghost sounded much like that to old Scrooge.” The Gunnelsubmerged to 300 ft and ran at that depth for several hours. Nearby Destroyers were sent to attack the Gunnel. Water was allowed to flood the submarine tanks to keep it submerged at those great depths. The air was foul and religious men worshipped. During the night, the Gunnel surfaced.

A Destroyer was spotted and the Gunnel was turned astern and the order given to fire the stern torpedoes. The Destroyer was firing and the order given to submerge. The Destroyer was hit but depth charges were released to hit the Gunnel.

 “The awesome sounds of exploding depth charges and collapsing bulkheads as the warship rapidly sank close astern of the Gunnel was an unforgettable

experience for all hands.” Francis Herron was on board. Would he have been the torpedoman to fire the torpedoes?

The Gunnelsubmerged to 300 ft and remained on the bottom for some 18 hours. On 20 Jun this was the experience of the crew with everything being done to reduce the need for failing oxygen levels. Some men wept and some become delirious and one had to be strapped down. The crew grew toward ‘frantic desperation.’

“Now they were sweating out endless hours, fathoms down, exhausted, slowly suffocating while their sub faced the imminent prospect of lying dead in the water.” The temperature reached 120 degrees and the humidity was 100 %.

The decision was made to slowly surface and fight it out with whomever and try to run as the batteries were recharged.

The other option was to surface, destroy classified materials, scuttle the Gunnel and put the men overboard to be captured.Upon surfacing, the Gunnel spotted a Destroyer but was not detected and the Gunnel ran for safety.

The Gunnel reached Midway some ten days later and the commander said, ”I suspect the men were never so happy to see that dull uninteresting island.”

Francis Herron was there for that experience.

New 05-05-17

Submarine USS O-9 (SS-70)

http://subvetpaul.com/USS-O-9.htm

On 22 June 1941, Secretary of the Navy Knox conducted memorial services for the 34 officers and men who were lost on USS O-9.

USS O-9 (SS-70) was struck from the Navy Register on 23 October 1941 ... and remains in the depths off the Isles of Shoals.

The following 34 officers and men went to the bottom in USS O-9 when she made her last dive on 20 June 1941.

Sailors Rest Your Oar

May They Rest In peace

Torpedoman's Mate Third Class Robert A. Gardner

Torpedoman's Mate Second Class Francis L. Gruen

Torpedoman's Mate Third Class Levitt E. Krueger

Torpedoman's Mate Chief William C. Wolf

By: Robert Loys Sminkey,

Commander, United States Navy, Retired

Submarine USS O-9 (SS-70) was authorized to be built by the United States Congressional Act of 3 March 1915, which stated in part:

"...Two submarines to be of seagoing type to have a surface speed of twenty-five knots or more if possible, but not less than twenty knots, to cost, exclusive of armor and armament, not exceeding $1,500,000 each, and sixteen submarines to cost, exclusive of armor and armament, not exceeding $550,000 each, and the sum of $4,090,000 is here-by appropriated for said purpose to be available until expended.
. . . . .
"Five of the submarine torpedo boats herein authorized shall be built on the Pacific coast: PROVIDED, That the cost of construction on the Pacific coast does not exceed the cost of construction on the Atlantic coast plus the cost of transportation from the Atlantic to the Pacific..."

The keel of USS O-9 (SS-70) was laid down on 15 February 1917 by the Fore River Shipbuilding Company at Quincy, Massachusetts ... under a subcontract from the Electric Boat Company of New York.

NAVY RUSHES AID TO LOCATE CRAFT, DOWN IN 375 FEET

PORTSMOUTH, N.H., June 20,-(AP)-The submarine O-9, one of the Navy's oldest, failed to come to the surface after a test dive off the Isles of Shoals Friday, and Navy officials expressed fear for the lives of the approximately 30 men aboard.

At 2:30 p.m., Eastern standard time, the recently recommissioned submarine had been under the surface in crushingly deep water for more than five hours.

The depth of the spot where the O-9 was diving was reported as 370 feet, and was only a short distance from where the Squalus crashed to the bottom in May, 1939, with the loss of 26 lives.

In a sensational rescue, 33 of the Squalus' officers and men were saved by a new diving bell, but that shining new craft rested in only 240 feet of water and was equipped to handle the diving bell on a special escape hatch.
 

New 05-05-17

Tambor's Chief Torpedoman Murry Cherry standing in front of the "Christmas Tree".

http://blalock.lancedean.com/blalock2.html

Perhaps this is where my mother got her name?

New 05-05-17

USS Piper Assn Photo Gallery

http://webpages.charter.net/usspiper/photogallery.html


 
Hawaii, 1945
Standing: "Pablo" and "Wiz". Seated: John Clarkin
Photo courtesy of John Clarkin - USS Piper 1944-1945
 

New 05-05-17

James Kondrat Collection Chief Torpedoman's Mate

http://memory.loc.gov/diglib/vhp/bib/loc.natlib.afc2001001.15721

Biographical Information

Name: James Kondrat

State of Birth: IL

Home State: NH

Gender Male

Race Unspecified

War or Conflict

World War, 1939-1945

Military Status Veteran

Dates of Service 1940-1961

Entrance into Service Enlisted

Branch of Service Navy

Location of Service Atlantic; Pacific

Highest Rank Chief Torpedoman's Mate

Prisoner of War No

New 05-05-17

New Hampshire Genealogy Archives

http://nhgenealogy.blogspot.com/2011/10/new-hampshire-world-war-ii-casualties.html

Edward J. Barton

Chief Torpedoman's Mate, U.S. Navy

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In peace

Service # 2068261

United States Navy

Entered the Service from: New Hampshire

Died: 9-Oct-44

Missing in Action or Buried at Sea

Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery

Manila, Philippines

Awards: Silver Star, Purple Heart

Updated 05-04-17

Frederick R. Bockman

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In peace

Torpedoman's Mate, Third Class, U.S. Navy

Service # 8067179

United States Naval Reserve

Entered the Service from: New Hampshire

Died: 6-Apr-45

Missing in Action or Buried at Sea

Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial

Honolulu, Hawaii

Awards: Purple Heart

Updated 05-04-17

Carmine Anthony Parziale

Torpedoman’s Mate, Third Class

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In peace

http://ussgrunion.com/blog/2012/07/04/carmine-anthony-parziale/

When Carmen graduated from Weedville High School in June, 1940 at age nineteen, he wanted to make the Navy his career, so he enlisted for six years at the Navy Recruiting Station, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and transferred to the Naval Training Station, Newport, Rhode Island for recruit training. Upon completion in August he was assigned to the submarine U.S.S. Barracuda (SS-163) at the Navy Yard in Portsmouth, New Hampshire during her fitting out. On December 8, 1941 he entered Torpedo School at Naval Torpedo Station Newport, Rhode Island. He graduated sixth in his class of one hundred and nine in March, 1942, received his rating of Torpedoman’s Mate Third Class, and joined the crew of the submarine U.S.S. Grunion (SS-216) at her commissioning on April 11, 1942, his twenty first birthday.

Posted on Wednesday 4 July 2012

Age: 21

Birthplace: Weedville, Pennsylvania

Marital status: Single

Acknowledgements: Faye Buck, sister; Francis Gerber, brother-in-law; Mary Bentz, Janet Mehall, JoAnne Gari, nieces; Irvin Zaleski, Jr., nephew; William Aumen, great nephew; Vincent and Elizabeth Parziale, cousins; Mary Parziale, cousin; Evo Facchine, Mt. Zion Historical Society DuBois,PA ; Ronald G. Falconberry, (TN) Suite101.com; Courier Express; Bradford Pearson, Gazette, Montgomery County MD; The Bennetts Valley (PA) News; David Hanners, The (Twin Cities, MN) Pioneer Press; David Sills, Brownsville (TN) States-Graphics; Becky Polaski, The (St. Marys, PA) Daily Press; Heather Tressler, The Ridgway (PA) Record and The (St. Marys, PA) Daily Press

Carmine Anthony “Carmen” Parziale was born to Louise (Cimenari) and Ralph Parziale on April 11, 1921, in Weedville, Pennsylvania. His father died three years later, leaving his wife to tend the farm and raise nine children. Her daughters recalled that the authorities were concerned that she could not raise the children on her own; but she wasn’t about to give them up. Being the resourceful person that she was, she farmed the land, raised cows, chickens and even a goat, and sold vegetables and cheeses. She saved her money and invested in rental properties.

When Carmen graduated from Weedville High School in June, 1940 at age nineteen, he wanted to make the Navy his career, so he enlisted for six years at the Navy Recruiting Station, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and transferred to the Naval Training Station, Newport, Rhode Island for recruit training. Upon completion in August he was assigned to the submarine U.S.S. Barracuda (SS-163) at the Navy Yard in Portsmouth, New Hampshire during her fitting out. On December 8, 1941 he entered Torpedo School at Naval Torpedo Station Newport, Rhode Island. He graduated sixth in his class of one hundred and nine in March, 1942, received his rating of Torpedoman’s Mate Third Class, and joined the crew of the submarine U.S.S. Grunion (SS-216) at her commissioning on April 11, 1942, his twenty first birthday.

Growing up in this very small rural Western Pennsylvania town of Weedville, his friends and family knew him to be a quiet, personable boy with a great disposition, who enjoyed teasing his mother and eight siblings, especially his younger sister Mary. This self-taught, accomplished musician organized his own small orchestra called The Merry Makers that played regularly in local night spots. This talent got him a place in a Navy Band. When stationed in Rhode Island he had the honor of playing for President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Carmen’s sister Faye recalled that on a surprise furlough he was thrilled that he would be going to a brand new submarine U.S.S. Grunion. What he did not tell her, but prophetically what he did tell a hometown friend, was that he just knew this would be his last time home.

Carmen’s mother had no telephone. So on September 30, 1942, it was Coppollo’s Grocery Store in Weedville that received the phone call with the telegram from the Department of the Navy informing her that her son was declared missing in action. His mother, a Gold Star Mother, never gave up hope for his return. For years, each day, one of her children had to go to meet the morning train because Carmen just might be coming home.

In 2009 Carmen’s nieces Mary Bentz and Janet Mehall placed a memorial marker at the foot of his mother’s grave at St. Joseph’s Cemetery in Force, Pennsylvania, with full military honors.

Copyright © 2012 Mary Bentz. All Rights Reserved

New 05-04-17

About George Laderbush (1923-1944)

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In peace

https://www.library.unh.edu/find/archives/collections/george-laderbush-papers-1931-2010

He entered the US Navy and trained as a torpedoman in Newport, Rhode Island before shipping off for active duty aboard the USS Flier. He served as a Torpedoman's Mate, Second Class in the Pacific Fleet and spent time in California, Hawaii, Australia, and Midway Island.

George Robert Laderbush was born June 26, 1923 in Greenland, NH, the eighth of eleven children born to Albert and Stella Laderbush.

He attended St. Patrick's Catholic School, where he played basketball on the school's team. He graduated from Portsmouth High School in 1941.

After graduation, he worked for a time at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. He entered the US Navy and trained as a torpedoman in Newport, Rhode Island before shipping off for active duty aboard the USS Flier. He served as a Torpedoman's Mate, Second Class in the Pacific Fleet and spent time in California, Hawaii, Australia, and Midway Island. On August 13, 1944, while making their way toward an enemy convoy in the South China Sea, the Flier hit a mine and sank. Forteen men survived the initial blast and sinking, though only eight made it to land and were eventually rescued. Seventy-eight men, including Laderbush, were killed. Citing the need to keep survivors safe, the Navy kept details of the disaster hidden from the public, listing the submarine only as having seen "recent action" in their official reports and press releases. George Laderbush and the other men who died were listed as "missing in action," until they were official declared "killed in action" on January 19, 1946.

George Laderbush was posthumously awarded a Purple Heart in "recognition of devoted and selfless consecration to the service of our country."

New 05-04-17

World War 2 - United States Navy at War

UNITED STATES NAVY CASUALTIES

Part 1 - BY NAME, 1941-45, HAAB to HYSS

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://www.naval-history.net/WW2UScasaaDB-USNbyNameH.htm

HAGUE, Raymond M, TM2

HAGUE, Raymond M, TM2, 6483045, USNR, from Kansas, USS Maddox, location Mediterranean Sea, missing, date of loss July 10, 1943 (pm) + HAGUE, Raymond M, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, 6483045, USN, from Kansas, Jul-44, Sicily-Rome American Cemetery (bm) + HAGUE, Raymond Marion, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Edith Zoe Hague, Box 67, Oberlin, Kans (na) + HAGUE, Raymond M, TM2, 6483045, USS Maddox (DD-622), Sicily Operations, July 10, 1943, (CasCode6221) missing, later declared dead, dd July 11, 1944 (bp5)

HAHN, Fred L, TM3

HAHN, Fred L, TM3, 8215056, USNR, from Pennsylvania, USS Escolar, location China Seas, missing, date of loss November 13, 1944 (pm) + HAHN, Fred L, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, 8215056, USN, from Pennsylvania, November 1945 (WW2) Honolulu Memorial (bm) + HAHN, Fred, TM3c, USN, Escolar SS-294, last reported October 17, 1944, presumed lost by November 27, 1944 (nm) + HAHN, Fred Leroy, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Marie Veronica Hahn, 106 E. Allen St., Philadelphia, Pa (na)

New 05-04-17

IN MEMORIAM
USS Corry DD-463 Shipmates
June 6, 1944

http://www.uss-corry-dd463.com/in_memoriam.htm

Auvergne Stephen “Frenchy” Breault
Torpedoman’s Mate, 2nd Class


Michigan

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

New 05-03-17

CHIEF TORPEDOMAN'S MATE ROBERT JOHN BROCKMAN

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ne/topic/resources/OLLibrary/Platte/pages/heros/hpcn0181.htm

Robert John Brockman, Chief Torpedoman's Mate, United States Navy, was born in Leigh, Nebraska, on November 25, 1919, and met death aboard the submarine U.S.S. Trout when it was sunk in Pacific waters by the enemy in April, 1944.

Robert was the son of Ernest A. Brockman of Columbus, Nebraska, and Bess Klabens Brockman, deceased, and the grandson of Henry Brockman of Monroe, Nebraska. He had two brothers, Richard E. Brockman and Ralph Brockman, both in the United States Navy.

After the death of his mother, Robert John Brockman lived for a time near Monroe with his grandparents, and attended school there. He then transferred to the Omaha schools, where he was graduated from high school in 1938. After his graduation, he entered the United States Navy, and served for three years prior to World War II.

In cooperation with the crew of the submarine, U.S.S. Trout, during World War II, as chief torpedoman's mate, Robert J. Brockman rendered invaluable assistance to his commanding officer in the conduct of inshore attacks against the enemy. He was exceptionally skilled in maintaining torpedoes and torpedo tubes in a high state of readiness, and by his cool courage and aggressive determination, he contributed materially to the sinking of five enemy ships and the destruction of several thousand additional tons of enemy shipping, including a hostile aircraft carrier.

Chief Torpedoman's Mate Robert John Brockman lost his life aboard the submarine U.S.S. Trout, in April, 1944, when the submarine was sunk during battle in enemy-controlled waters of the Shino-Ashizuri Saki area.

His citations, awarded posthumously, included the Purple Heart, the facsimile and ribbon bar with star of the President's Unit Citation awarded to the submarine U.S.S. Trout for outstanding performance in combat during numerous highly successful patrols in enemy waters, and the Bronze Star medal.

Chief Torpedoman's Mate Robert John Brockman was a member of the Lutheran Church. He was baptized in Columbus by Reverend Richard Neumarker.
 

New 05-03-17

Joe Bellinghiere

http://www.cavalla.org/bell2.html

Early on the morning of 25 November 1944, Cavalla approached and sank the Japanese destroyer, Shimotsuki, some 220 miles northeast of Singapore. I was on lookout with a crewman named Cosmo, who had recently received a "Dear John" letter and was therefore quite depressed. I looked over at him and said, "Cosmo, you're not covering your section." He replied, "Oh, I don't care." I said, "Yeah, but I do!"

So I tried to cover both sections with my binoculars. After a while I turned to Cosmo's section and saw what appeared to be a cruiser, and immediately informed the Officer of the Deck, and soon "Battle Stations" was sounded throughout the boat. But instead of going below, the lookouts were ordered to stay where they were. So the Cavalla approached the cruiser (in reality a destroyer) on the surface and fired its deadly torpedoes. The night was pitch black, and when the destroyer blew up there was an enormous explosion which lit up the whole area, like a huge Fourth of July celebration. The other ship was evidently on the far side of the doomed destroyer, and was not able to see the Cavalla boldly lying on the surface less than two miles away.

The next day (26 November) Quartermaster 2nd class Pete Ureta's appendix ruptured. I recall that the pharmacist's mate wanted to put an ice bag on him--but no ice bag could be found on board. So a machinist's mate took two sheets of rubber and clamped the sides together for an improvised ice bag. They didn't want to operate, but they also didn't want to terminate the patrol early. (After the operation Ureta lay in his bunk until the end of the patrol--nearly seven weeks.)

This is a small (3½ x 5) card which I brought home.I guess you could call it The Two Cavallas.

This is a small (3½ x 5) card which I brought home. I guess you could call it
"The Two Cavallas".

I ate tuna fish many nights before going to sleep--the cans were stored next to my bunk!

One of the crew made a big issue out of his Zippo lighter, claiming that it would light in a tornado--in a hurricane--anywhere. The crew got sick and tired of hearing about this lighter. One time he accidentally dropped it on deck, under the wooden planking. The Cavalla was soon thereafter approached by an enemy plane and forced to dive. Upon surfacing, 2 men went out to check the hull for damage. They found no damage, but they did find the lighter. They brought it up on deck and tried it--and behold, it worked! The boasts were even worse after that.

Henry Albertine, Radioman 3rd Class, slept without benefit of any clothing whatever. His bunk was next to mine. When the Exec came in and saw him asleep in this fashion, he ordered him to put on shorts. Albertine protested, "But I've been sleeping this way all my life." This objection carried no weight with the Exec, and Albertine was compelled to sleep in a less revealing manner.

My battle station for "Battle Surface" was gunner with the 20mm. gun, the same as my battle station on the Wilson.

I was promoted from Seaman 1st class to Torpedoman 3rd class on 1 July 1944.

Australia: I remember staying at the King Edward Hotel in Perth. Since all outgoing mail was read by officers for possible breaches of security, I tried to outwit the censor by writing to my wife, "I can't tell you where we are, but there are a heck of a lot of kangaroos here." On one occasion Torpedoman Charles "88" Keyes and I went to a restaurant in Perth where they were offered "styke" and "eyggs." "What in the world are 'styke' and 'eyggs?' " I wondered. After they repeated it a few times, I finally got it: steak and eggs with an Aussie accent. A big bottle of Aussie beer was 10¢. One day a crew member brought a baby kangaroo aboard as a pet. When Captain Kossler found out, he asked the sailor, "Do you know how long we'll be on patrol?" Sailor: "About 60 days." Kossler: "And do you know how big that kangaroo will be in 60 days? It won't fit through the hatch!" And the Captain ordered him to take the kangaroo off the boat, over his protestations of "But Captain, that's my pet!"

 

New 05-03-17

COX, Charles Beacon, Chief Torpedoman (AA), U.S. Navy

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

Rising Son Records

November 12, 2012 

LIST OF PERSONNEL LOST WHEN THE USS REUBEN JAMES
WAS TORPEDOED AND SUNK ON OCTOBER 31, 1941.

https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?id=124689587559052&story_fbid=508884152463092

COX, Charles Beacon, Chief Torpedoman (AA), U.S. Navy

New 05-03-17

Don Merle Finney

Torpedoman's Mate 1c

https://adminlb.imodules.com/s/997/images/FileLibrary/e3e57a3324c9477aa0f384b7f3f4a352.pdf?sessionid=16108dc2-972e-42d2-af95-0bb1f9b4d5e5

Don M. Finney (USN), age 26, was a Torpedoman's Mate 1c who was presumed to have been killed March 1, 1942 when Japanese enemy planes attacked and sunk the fuel ship USS Pecos (photo below) near Christmas Island, 300 mile south of Jakarta, Indonesia. 172 ailors died n the attack.

Awarded the Purple Heart, he is among those commemorated at the Manila American Cemetery in the Philippines.

Born in Colorado Springs, Colorado, in 1932 Don was a student at San Diego State
and a fraternity member (Delta Pi Beta). At the time of his death he
had established residence in Pomona, California.

New 05-03-17

James P Rogers - World War II Battle Death File

Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.americanbattlegraves.com/index.php?page=directory&rec=48902

Introduction - Apr 30, 2017 -

This casualty or military death war record for Torpedoman's Mate Rogers, first name James P is just one of over 103,014 found in our historical archive for U.S. servicemen and civilians who were killed in action during World War I, World War II, and Korean War.

Please be aware that some information may have been corrupted or lost over time and stages of data conversion.

Personnel File Core Info:

Name James P Rogers

From Colorado

Service Number 3722105

Rank Torpedoman's Mate

Service Third Class, U.S. Navy

Regiment United States Navy

War World War II

Date Death 07-12-1945

Awards Purple Heart

Burial Missing in Action or Buried at Sea, Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines

Cemetery Details Manila, Philippines

New 05-02-17

EONARD MAYFIELD CHANDLER, Chief Torpedoman,

U. S. Sav

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://digital.library.okstate.edu/Chronicles/v026/v026p077.pdf

Home address: Minco, Grady County.

Mrs. Beatrice Chandler, Wife, 529% N. W. 4th St., Oklahoma City.

Born April 18, 1912.

Enlisted November 25, 1931.

Graduated Minco High Schoolin 1931.

Veteran of Foreign Wans. Completed two missions aboard
the U.S.S. Whate in Pacific War Zone.

Serving aboard the U. 8. Submarine Dorardo when reported missing in line of duty on October 13, 1943.

Died July 23, 1945 (official date) in Atlantic area.

New 05-01-17

William Lecil Jossi

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.tngenweb.org/grundy/mil/wwiicasualties.html

WWII Casualties Grundy Co. TN

World War II Remembered

American Heroes

By: Janelle Layne Taylor and Willene Nunley Campbell

Torpedoman's Mate, 1st Class, William L. Jossi was born to William J. and Mary Bobo Jossi on February 14, 1908, in Tracy City.

His father, who was of Swiss ancestry, ran a butcher shop and was a salesman.

William was lost at sea Thursday, July 12, 1945.

He was memorialized at the Manila American Cemetery at Fort Bonifacio, Manila, Philippines, but also has a marker at the Tracy City Cemetery.

He received the Purple Heart. Nellie M. Jossi Anderson, wife of John A. Anderson, was William's sister and only sibling.

ID # 02951900
(Source: US military records, William Ray Turner, Anna Goforth)

New 05-01-17

NAPIER, ARBA CTM USN KILLED IN ACTION

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.ussjpkennedyjr.org/farenholt491/491redicsp.html

Chief Napier was well liked by all of us that had the privilege to serve with him. As Chief Torpedoman it was his responsibility to keep his part of the Farenholt's offensive weapons ready for battle. Many of us, found him to be a good leader, even though we were much younger, as he was born in 1909! He joined the Navy in 1927 and was a Chief, when he came aboard.

His great niece, Carolyn Bryant who is here, with her family, today, represents him. She has inherited Chief Napier's service records and has much information she shared about him.

The following information is quoted from Mrs. Bryant’s letter to us. It gives us a good background of his life and Navy career.

"UNCLE BABE"

Arba Napier was the youngest of eleven children. Six of his brothers and sisters died at young ages. Arba's nickname among family members was "Babe" because he was eleven years younger than his youngest sibling. So we know him as "Uncle Babe."
Arba was born in Schuyler, Nebraska on Nov. 14, 1909. While still a child, he moved to Scotts Bluff, Nebraska.

He first enlisted on Feb. 14, 1927 in Denver, Colorado. He gave his age 18 (he was 17). He was following in the footsteps of his brother, Lloyd, who had served in the Navy during World War I. By 1932, he was a Torpedoman 2/c, and he re-enlisted in San Diego. By 1939 he was a Torpedoman l/c and he re-enlisted aboard the USS Yorktown in Bremerton, Washington.

Arba was assigned to the commissioning crew of the USS Farenholt in 1942. The men in "0" division looked up to him because he was older and an experienced Navy man. By this time he also had a fiancée waiting for him in San Diego. He served aboard the following ships:

USS Marcus (WW1 four stack DD), USS Talbot (WW1 four stack DD), USS Tarbell (WW1 four stack DD), USS Greer (WW1 four stack DD), USS Whitney (Destroyer Tender), USS Pensacola (Heavy Cruiser), USS Yorktown (Aircraft Carrier), and USS FARENHOLT, where he was KIA.

New 05-01-17

World War II: Capture of U-505

Torpedoman's Mate 3/c Arthur W. Knispel

American sailors secure U-505 on June 4, 1944. US Naval History & Heritage Command

https://www.thoughtco.com/world-war-ii-capture-u-505-2361441

by Kennedy Hickman

Updated May 18, 2015
Conflict:

American forces captured U-505 during World War II.

Date:

Captain Daniel Gallery's men boarded U-505 on June 4, 1944.

Commanders & Fleets:

US Navy

Captain Daniel V. Gallery

1 escort carrier, 5 destroyer escorts

Germany

Oberleutnant Harald Lange

1 Type IXC U-boat

Capture of U-505:

On May 15, 1944, antisubmarine task force TG 22.3 consisting of the escort carrier USS Guadalcanal and the destroyer escorts USS Pillsbury, USS Pope, USS Chatelain, USS Jenks, and USS Flaherty departed Norfolk for a patrol near the Canary Islands.

Commanded by Captain Daniel V. Gallery, the task force was alerted to the presence of U-boats in the area by Allied cryptanalysts who had broken the German Enigma naval code. Arriving in their patrol area, Gallery's ships searched fruitlessly for two weeks and sailed as far south as Sierra Leone. On June 4, Gallery ordered TG 22.3 to turn north for Casablanca to refuel.

At 11:09 AM, ten minutes after turning, Chatelain reported a sonar contact located 800 yards off its starboard bow. As the destroyer escort closed to investigate, Guadalcanal vectored in two of its airborne F4F Wildcat fighters. Passing over the contact at high speed, Chatelain confirmed that it was a U-boat and turned away to set up an attack run with its depth charges. Buzzing overhead, the Wildcats spotted the submerged submarine and opened fire to mark the location for the approaching Chatelain. Surging forward, Chatelain bracketed the U-boat with a full spread of depth charges.

Aboard U-505, the submarine's commander, Oberleutnant Harald Lange, attempted to maneuver to safety. As the depth charges detonated, the submarine lost power, had its rudder jammed to starboard, and had valves and gaskets break in the engine room. Seeing sprays of water, the engineering crew panicked and ran through the boat yelling that the hull was breached and that U-505 was sinking.

Believing his men, Lange saw few options other than to surface and abandon ship. As U-505 broke the surface it was immediately peppered with fire from the American ships and aircraft.

Ordering boat to be scuttled, Lange and his men began to abandon ship. Eager to escape U-505, Lange's men took to the boats before the scuttling process was complete. As a result, the submarine continued to circle at about seven knots as it slowly filled with water. While Chatelain and Jenks closed to rescue the survivors, Pillsbury launched a whale boat with an eight-man boarding party led by Lieutenant (junior grade) Albert David. The use of boarding parties had been ordered by Gallery after a battle with U-515 in March during which he believed the submarine could have been captured.

Nearing U-505, David led his men aboard and began gathering German code books and documents. As his men worked, Pillsbury twice attempted to pass tow lines to the stricken submarine but was forced to withdraw after U-505's bow planes pierced its hull. Aboard U-505, David realized that the submarine could be saved and ordered his party to begin plugging leaks, closing valves, and disconnecting demolition charges. When alerted to the submarine's status, Gallery dispatched a boarding party from Guadalcanal led by the carrier's engineer, Commander Earl Trosino.

A merchant marine chief engineer with Sunoco before the war, Trosino quickly put his expertise to use in salvaging U-505. After completing temporary repairs, U-505 took a tow line from Guadalcanal. To stem the flooding aboard the submarine, Trosino ordered that U-boat's diesel engines be disconnected from the propellers. This allowed the propellers to spin as the submarine was towed which in turn charged U-505's batteries. With electric power restored, Trosino was able to use U-505's own pumps to clear vessel and restore its normal trim.

Aftermath:

With the situation aboard U-505 stabilized, Guadalcanal continued the tow. This was made more difficult due to U-505's jammed rudder. After three days, Guadalcanal transferred the tow to the fleet tug USS Abnaki. Turning west, TG 22.3 and their prize set course for Bermuda and arrived on June 19, 1944.

U-505 remained at Bermuda, shrouded in secrecy, for the remainder of the war.

The US Navy's first capture of an enemy warship at sea since the War of 1812, the U-505 affair led to some concern among the Allied leadership. This was largely due to worries that if the Germans were to know that the ship had been captured they would become aware that the Allies had broken the Enigma codes. So great was this concern that Admiral Ernest J. King, the US Chief of Naval Operations, briefly considered court martialing Captain Gallery. To protect this secret, the prisoners from U-505 were kept at a separate prison camp in Louisiana and the Germans informed that they had been killed in battle.

In the fighting for U-505, one German sailor was killed and three wounded, including Lange. Lt. (jg) David was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for leading the initial boarding party, while Torpedoman's Mate 3/c Arthur W. Knispel and Radioman 2/c Stanley E. Wdowiak received the Navy Cross. Trosino was given the Legion of Merit while Gallery was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal. For their actions in capturing U-505, TG 22.3 was presented with the Presidential Unit Citation and cited by Commander-in-Chief of the Atlantic Fleet, Admiral Royal Ingersoll. Following the war, the US Navy initially planned to dispose of U-505, however it was rescued in 1946, and brought to Chicago for display at the Museum of Science & Industry.

Selected Sources

Museum of Science & Industry: U-505
U-boat.net: Capture of U-505

New 05-01-17

 

Appendectomies on Submarines During World War II

by HMC (SS) Phillip J. Chesser, USN (Ret.)
(Copyrights reserved - used by permission.)

Torpedoman’s Mate First Class W.R. Jones

http://usssabalo.org/T-AppendectomyWWII.html

Pharmacist’s Mate First Class Harry B. Roby performed the second submarine appendectomy on Torpedoman’s Mate First Class W.R. Jones, aged twenty-two, on the USS Grayback (SS 208), Lieutenant Commander E.C. Stephan, USN, Commanding. Grayback’s log for 14 December 1942 reads as follows: “2252. Submerged to conduct appendectomy on W.R. Jones, TM 1/c. Roby, H.B. PhM 1/c preforming (sic) the operation…. /s/ T.E. Harper.” Then for 15 December, “0200. Operation completed. Surfaced 0225. All ahead standard. 10 kts. /s/ E. Ackerman, Ens.”[3] Roby got a three inch column on page fourteen of the 22 March 1943 New York Times.[4]

In the 1944 Cary Grant Submarine movie Destination Tokyo, the submarine’s enlisted pharmacist’s mate performs an emergency appendectomy on a table in the cramped crew’s mess while the submarine undergoes a depth charge attack. Using bent spoons as retractors, the cook’s best cutlery as scalpels and an inverted tea strainer for ether anesthesia, the pharmacist’s mate successfully completes the operation. Based on real events from World War II, versions of this operation were replayed in made for television episodes of Navy Log and The Silent Service.

I was an independent duty hospital corpsman – a seagoing paramedic who serves on small ships at sea in the absence of a physician – in the 1960’ and 1970’s and was often asked if would attempt an appendectomy under similar circumstances. I always said no, after which crewmen would invariably protest, “But what if the patient were going to die?” The first time I answered, “Well, if he didn’t die of the appendicitis, he would damn sure die after I finished with him.” This answer was not happily received, so I never gave it again.

However, I always wondered about the World War II operations. During my student days at the School of Submarine Medicine at the submarine base in Groton, Connecticut, the medical officers and senior hospital corpsmen who instructed me viewed the famous appendectomies with much skepticism. While most did not doubt that the operations had taken place, some had doubts about what was opened and what was removed and all questioned the wisdom of such undertakings on cramped, surgically filthy submarines, especially by amateur surgeons, even during wartime. Most believed the patients to be in more danger from the untrained surgeons than from the inflamed appendices.

On the basis of my own experience I agreed with them, but I still wondered about the operations, so I spent part of a summer researching the subject: This is what I learned:

I discovered three operations by enlisted pharmacist’s mates (called hospital corpsmen after 1948), all of which had been performed in the last four months of 1942. The first, which could very well have been the cause of the second and third, was done on the USS Seadragon (SS 194), W.E. Ferrall, Lieutenant Commander, USN, Commanding Officer, on 11 September 1942. The ship’s log for that date has this brief entry: “9-12. Underway as before. 1049. Commenced appendectomy on Rector, D.D. S/2/c. /s/ L.R. Johnson.” Then “1215. Underway as before. 1337. Completed operation. /s/ C.K. Miller.”[1]

This first operation attracted much attention and was the subject of a Pulitzer Prize winning story by George Weller of the Chicago Daily News, later condensed in Reader’s Digest.[2] Twenty-three year old Pharmacist’s Mate First Class Wheeler B. Lipes was the amateur surgeon. Using the famous spoons, tea strainer, and instruments sterilized in torpedo alcohol, Lipes with some difficulty found and removed young Rector’s appendix. The operation took two hours and forty three minutes.

Pharmacist’s Mate First Class Harry B. Roby performed the second submarine appendectomy on Torpedoman’s Mate First Class W.R. Jones, aged twenty-two, on the USS Grayback (SS 208), Lieutenant Commander E.C. Stephan, USN, Commanding. Grayback’s log for 14 December 1942 reads as follows: “2252. Submerged to conduct appendectomy on W.R. Jones, TM 1/c. Roby, H.B. PhM 1/c preforming (sic) the operation…. /s/ T.E. Harper.” Then for 15 December, “0200. Operation completed. Surfaced 0225. All ahead standard. 10 kts. /s/ E. Ackerman, Ens.”[3] Roby got a three inch column on page fourteen of the 22 March 1943 New York Times.[4]

A few years ago I was privileged to speak on the telephone with retired Rear Admiral E.C. “Ed” Stephen, then a witty and robust seventy-eight. He was lavish in his praise of Roby. “You couldn’t find a better man than Roby, “he reported. “He was a lamp salesman at Macy’s before the war, I think. He had great leadership ability.” As evidence of Roby’s leadership ability Admiral Stephan cited Roby’s treatment of downed pilots. On many occasions Grayback and other submarines rescued downed U.S. Pilots and held them on board until they could be off loaded. (Former President George H.W. Bush was one of many pilots rescued by submarines.) Admiral Stephan said that Roby efficiently organized the crew to nurse these pilots.

Admiral Stephan said that Roby performed his appendectomy in Grayback’s control room. Other reports indicated the ward room, but Admiral Stephan said they chose control because there was more space. “You couldn’t stand up in the wardroom,” he said, so they rigged the control room and operated there. Admiral Stephan, then Lieutenant Commander Stephan, administered the anesthesia.

In these three cases the patients survived without complications and returned to duty within a few days. All the pharmacist’s mates were promoted to Chief, and Roby was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal.[8] Then, as abruptly as they had started, the operations apparently ceased. Moore said he heard of six such operations, but I found no evidence of any more after December, 1942, even though World War II and submarine patrols continued in the Pacific for three more years, as did the morbidity of appendicitis.

Because the appendectomies were apparently confined to a four month period early in the war, I believe that someone with knowledge of submarine conditions called a halt to the operations by enlisted pharmacist’s mates, but I found no directives prohibiting the surgery. Indirect evidence, however, indicates that Navy medical leaders made efforts to stop them.

I have direct testimony from Moore about the attitude of his Squadron Medical Officer. “He gave me hell,” Moore said. In his Silent Victory: the U.S. Submarine Victory against Japan, Clay Blair writes that the Squadron Medical Officer was “appalled” by Lipes’s surgery.[9] Another high ranking medical officer also remarked, “While this had a happy ending, it is hoped that this success on this occasion will not encourage others to take unnecessary risks.”[10] Writing about the same subject in Sink ‘em All, Vice Admiral Charles A. Lockwood, USN (Retired) says, “I was surprised and disappointed to find that the Squadron Medical Officer to a ‘dim view’ of the matter. According to him the patient had a better chance of survival if kept packed in ice and put on a starvation liquid died…. Perhaps this was true, but we got the ‘Doc’ promoted (to Chief Petty Officer) anyhow.”[11]

Other evidence of efforts to discourage the operations appears in the Science News Letter for 22 January 1944 in an extract from the U.S. Naval Medical Bulletin News Letter of January, 1944. The extract is titled “Sulfa Drugs Save Sailors” and is sub headed “Instead of having makeshift appendectomies performed on board ship, surgeons advise special holdover treatment until professional aid is available.”[12] The papers quoted here advise the use of sulfa drugs to stem the infection process in much the same way physicians now use antibiotics, and they present case studies showing sulfonamide effectiveness in the non-surgical treatment of acute appendicitis. They also discuss the difficulty of accurate diagnosis, noting in one instance that sea sickness may mimic appendicitis.[13]

Science News Letter notes, “The public may be thrilled by stories of enlisted personnel performing appendectomies on shipmates at sea when no medical aid is available. Physicians and surgeons in and out of the Navy, however, deplore such action.”[14]

It is clear then that the Navy’s medical establishment was properly concerned about unqualified personnel doing surgery at sea under any circumstances and apparently took action to end these adventures. Even qualified physicians, it seems, were discouraged from doing these procedures at sea, all though “at sea” seems overly broad. Large vessels such as battleships, cruisers, and aircraft carriers were properly equipped and staffed.

In 1942 when pharmacist’s mates Lipes, Roby, and Moore were the only medical authorities available to submarine skippers in difficult situations, it is not surprising that such heroic, if ill advised, procedures were attempted; and there were no directives, as far as I have been able to determine, that specifically prohibited these procedures by pharmacist’s mates. The Manual of the Medical Department for 1939 says “pharmacist’s mates are not offered as substitutes for physicians, but they should be men of such training judgment, and experience that the commanding officer of a vessel without an attached medical officer may rely on them for … first aid and detailed management of the sick and injured.”[17]

A reasonable man would conclude from the above that to the Medical Department of the U.S. Navy, appendectomies were clearly beyond the competence of pharmacist’s mates. Later editions of the Manual of the Medical Department use much the same language, and even though I never went to the Manual for guidance on the subject, I always knew for all of my years on independent duty, first on diesel submarines and then at the end of my career on a Gearing class destroyer, that appendectomies were far beyond my capabilities.

Still, crewmen always asked the questions.

Bibliography

Associated Press, “More Submarine Surgery,” New York Times, 22 March 1943, p.14

Berkley, William L., and Harry C. Watkins, “Chemotherapy in the Management of Acute Appendicitis,” U.S. Naval Medical Bulletin, January, 1944, p.3.

Ship’s Deck Log, U.S.S. Grayback (SS 208), 14 December 1942.

U.S. Navy. Manual of the Medical Department, 1939, Chapter 5, Paragraphy 607.

Updated 04