1940-1949 Torpedomen Part 2

Updated 09-12-17

Jack Kenneth Nash

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.oneternalpatrol.com/nash-j-k.htm

On Eternal Patrol - Lost Submariners of World War II

Presentation WWII

WWII Boats

Jack Kenneth Nash

Purple Heart Prisoner of War Medal

Rank/Rate Chief Torpedoman's Mate

Service Number 368 11 89

Birth Date September 2, 1909

From Bozeman, Montana

Decorations Purple Heart, Prisoner of War Medal

Ship USS Canopus (AS-9)

Date of Death October 24, 1944

Location Aboard the Hellship Arisan Maru

Circumstances Died when Arisan Maru, transporting Allied Prisoners of War from the Philippines to Japan, was sunk by USS Shark (SS-314)

Remarks Jack was born in Livingston, Montana.

Information courtesy of Paul W. Wittmer.

New 09-12-17

 

ANDERSON, VICTOR JOHN

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?132320

USS Flier (SS-250) (+1944)

about the loss

cause lost: mine

date lost: 13/08/1944 [dd/mm/yyyy]

casualties: † max.80rank: 594

ANDERSON, VICTOR JOHN , Torpedoman's Mate (no. 3117567),

USS Flier, †13/08/1944, [Family] Mother, Mrs. Ann Anderson, 2340 Cherry St., Box 442, Keego Harbor, Mich. [Location] Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss August 13, 1944, Memorial: Manila American Cemetery

New 09-10-17

Roger Eugene Eagan

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.honorstates.org/index.php?id=22664  

Service Details

NAME Roger Eugene Eagan

SERVICE # 6184070

STATE Colorado

CITY Denver

COUNTY Denver

BORN 09-26-1918

CASUALTY 04-03-1943

WAR World War II

SERVICE Navy

SPECIALTY Torpedoman's Mate Third Class

RANK Petty Officer Third Class

UNIT USS Pickerel (SS-177)

LOCATION Off Honshu, Japan

DETAILS Missing in action, Lost at sea, Probably sunk by depth charge attack

BURIAL Tablets of the Missing, Honolulu Memorial, Hawaii

AWARDS

Purple Heart

American Campaign Medal

World War II Victory Medal

Combat Action Ribbon

ADDITIONAL DETAILS - Roger was born in Longmont, Colorado.

New 09-10-17

Wilson, James Hanger, TM2c

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

https://navy.togetherweserved.com/usn/servlet/tws.webapp.WebApp?cmd=ShadowBoxProfile&type=Person&ID=562517

Fallen

Service Details

Last Rank Torpedoman 2nd Class

Last Primary Designator/NEC TM-0000-Torpedoman's Mate

Last Rating/NEC Group Torpedoman's Mate

Primary Unit 1942-1943, TM-0000, USS Grayling (SS-209)

Service Years 1942 - 1943

TM-Torpedoman's Mate

Personal Details

Home State Colorado

Year of Birth 1922

This Military Service Page was created/owned by William Cooper (Bill), OS2 to remember Wilson, James Hanger, TM2c.

Home Town Denver

Last Address Not Specified

Casualty Date Sep 09, 1943

Cause Hostile, Died

Reason Lost At Sea-Unrecovered

Location South China Sea

Conflict USS Grayling (SS-209)

Location of Interment Manila American Cemetery and Memorial - Manila, Philippines Wall/Plot Coordinates

Courts of the Missing

New 09-10-17

World War 2 - STATE SUMMARY OF U.S. NAVY, COAST GUARD and MARINE CORPS CASUALTIES, DIED and MISSING*

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://www.naval-history.net/WW2UScasStateColorado.htm

COLORADO in name order ABEYTA to ZIDAN

ROGERS, James Phillip, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Garland James Rogers, Route 1, Fort Lupton, Colo.

STROMSOE, Harold Arvid, Chief Torpedoman’s Mate, USN. Wife, Mrs. Yvonne Stromrose, 1800 Bellaire St., Denver, Colo.

UDICK, Raymond Vincent, Torpedoman’s Mate 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Frederick Udick, 625 Grand Ave., Las Animas, Colo.

WILSON, James Hanger, Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Nell Hanger Wilson, 2401 So. University, Denver, Colo.

ZEA, Calvin Kenneth, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Near Zea, 2432 King St., Denver, Colo.

ZEILER, Jerry Hollice, Jr., Torpedoman’s Mate 2c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry H. Zeiler, Sr., Del Norte, Colo.

New 09-09-17

HAL H. DUPUY

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.purplehearts.net/id7.html

Torpedoman 3rd Class Hal H. Dupuy served aboard the submarine USS Shark (SS-314). The Shark failed to return from her third war patrol. She was officially listed as missing in action on November 7. 1944.

The Shark 's last contact was made with the USS Seadragon on October 24th, when she stated she had made contact with a single freighter and was preparing to attack. A short time later the Japanese Hellship Arisan Maru, carrying 1800 American Prisoners of war, was sunk by a torpedo from an American submarine. No other submarine reported this attack, and it can only be assumed that the Shark made the attack on the Arisan Maru, and perished during or after the attack.

Dupuy was from Duncan, Oklahoma.

New 07-02-17

Torpedoman’s Mates James Francis Peder Cahl and Joseph Lia

Midway

Torpedoman’s Mates James Francis Peder Cahl and Joseph Lia (the latter of whom, by one account, had not even been assigned to the little task force but had gotten permission to go on deck for fresh air and tagged along ) had gotten to the anchor gear at the nose of the boat when an officer on the deck called the group back. Cahl and Lia didn’t hear him. The other men were headed back toward the conning tower when a huge wave broke over the bow. Lia managed to maintain his grip on the cable safety railing. Cahl, who had only one hand free for that task — he’d been carrying a wrench in the other — and Seaman Clyde Gerber were swept overboard.

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.ussmacaw.org/voyage/midway/

Midway, true to its name, sits about halfway between Asia and North America....

...In 1935 Pan American Airways moved in. Midway became a refueling stop, complete with a 45-room hotel on Sand Island, for Pan Am’s Flying Clipper service to Asia.

As war clouds loomed, construction of a naval air base began at Midway in March 1940. It was commissioned August 1, 1941. Japanese destroyers shelled Midway on December 7 while the bulk of their fleet was raining destruction on Pearl Harbor. Midway was a sideshow that day, but six months later the Japanese were back, and this time Midway was their primary objective.

Midway-Atoll

Midway, within a year or so before the battle. The view is from the east, with Eastern Island in the foreground, Sand Island in the background, the channel between them, and surf breaking on the encircling reef....

...Paul Burton had been to Midway three times in the thirteen months before the Macaw arrived there, in December 1942 and January and February 1943, all three times in the capacity of executive officer aboard the USS Tarpon (SS-175), a submarine under the command of Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Lincoln Wogan.

The first of those visits had not gone entirely smoothly. The Tarpon arrived there amid rain squalls and rough seas on the morning of December 10, 1942, at the end of an already disappointing war patrol, her fifth, and ran aground by the mouth of the entrance channel.

USS-Tarpon-(SS-175)

She did not run hard aground. She was able to back herself off with minor damage — nothing expected to delay her return to action.

Burton handled navigation duties aboard the Tarpon, but if he played any role in the December 10 grounding, Wogan, in an addendum he wrote to the fifth-patrol report, made no mention of it. The bigger setback of that patrol was a botched attack on a Japanese convoy. Burton was off duty when they encountered it, so it seems unlikely he bore any of the blame for their failure to inflict any confirmed damage on it.

Tarpon’s sixth patrol, from January 10 to Feb 25, 1943, was far more successful. By tonnage, it was the second-highest-scoring submarine patrol of the war to that point. For Burton, it was his last.

Thomas Lincoln Wogan

Burton and Wogan had much in common. Both were Naval Academy graduates — Wogan was class of 1930, Burton 1933 — both from the Philadelphia area, both married, both fathers, and both of their fathers had been career military officers, Wogan’s in the Navy, Burton’s in the Marines.

But apparently they had differences as well. Two weeks after the patrol ended — again at Midway — Wogan wrote to Rear Admiral Charles A. Lockwood, Jr., commander of the Pacific fleet’s submarine force, taxing Burton with “lack of judgment, indecision, inaccuracy, and an unfortunate personal manner which does not inspire confidence in either his superior officers or his subordinates” and recommending that his designation as qualified for command of submarines — and for service aboard them in any capacity — be revoked.

It was. Within another two weeks, on March 21, Burton was detached from the Tarpon and assigned to the command of the USS Macaw, then being fitted out at the shipyard of her builder, Moore Dry Dock Company, at the foot of Adeline Street in Oakland.

That was how Paul Burton came to the Macaw. As an officer of a submarine rescue vessel, he was still technically in the submarine force, but in all but that technical sense he’d been thrown out of it. Submarine rescue vessels have more in common with tugboats than with submarines. Despite the theoretical step up in the chain of command, from second in command of one vessel to command of another, his new assignment was in fact a humiliating demotion. He had been banished. At the end of his reply to his notice of revocation, he wrote:

After all is said and done I feel toward my submarine duty as the little lad must feel whose ice cream cone slips into the filth of the street on a hot summer day. Nothing was more cherished, and yet spoiled with such finality.
• • •
The Macaw arrived at Midway without incident January 8, 1944, and was in the lagoon there about 0230 on the afternoon of January 16 when she received word that a submarine, USS Flier (SS-250), Lieut. Cmdr. John Daniel Crowley in command, had run aground about where the Tarpon had thirteen months before, by the entrance to the harbor channel. Within about fifteen minutes, the Macaw was under way, Capt. Joseph A. Connolly, the commanding officer of the Naval Operating Base at Midway, on board, on the bridge alongside Burton. As she emerged from the channel, they found that the Flier had run aground backward, with her stern pinned to the coral reef about 100 yards east of the channel entrance and her bow pointing more or less south, out to sea.

It was standard procedure at Midway, foul weather or fair, for a harbor pilot to board an incoming submarine and guide the craft through the narrow entrance channel, which is lined with coral and subject to currents, including one that typically sweeps across the entrance from west to east. As the Flier approached that day, a harbor pilot started out toward her aboard a motor launch, but whoever was in charge of it apparently thought better of tempting fate amid the swells and turned back. A yard tug, YT188, then came out in its stead and, after trying and failing to get a message to the Flier by bullhorn, signaled by semaphore, “Follow me.”....

....It was a dangerous position to be in. On the Navy’s 0-to-7 State of Sea scale, on which 0 represents calm, conditions at Midway that day rated a 6. The seas were rolling in from the southwest. The Flier, about the length of a football field, pivoted on her perch on the coral near her stern and swung at her bow through an arc of about 50 degrees as the huge waves smashed into her and Crowley and his crew fought to keep her heading into them. If they failed — if she turned broadside to the surf — she could roll, entombing her crew.

The Macaw dropped anchor about 200 yards windward of the Flier and set about trying to get a messenger — a line with which to begin hauling successively bigger lines and ultimately a towing wire — to the submarine.

A motor launch (apparently the same one that had reconsidered the wisdom of delivering the harbor pilot) was pressed into service — Connolly summoned it — to tow the buoyed messenger toward the submarine and release it close enough to float it to the stricken craft. The Macaw managed to get the messenger to the launch by means of a line-throwing gun, but the launch lost steerageway amid the huge seas and almost capsized. Connolly called for YT188, the yard tug, to convey the line, but when she approached, or tried to, and he saw how badly the tug and various other smaller craft on hand were struggling amid the enormous swells, he decided using them any further would be courting disaster and retracted his order.....

...They drew in what remained of that chain, weighed the port anchor and proceeded back up the channel at 15 knots, the ship yawing badly amid heavy following seas. About 1612 the ship rose on one such swell and landed on the reef at the entrance to the channel, on the east side of it, about 75 yards west of the Flier. William A. Dunn, the gunnery officer, later recalled the ship bouncing three distinct times before settling. After the first bounce, Burton ordered full speed ahead, left full rudder, hoping to clear the reef. About two and a half minutes later, that strategy having failed, he ordered full speed astern. That failed too. The ship was stuck.

USS FLIER and USS MACAW JAN 1944

USS Flier and USS Macaw aground at Midway, January 1944. The current from the entrance channel is clearly visible beyond the Macaw....

On Saturday afternoon, as black clouds loomed in the southwest, the Flier was hauled free at last by the USS Clamp (ASR-33), a salvage and rescue vessel not unlike the Macaw but a little smaller, and the Gaylord, a privately owned derrick barge, inspected, deemed seaworthy and taken under tow by the USS Florikan, one of the Macaw’s sister ships, for Pearl Harbor.

The Macaw remained stuck. She would stay that way for four weeks, during which the Clamp made three attempts to free her. The weather, the coral or a combination of the two defeated every one. Hauling wires snagged on coral heads or carried away. Pumps failed. The McCann submarine rescue chamber — a ten-ton, roughly pear-shaped diving bell designed to be lowered over the hatch of a sunken submarine and brought back up with her crew — tore loose from its deck mount amid a gale shortly after midnight on January 25 and floated off toward Eastern Island, leaving a five-inch gash in the deck and flooding in the crew’s quarters....

New 07-02-17

Raymond Russell Reilly

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.hnn.navy.mil/Archives/010126/seabeemem_0126.htm

IN MEMORIAM

Photographs of the Nissan Island cemetery show far more graves than we have accounted for. Most of those listed below died in plane crashes over water or enemy territory and their bodies were never recovered. On the other hand, there are no listings of those who died of natural causes: malaria being a common predator of troops and natives alike. Interesting, there is also no mention of the inevitable results of some 20,000 men and an arsenal crammed onto a steamy island.

The Seabees saw their second airstrip christened in blood; even as they were completing it, a heavily damaged Liberator attempted a landing, but crashed and disintegrated.

The number of Japanese who died in the Green Islands is unknown. Many leapt over the cliffs to avoid being captured and their bodies were washed out to sea. Bob Conner saw remains along the beaches during his roamings.

Many of those buried on remote islands were transferred to Punchbowl cemetery in Hawaii after the war.

Raymond Russell Reilly USNR, torpedo man’s mate second class (MISSING)

New 07-02-17

USS Shaw (DD-373)

http://www.burekfamily.com/content/other/Shaw/Walt%20Burek%201940.htm

Sailors manning the ship's forward quad torpedo tubes, at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, on 8 July 1942.


The men are (from left to right):
Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Hollinsworth;
Torpedoman 1st Class D.E. McInner;
Torpedoman 2nd Class D. Gaines; and
Torpedoman 3rd Class W.R. Higgen.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

New 07-02-17

Howard Marion Bullard

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.oneternalpatrol.com/bullard-h-m.htm 

On Eternal Patrol - Lost Submariners of World War II

Rank/Rate Torpedoman's Mate, Second Class

Service Number 610 27 79

Birth Date October 18,1920

From Manette, Washington

Submarine USS S-28 (SS-133)

Loss Date July 4, 1944

Location Off Hawaii

Circumstances Foundered during training

Remarks Howard was born in Chicago, Illinois.

New 07-01-17

USS Hadley Memorial Website

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://usshadey.net/kia/

Killed in Action

“When you go home, tell them of us and say For their tomorrow, we gave our today”

Shipmates killed in action on 11 May, 1945 (Exceptions as Noted)

Worley S. Markland

Torpedoman Second Class Burial at Sea

Service No. 640-41-15

New 07-01-17

Joseph Negri, torpedo man aboard USS Alywin

http://www.norwichbulletin.com/news/20161206/pearl-harbor-oral-history-by-local-veterans-who-survived-attack  

Joseph Negri, of Groton, was a torpedo man aboard USS Alywin, moored at Pearl Harbor.

“At 8 a.m., the coxswain came over the bo’s-wain pipe and said, ‘We’re being bombed by the Japs and that’s no bull.’ We went straight to the depth charges and disarmed them before we got blown up. (The shrapnel) was so heavy, it was like rain.”

New 06-30-17

Torpedo Man's Mate Boston Is Honored in Pearl Harbor for Saving Ammunition With Group

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9F04E5DE123CEE3BBC4852DFB0668388659EDE&legacy=true

From Tender

By Telephone to THE NEW YORK TIMES. ();June 10, 1943, Section , Page 5, Column

PEARL HARBOR, June 9 -- While Bataan and Corregidor were fighting desperately during their last days a band of Navy torpedo-men from the submarine tender Canopus braved bombs and shell fire to transport the ship's torpedoes to a tunnel in Corregidor. One of their number, a 42-year-old former cowboy from Elizabeth, Col., told the story of these heroes here today.

New 06-30-17

Honolulu Memorial
Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii Surnames G

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://www.interment.net/data/us/hi/oahu/honolulu-memorial-records-g.htm

GPS: 21.313701, -157.847564

2177 Puowaina Drive

Honolulu, HI 96813

Published: Jun 5, 2016

Names and records published here were acquired from the American Battle Monuments Commission on June 5, 2016.

Galli, Walter O., Torpedoman's Mate Third Class
U.S. Navy, World War II, State: New York, d. 7-Jan-1946

Gannon, Bernard A., Torpedoman's Mate Third Class
United States Naval Reserve, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: New York, d. 28-May-1945

Garrison, Robert L., Torpedoman's Mate Second Class
U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Ohio, d. 14-Jan-1946

Giaimo, Anthony, Chief Torpedoman's Mate
U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Illinois, d. 2-Jun-1945

Gipson, Veldean, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class
U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Missouri, d. 4-Jan-1946

Graham, Merritt D., Chief Torpedoman's Mate
U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Kentucky, d. 2-Aug-1943

Graham, Robert N., Torpedoman's Mate Third Class
United States Naval Reserve, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: New York, d. 6-Dec-1945

Greenhalgh, Joseph F., Torpedoman's Mate Third Class
United States Naval Reserve, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Pennsylvania, d. 18-Jan-1946

Gregory, James L., Torpedoman's Mate Third Class
U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Ohio, d. 17-Jan-1946

Grisham, Sidney E., Chief Torpedoman's Mate
U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Texas, d. 9-Jan-1946

Gross, Mathias, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class
United States Naval Reserve, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: New Jersey, d. 5-May-1946

Gruber, Wilfred T., Torpedoman's Mate Third Class
United States Naval Reserve, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Illinois, d. 21-Feb-1945

Guess, Hyram P., Chief Torpedoman's Mate
U.S. Navy, World War II, State: California, d. 4-Jan-1946

Gutterman, Bernard, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class
United States Naval Reserve, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Ohio, d. 11-Apr-1945

New 06-29-17

 

NavSource Online: Mine Warfare Vessel Photo Archive
 

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://www.navsource.org/archives/11/02047.htm

Pigeon (ASR 6)

Call sign (1924):

Nan - Item - King - Fox

ex-Minesweeper No. 47

Call sign (1919):

George - Boy - Dog - Vice

Sunk 4 May 1942

Lapwing Class Minesweeper:

Laid down 15 June 1918 by the Baltimore Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Co., Baltimore, Maryland

Launched 29 January 1919

Commissioned USS Pigeon (Minesweeper No. 47), 15 July 1919

Designated AM-47, 17 July 1920

Decommisisoned 25 April 1922 at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

Recommissioned 13 October 1923

Reclassified a Submarine Rescue Ship, ASR-6, 12 September 1929

Sunk 4 May 1942 by a Japanese dive bomber off Corregidor, Philippines.

Specifications:

Displacement 950 t.(lt) 1,009 t.(fl)

Length 187' 10"

Beam 35' 6"

Draft 9' 9"

Speed 14 kts.

Complement 72

Armament: One 11-pounder and two machine guns

World War II - Two 3"/50 dual purpose gun mounts and two 20mm gun mounts
Propulsion: One 1,400shp Harlan and Hollingsworth, vertical triple-expansion steam engine, one shaft.

Chief Torpedoman John Vieira



Undergoing refloating operations after she ran aground during a typhoon at Tsingtao, China, September 1939. Short range battle targets are hung amidships.
Collection of Chief Torpedoman John Vieira, USN (Retired).
U.S. Navy photo NH 99696

New 06-29-17

USS HUDSON DD475 PHOTO ALBUM

http://bobrosssr.tripod.com/475photoalbum.html

#6-Torpedomen at work 1944
 

New 06-29-17

TM1 Guy Phillip Harman

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=56109960

Memorial

Learn about sponsoring this memorial...

Birth: Aug. 9, 1915

Death: Jul. 15, 1946, At Sea

US Navy WORLD WAR II

Torpedoman's Mate 1st Class, Guy P. Harman MIA/KIA

Hometown: Lancaster Pennsylvania

Ship: USS Bonefish (SS-223)

Service # 2796976

Awards: Purple Heart, Navy Unit Commendation, American Campaign Medal, Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal, Combat Patrol Insignia
Captain: Commander Lawrence Lott Edge MIA/KIA

Mission: Daylight submerged patrol

Mission Date: 18-Jun-45

Location: Toyama Bay, Japan

Cause: Sunk by depth charge attack

Crew: of 85 MIA/KIA

Torpedoman's Mate Harman was lost with the crew of Bonefish approximately on June 18 1945 and was officially declared KIA Jul 15 & 16 1946. He appears Tablets of the Missing Honolulu Memorial Honolulu Hawaii, USA. He has a cenotaph marker at Buck Creek Baptist Church Cemetery Norman Park Colquitt County Georgia his body was never recovered.

In a rendezvous June 18 she requested and received permission to conduct a daylight submerged patrol of Toyama Wan, a bay farther up the Honsh? coast. The attack group was to depart the Sea of Japan via La Perouse Strait on the night of 24 June. Bonefish did not make the scheduled pre-transit rendezvous. Still, Tunny waited in vain off Hokkaid? for three days. On 30 July, Bonefish was presumed lost.

Japanese records reveal that the 5,488 ton cargo ship Konzan Maru was torpedoed and sunk in Toyama Wan on 19 June and that an ensuing severe counterattack by Japanese escorts, the Okinawa, CD-63, CD-75, CD-158 and CD-207, brought debris and a major oil slick to the water's surface. There can be little doubt that Bonefish was sunk in this action.

Visit the virtual cemetery of USS Bonefish Crew

Note: Entered the service from Ohio.

Burial:

Honolulu Memorial *

Honolulu

Honolulu County

Hawaii, USA

Plot: Courts of the Missing

*Cenotaph [?]

Maintained by: John Dowdy

Originally Created by: CWGC/ABMC

Record added: Aug 06, 2010

Find A Grave Memorial# 56109960

New 06-28-17

 

In Memory of U.S. Navy Torpedoman's Mate 2nd Class James Lowell Hines

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://vetaffairs.sd.gov/sdwwiimemorial/SubPages/profiles/Display.asp?P=833

Ree Heights, South Dakota

Hand County

June 9, 1918 --March 15, 1945

Lost off the coast of Nansei? Shoto, Japan, aboard the USS Kete

Fallen Sons and Daughters of South Dakota in WWII

James L. Hines was born four miles north of Ree Heights, on June 9, 1918, to Ernest and Clara Hines. He attended Ree Heights High School to receive his diploma. During high school he played football. He graduated in 1936?1937.

James L. Hines served in the U.S. Navy Reserve from March 18,1942, until March 15, 1945. James N. Hines was a Torpedoman's Mate 2nd Class. He was stationed on the USS Kete from the time it was built until it was lost at sea. The USS Kete was a submarine that played heavily in the offensive war patrol tactics. The USS Kete made successful attacks, sinking three enemy ships off the coast of Japan.

The USS Kete was lost off the coast of Nansei? Shoto, Japan. Working on a submarine is a very dangerous job. Escaping from a sinking submarine is virtually impossible. Only the bravest, most strong? willed men can work on these metal capsules. TM2C James L. Hines died during a submarine attack. He is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial in Hawaii. He was awarded the Purple Heart and a citation from the Vice Admiral of the Navy:

As Torpedoman’s Mate second class of the USS KETE James Lowell Hines materially contributed to the success of this vessel against the enemy. The Commander Submarine Force of the Pacific Fleet, forwards this commendation in recognition of his splendid performance of duty which was in keeping with the highest traditions of the Naval Service.

Stephen Koeck and Kyle Nye, 11th Grade, Miller High School, Miller, South Dakota, respectfully submitted this entry on December 11, 2001. Information was provided by an application for a SD veteran’s bonus payment and by the Ree Heights Review, issue 9/7/45.

New 06-28-17

 

Raoul K. La Certe

http://www.neverforgottenhonorflight.org/honor/NFHF.pdf


New 06-27-17

Philip Nicholas Ruth's POW Record

http://wwii-pows.mooseroots.com/l/67571/Philip-Nicholas-Ruth

Personal Details

Name Philip Nicholas Ruth

Race White

State of Residence Oregon

Service Details Chief Torpedoman

Rating of Chief Torpedoman

Rank Chief Torpedoman

Military Branch Navy

Arm or Service United States Navy

Serial Number 3929843

Capture Details

Theater of War Southwest Pacific

Capture Country Philippine Islands

Detaining Power Imperial Japan

Internment Camp Pine Tree Camp (Fukuoka #1)

First Report May 6, 1942

Last Report October 16, 1945

Days in Captivity 1,259

Status Returned to Military Control, Liberated or Repatriated

Source of Report Individual has been reported through sources considered official

New 06-27-17

Samuel T. Elrod

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://elrodfamilyhistory.com/?page_id=988 

Elrod Memorial’s

Torpedoman’s Mate, First Class, U.S. Navy in World War II

Service # 6295251

United States Naval Reserve

Entered the Service from: Kansas

Died: 29-Jul-45

Missing in Action or Buried at Sea

Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial Honolulu, Hawaii

Awards: Purple Heart

New 06-26-17

Chief Torpedoman's Mate Ernest A. Duva

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://www.bluebackbase.org/PDF/183%20October%202016.pdf

USS S44 (SS-155)

Class: S Class

Launched: 27 Oct 1923

Commissioned: 16 Feb 1925

Builder: Bethlehem Shipbuilding

Corp., Quincy, Massachusetts

Length: 225’ 3”

Beam: 20’ 8”

Lost on 7 October 1943

56 Men Lost

On 26 September 1943, S44 departed Attu on her fifth and final war patrol. One day out, while enroute to her operating area in the northern Kuril Islands, she was spotted and attacked by a Japanese patrol plane. Suffering no damage, she continued west. On the night of 7 October, she made radar contact with what she thought was a "small merchantman" and closed in for a surface attack. Several hundred yards from the target, her deck gun fired and was answered by a salvo.

The "small merchantman" in fact was the Shimushu-class escort Ishigaki. An emergency dive was ordered, but the submarine failed to submerge. She then took several hits in the control room, the forward battery room, and elsewhere.

Reluctantly, S44 was ordered abandoned. A pillow case was raised from the forward battery room hatch as a flag of surrender, but the Japanese shelling continued.

Only two men escaped the sinking ship. Chief Torpedoman's Mate Ernest A. Duva and Radioman Third Class William F. Whitemore were picked up by the enemy destroyer. They were taken first to Paramushiro, then to the Naval Interrogation Camp at ?funa. The men spent the last year of World War II working in the Ashio copper mines and survived to be repatriated by the Allies at the end of the war.

New 06-25-17

Read Pitman Torpedoman's Mate, Second Class

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.oneternalpatrol.com/pitman-r.htm 

On Eternal Patrol - Lost Submariners of World War II

Purple Heart

Rank/Rate Torpedoman's Mate, Second Class

Service Number 201 68 41

Birth Date December 14, 1920

From Bath, Maine

Decorations Purple Heart

Submarine USS Cisco (SS-290)

Loss Date September 28, 1943

Location In the Sulu Sea west of Mindanao, Philippine Islands
Circumstances Probably sunk by air and surface attack

Remarks Read was born in Dover, New Hampshire.

New 06-25-17

 

Arisan Maru [+1944]

http://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?57991

HAUSAM, ALFRED WILLIAM, Torpedoman's Mate (no. 3418348)

Arisan Maru, †24/10/1944, [Family] Wife, Mrs. Mary Bernice Hausam, 6709 Palm Ave., Riverside, Calif (Died as POW). [Casualty] Died as POW, October 24, 1944, declared dead October 24, 1944. [Location] Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss October 24, 1944, Memorial: Manila American Cemetery

NASH, JACK KENNETH , Chief Torpedoman's Mate (no. 3681189)

Arisan Maru, †24/10/1944, [Family] Wife, Mrs. Laura Maude Nash, 438 E. Mendenhall, Boseman, Mont (Died as POW). [Casualty] Missing died in POW ship Arisan Maru, October 24, 1944, declared dead October 24, 1944. [Location] China Seas, missing, date of loss October 24, 1944, Memorial: Manila

NORGREN, OSCAR WILLIAM , Chief Torpedoman's Mate (no. 5072188)

Arisan Maru, †24/10/1944, [Family] Wife, Mrs. Dolores Norgren, 12 Libertad, Lugatog, Malabon, Rizal, PI (Died as POW). [Casualty] Died as POW, October 24, 1944, declared dead October 24, 1944. [Location] Philippine Islands, missing, date of loss October 24, 1944, Memorial: Manila American Cemetery

RIDGWAY, WILLIAM HAROLD, Torpedoman's Mate (no. 2742643)

Arisan Maru, †24/10/1944, [Family] Wife, Mrs. W. H. Ridgway, 320 Salinas St., Salinas, Calif (Died as POW). [Casualty] Died as POW, October 24, 1944, declared dead October 24, 1944. [Location] Central/South Pacific Theater, missing, date of loss October 24, 1944, Memorial: Manila American Cemetery

New 06-24-17

New York World War II Honor List

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/wwii/wwii_HonorList/HonorList_R.htm

US Army & US Army Air Force - Dead And Missing
US Navy, US Marine Corps And US Coast Guard - Dead, Missing, POW And Wounded
Last Names Beginning With 'R'

Ransear, James William

Torpedoman's Mate 3rd Class

Naval Reserve

Wounded in Action

Page 152

County Onondaga

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Charles Ransear, Parents; Rt. 1; Liverpool

Roche, Thomas E.

Torpedoman's Mate 2nd class

Navy

Dead

Page 60

County Nassau

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Roche, Parents; 700 Jericho Turnpike; New Hyde Park

Roehm, Raymond Charles

Torpedoman's Mate 3rd Class

Naval Reserve

Wounded in Action

Page 155

County Bronx

Mr. Charles Roehm, Father; 2512 Tratman Ave.; Bronx

Rolfe, Richard H.

Torpedoman's Mate 3rd class

Navy

Dead

Page 60

County Onondaga

Mrs. Leona Guckert, Mother; 811 State Fair Blvd.; Solvay

Ruitberg, Arthur John

Torpedoman's Mate 3rd Class

Navy

Dead

Page 61

County Suffolk

Mr. Oscar Edward Ruitberg, Father; 2d St. and 3d Ave.; East Northport

New 06-24-17

Torpedoman John Mikolasik

TRUE SEA STORIES

http://ussjpkennedyjr.org/wilkes441/441luck7.html

MORE ON "GYRO"

After we got back into Seattle for repairs in Dec 1944, the local paper ran a story on "gyro". In part, it read: "Torpedo gang adopts young lady. Who ever heard of a young girl shipping out on a Navy destroyer? Well, you couldn't get Gyro away from her "tin can". You would be up against a rugged ship's complement if you tried. When first sighted, Gyro was a small splashing object in New Guinea waters, but recently taken from the Japs. Eager hands brought her aboard and dried her off. Immediately, she was adopted by the torpedo gang... Torpedoman John Mikolasik, Detroit and Anthony Vinci, NYC, leading spirits of same, christened her Gyro--for the gyroscope in the steering apparatus of a torpedo. The boys are certain she belonged to Japanese before she "left home'' to join the U.S. Navy.

She shows her own fighting spirit, when the ship is in port. Gyro stands for no intrusion of her domain. She drives visiting dogs back down the gangplank and, when left aboard when "her boy friends" are ashore, she barks and bares her teeth at all boarders not officers or crew members of her ship. Although Gyro had many predecessors as mascots of her destroyer--- dogs, a monkey, a rooster, a parrot and 2 cats--there will be no other pet, while she is aboard."

There are several photos of her with some crew members, her alone on the bridge,etc.
------------------------
THE REAL GYRO (COMPASS-THAT IS)

As the gyrocompass technician and EM 1/c, when the Captain said "Heading 073", I knew, as did all hands, he had full confidence in the gyrocompass on the ship. The "gyro" is a true directional indicator used on all Navy and most merchant ships. The CO, XO, OOD, gunnery people, CIC, Navigator, among others, depended on the compass repeaters and related equipment to show accurately the true and correct heading of the ship. It was one of the most useful navigational aids, as it provided a TRUE NORTH reading, regardless of any rolling, pitching or yawing of the ship. It was also entirely unaffected by any of the disturbances, which commonly affect the magnetic compass.

The "gyro" was installed below deck, in a protected inside compartment and its reading was relayed around the ship to operate ancillary equipment, such as, steering and bearing recorders, course recorder (DRT), gun stabilizers and plot, radar and sonar equipment. A similar "gyro" was used to stabilize the equipment in the vertical plane.

The "gyro" is truly a remarkable instrument, as it is controlled in such a way that its spin axis is made to seek and maintain alignment with the geographic meridian (N-S line). This is done by combining the characteristics of inertia and precession, the earth's rotation and gravity. The result is a "space-stable'' element. Our "gyro" was so well built, it could and did operate continuously for a year, with little maintenance. In the entire system, the ancillary equipment required the most work. Every one had great confidence in its accuracy and reliability.

As "gyro" Technician, my job was to keep the "gyro" and related equipment working properly. However problems did occur. I recall one such incident in S/W Pac. It was about midnight and I was asleep, when I was awaken and the messenger told me the DRT wasn't working properly and the Captain wanted it fixed. The DRT was an important piece of equipment, which traced the exact course of the ship on a sheet of paper. This would allow the CO or Navigator to have the ship cross the same point in the sea, more than once.

I observed the "gyro" and it was working fine. I told the CO, it was fine and turned in again. No sooner had I gotten back to sleep and another call from the bridge. When I got to the "gyro" it was working fine. However this time, I decided to watch it closely to see if it malfunctioned. Sure enough it did. By this time the CO was very concerned and was hovering over me, down in the gyro room, as I was working. He wanted to know "When was it going to be fixed???" He asked this question several times. I finally said "It will only take me five or ten minutes to fix it." He said "Very good." Then I told him, I didn't know how long it would take me to find out what was wrong with it. It sort of slipped out and I figured I might be doing some extra duty for that remark. There was a long minute of silence and he said "Call me as soon as you get it fixed." He then left for the bridge, without saying anything more. It turned out to be a minor problem. I got it repaired soon and phoned the bridge to report the problem fixed. I always had a lot of respect for that skipper. I always felt the responsibility for the gyro compass and related equipment was as important as any job on the "W". I know each and every crew member felt the same. That is what made the Mighty "W" ---a great ship.

New 06-24-17

Torpedoman Weldford West

PT-157 RESCUES JFK AND SURVIVORS OF PT-109

https://jfkplusfifty.wordpress.com/

Solomon Islands (JFK+50) Eleven survivors of the PT109, including skipper Lt. John F. Kennedy, were rescued 73 years ago today, August 7, 1943, by PT-157*.

The survivors were met first by Reginald Evans an Australian coast watcher who had been alerted by JFK’s message carved on a coconut and brought to him by local natives. Evans radioed this message to Lumberi at 9:20 a.m.

“Eleven survivors PT boat on Gross Is X Have sent food and letter advising senior come here without delay X Warn aviation of canoes crossing Ferguson”

Robert J. Donavan writes that Evans dispatched seven scouts by canoe to retrieve the “senior” member of the 109 crew from Olasana. Lt. Kennedy was hidden in the canoe and covered with dead palm fronds as the natives paddled out into Blackett Strait.

When they reached shore, JFK stuck his head out of the palm fronds and said to Evans “Hello, I’m Kennedy.” JFK suggested to Evans that he be permitted to pilot PT boats back to Olasana to pick up his crew.

When PT 157 arrived to pick Lt. Kennedy up, he was upset with the delay in the rescue operation and vented his unhappiness to Lt. W. F. Liebenow** who had greeted him with these words…

“Calm down, Jack, we have some warm food for you.”

JFK replied sarcastically…

“No thanks, I’ve just had a coconut.”

It was after midnight when JFK rejoined his crew on Olasana and shuttled them aboard PT 157.

*PT-157 was launched on Nov 4, 1942; assigned to the South Pacific. It was struck from the naval register on Nov 28, 1945.

**In late May 2013, a book signing was held by PT-157 skipper William ‘Bud’ Liebenow '; his torpedoman Weldford West along with the author of “First Up–Chronicles of the PT-157,” Bridgeman Carney. The event was at the Pages Book & Coffee Shop in Mount Airy, NC.

According to Lyn Riddle of the Greenville (SC) News, the “last surviving member of the PT boat crew that saved Kennedy,” Jack Gardo, died at the age of 87 in November 2013. Mr. Gardo had not known who JFK was at the time of the rescue. After the war, he was owner of Greenville Terrazo.

SOURCES

“Book Signing with members of the PT-157 crew,” Winston-Salem Journal, www.journalnow.com/

“Last surviving member of PT boat crew that saved JFK dies,” by Lyn Riddle, Greenville News, The State, November 27, 2013, www.thestate.com/

“PT 109: John F. Kennedy in WWII,” by Robert J. Donovan, McGraw-Hill Publishers, New York, 1961 and 2001.

“PT 157,” NavSource Online, Motor Torpedo Boat Photo Archive, www.navsource.org/

New 06-24-17

Torpedoman Rooney

http://www.ussnicholas.org/fletcherclass.asp?r=44932&pid=44961


USS Nicholas DD-449

Increase the Battle tempo

April 1st to May 4th, 1943

April 22, 1943, steaming as before 233° True, in company with Whitney and Fletcher . Slept the morning and woke with a bad toothache. When we get near a ship with a dentist it is a repair vessel whose function is to repair ships, not sailors—at least that is the way it works. “Caries” don’t get the attention that engines and guns get. I had just been to a dental appointment the week before on Whitney.

Torpedoman Rooney came around as promised and gave me a session on torpedo propulsion. Fascinating. They go in seconds from ignition to full speed on steam-driven impulse turbines. How that was done was what interested me. Back on Omaha, Freddy Leroy Smith had put me offwith a smart-ass comment on the complexity of the subject.

We dogged the watch, so I got the 20 to 2400.

New 06-15-17

USS Snook (SS-279) (+1945)

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?57992

BAGBY, ERVEN EUGENE JACK, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class (no. 6697579)

USS Snook, † 05/05/1945, [Family] Wife, Mrs. Vera Mae Bagby, 5140 Enright, St. Louis, Mo. [Location] China Seas, missing, date of loss May 5, 1945, Memorial: Manila American Cemetery

GUTHRIE, ANDREW T. Torpedoman's Mate (no. 2636939)

USS Snook, †05/05/1945, [Family] Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ludson Morell Guthrie, 111 Everett St., Burlington, NC. [Location] China Seas, missing, date of loss May 5, 1945, Memorial: Manila American Cemetery

JULIAN, HARRY FENNER , Torpedoman's Mate (no. 6433312)

USS Snook, † 05/05/1945, [Family] Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Smith Julian, R. F. D. Box 110. Deep River, Conn (Missing in action). [Location] China Seas, missing, date of loss May 5, 1945, Memorial: Manila American Cemetery

KELLOGG, WILLIAM ERNEST , Torpedoman's Mate (no. 3761181)

USS Snook, †05/05/1945, [Family] Wife, Mrs. Anne Marion Kellogg, 69 Lake Place, New Haven, Conn (Missing in action). [Location] China Seas, missing, date of loss May 5, 1945, Memorial: Manila American Cemetery

KRAMER, NORMAN THOMAS , Torpedoman's Mate (no. 5650906)

USS Snook, †05/05/1945, [Family] Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Thomas Kramer, 3432 Estrade St., Los Angeles, Calif. [Location] China Seas, missing, date of loss May 5, 1945, Memorial: Manila American Cemetery

PAGE, GLEN COLBERT , Torpedoman's Mate (no. 6601470)

USS Snook, † 05/05/1945, [Family] Wife, Mrs. Rhoda Faye Page, Woods Cross, Utah. [Location] China Seas, missing, date of loss May 5, 1945, Memorial: Manila American Cemetery

New 06-15-17

USS Turner (DD-648) (+1944)

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?132309

On 3rd January 1944, US destroyer Turner (DD-648) is sunk by an internal explosion, three miles north of Ambrose Lightship, New York Harbor.

During efforts to help the injured, a Coast Guard helicopter transports needed blood plasma in the Navy´s first operational use of the helicopter in treating casualties.

USS Turner was anchored at Sandy Hook, New Jersey, when in the morning of January 3rd 1944, a series of explosions rocked her ammunition storage area.

She turned into an inferno and a fatal explosion ripped the bottom out of her. She sank by the stern taking with her 15 officers and 138 ratings. 165 survived.

People On Board

BUXTON, NORMAN ALLEN

Torpedoman's Mate (no. 6079790), USS Turner, †03/01/1944, [Family] Mother, Mrs. Myrtle Elissa Buxton, 120 Parker St., New Bedford, Mass. [Location] Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss January 3, 1944, Memorial: East Coast Memorial

LITERAL, JOHN THOMAS

 Torpedoman's Mate (no. 6553444), USS Turner, †03/01/1944, [Family] Father, Mr. Thomas Literal, Rt. 4, Hillsboro, Ore. [Location] Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss January 3, 1944, Memorial: East Coast Memorial

MCDONALD, JAMES THOMAS

Torpedoman's Mate (no. 6123616), Turner, †03/01/1944, [Family] Wife. Mrs. Ruth McDonald, 4056 Runnymede Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. [Location] Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss January 3, 1944, Memorial: East Coast Memorial

SCHLESSINGER, HARVEY ALBERT

Torpedoman's Mate (no. 4108500), Turner, †03/01/1944, [Family] Mother, Mrs. Rose Margaretha Schlessinger, 5269 Robin Ave., ST Louis, Mo. [Location] Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss January 3, 1944, Memorial: East Coast Memorial

SHOPLAK, MICHAEL

Torpedoman's Mate (no. 2837871), USS Turner, †03/01/1944, [Family] Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Shoplak, 227 31st St., Bellaire, Ohio. [Location] Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss January 3, 1944, Memorial: East Coast Memorial

STANKO, JOHN JEROME

Torpedoman's Mate (no. 6526183), USS Turner, †03/01/1944, [Family] Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Stanko, Box 553, Richeyville, Pa. [Location] Atlantic Ocean, missing, date of loss January 3, 1944, Memorial: East Coast Memorial

New 06-15-17

Torpedoman William John Richardson

http://the-seed-of-europe.tumblr.com/post/34512820223/portrait-of-able-seaman-ab-torpedoman-william

 Portrait of Able Seaman (AB) Torpedoman William John Richardson and Muriel McGlynn in St Aidens Church, Annandale, on their wedding day. 13 April 1946.

A blog about the history of WWI and WWII, and the inter-war period.

\My art blog: http://www.fyodorpavlov.tumblr.com 

\My inspiration and beautiful things blog: http://www.moika-palace.tumblr.com 

Parable of the Old Men and the Young

So Abram rose, and clave the wood, and went,
And took the fire with him, and a knife.
And as they sojourned both of them together,
Isaac the first-born spake and said, My Father,
Behold the preparations, fire and iron,
But where the lamb for this burnt-offering?
Then Abram bound the youth with belts and straps,
and builded parapets and trenches there,
And stretchèd forth the knife to slay his son.
When lo! an angel called him out of heaven,
Saying, Lay not thy hand upon the lad,
Neither do anything to him. Behold,
A ram, caught in a thicket by its horns;
Offer the Ram of Pride instead of him.
But the old man would not so, but slew his son,
And half the seed of Europe, one by one.

Wilfred Owen

New 06-14-17

Submarine USS O-9 (SS-70)

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May They Rest In Peace

http://www.subvetpaul.com/USS-O-9.htm

By: Robert Loys Sminkey, Commander, United States Navy, Retired

Submarine USS O-9 (SS-70) was authorized to be built by the United States Congressional Act of 3 March 1915, which stated in part:

"...Two submarines to be of seagoing type to have a surface speed of twenty-five knots or more if possible, but not less than twenty knots, to cost, exclusive of armor and armament, not exceeding $1,500,000 each, and sixteen submarines to cost, exclusive of armor and armament, not exceeding $550,000 each, and the sum of $4,090,000 is here-by appropriated for said purpose to be available until expended.

Torpedoman's Mate Third Class Robert A. Gardner

Torpedoman's Mate Second Class Francis L. Gruen

Torpedoman's Mate Third Class Levitt E. Krueger

Torpedoman's Mate Chief William C. Wolf

News release dated 20 September 1997 ... Portsmouth, New Hampshire

High-tech wizardry has lifted some of the mystery from events on June 20, 1941, when a U. S. Navy submarine disappeared with 34 men on board in a deep dive in the chilly waters off the Isles of Shoals. For half a century, all crew members of USS O-9 were presumed lost at sea.

But the precise location of the sleek, Quincy-built World War I-era sub was not known for sure until this week. On Monday, a Salem, New Hampshire, company used its sophisticated "side-scan" sonar equipment to peer into the depths from a University of New Hampshire research boat. A group of retired World War II submariners and Navy officials spotted the sub's partly crushed hull in water 420 feet deep, 17 miles off the New Hampshire coast. "To see modern technology in a very spooky sort of way bring up the shadow through sonar, and suddenly see a broken-up submarine on the sea floor leaves you with quite an intense emotional feeling," said Gene Allmendinger, a retired UNH professor who designed World War II submarines and was on the boat when the discovery was made.

The U. S. Navy was girding to enter World War II when the newly refurbished O-9 went down during a test dive in a submarine training ground. "U.S. SUB DOWN," banner headlines read in the Boston Evening Globe on June 20, 1941. "Fears mounted late this afternoon that the Navy had another Squalus disaster on its hands, "wrote Globe reporter Nat A. Barrows, referring to the loss of another submarine near the same spot in 1939. O-9 was one of the oldest subs in active service. It was designed to go no deeper than 200 feet.

Built in 1918 by the Fore River Ship Building Co. of Quincy, the black-hulled 172-foot sub had been returned to service to train submariners at the Navy submarine base in New London, Conn. On June 20, O-9 plowed the Atlantic with two sister subs, USS O-6 and USS O-10, toward a submarine deep sea test diving area east of the Isles of Shoals.

 After monitoring the two other subs' dives, the crew of O-9 radioed the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard that O-9 would dive 15 minutes later, at 8:30 a.m. The two subs watched as O-9 made a "slow, but normal pre-dive routine" and slid below the water's surface at 8:37 a.m., according to Navy records.

Twenty minutes later, crew members on O-10 saw the periscope of O-9 scanning the haze roll over in the water. Around 9:05 a.m., that too vanished. By 10:32 a.m., worried radio operators called for O-9.

The Navy in Washington ordered a crew of divers, submarines and rescue ships to scour the sea for O-9. As night fell, search boats got an omen from the ocean floor: oil slicks and a wooden deck fragment bobbing in the water. A telling mix of air and oil gurgled to the surface. The next day, two Navy divers plunged to heroic depths to search for O-9. Navy diver Robert Metzger reported spotting an object with a "half-moon" design on the ocean floor.

But he couldn't say for sure that it was O-9, and the search was called off. The modern-day search for O-9 was led by Glen Reem, 68, of Stratford, Conn., a retired Raytheon Company engineer and a Navy Reserve veteran. Enlisted to help was Klein Associates Inc., the maker of side-scan sonar equipment also used to track debris from TWA Flight 800 and the Challenger disaster.

On Monday, a UNH research boat trailed a "tow fish" 380 feet below the water's surface. Sonar energy pulses send echoes back to the tow fish and a display unit on board the ship. "You see all kinds of gray, and fish or rock," said Allmendinger. "Then suddenly, this foreign object begins to emerge in somewhat of a ghostly fashion.

 Then you say, oh my gosh!" The ghostly image was that of O-9, lying on its side on the sandy ocean floor.

Half of its hull seemed to have been crushed by water pressure, suggesting structural failure as a cause of its demise, said Bob Schwartz of Klein Associates. Its forward section seemed almost intact. Also that day, five retired New Hampshire submariners, Klein company officials, and Navy salvage researchers watched as a floral wreath was flung into the water in memory of the 34 lost at sea.

Neither Klein officials nor the Navy want the exact location of the submarine known. There are no plans to recover the sub and the area will be designated an official Naval burial ground.

New 06-14-17

Torpedoman first-class, James Clair Evans

http://ssn584.homestead.com/LeoSmith/LeoSmith.html 

Torpedoman first-class, James Clair Evans of Shelsburg, Iowa, who made ten of the SEADRAGON'S twelve war patrols, described the attack on a Japanese aircraft carrier on the night of 22 October 1944. Evans had been awarded the Bronze Star Medal for his work on this night and the attack two days later which resulted in the sinking of three Jap freighters.

"On the night of 22 October 1944 we were cruising along north of Manilla about half way across the South China Sea. We knew there was a big battle brewing south of us but everything had been quiet in area for several days and we were afraid we were going to miss the fun. It was almost midnight when the nightly poker game in the crews mess was interrupted by word coming down from the bridge that an enemy contact had been made. The Captain, Commander James H. Ashley Jr., called battle stations immediately and we went to our stations knowing by the extreme range at which contact had been made that it was something big. We didn't have long to wait. It was a pitch dark night, hot and muggy and as we sweated to get our tubes ready for firing we knew competition would would be running high among the lookouts as they strained to get the glimpse of our target. We could hear reports over the speaker system as they first began to distinguish and then gradually identified a carrier, three cruisers, and several escorting destroyers. It was a fast task force heading south at a speed which gave us little time for meditation. Singling out the carrier the Captain passed the word to standby, waited for her to get into position and fired. We were heading away from them in hopes of getting outside their screen of destroyers so that we might stay on the surface and watch the results but shortly after firing one of the lookouts spotted a destroyer bearing down on us about 1700 yards away and we were forced to go down.

New 06-13-17

Torpedoman First Class, Donnet Kohler

USS Finback (SS-230) Ninth, tenth and eleventh patrols

http://military.wikia.com/wiki/USS_Finback_%28SS-230%29

During her ninth war patrol, off the Palaus and west of the Marianas, Finback again had as her primary mission lifeguard duty during plane strikes covering the opening of the Marianas operation.

She returned to Majuro 21 July for refit, then sailed 16 August on her tenth war patrol under command of Lieutenant Commander Robert Russell Williams, Jr., and was assigned to lifeguard duty in the Bonins. Guided by friendly aircraft, she rescued a total of five downed Naval aviators, one very close inshore off Chichi Jima. Watchman Torpedoman First Class, Donnet Kohler, pulled out a tall lanky young pilot who ended up becoming the 41st President of the United States, George H W Bush.[7] On 10 – 11 September she tracked a convoy, and although twice her attacks were broken off by an alert escort, she sank two small freighters.

Finback put in to Pearl Harbor for refit. On her eleventh war patrol, she was again detailed to lifeguard duty in the Bonins. She sank a freighter on 16 December, and returned to Midway 24 December.

New 06-13-17

 

NORTHEAST FIRENEWS WE REMEMBER - LETTER D

Sailors Rest Your Oars

May they Rest In Peace

http://www.firenews.org/weremember/weremember-d.html

Torpedoman's Mate 2nd Class James J. Dabakis, NAVY, from Chicopee, MA killed in action during World War II

Torpedoman's Mate 2nd Class Edward J. Darcy, NAVY, from Fall River, MA killed in action during World War II

Chief Torpedoman Albert E. DeStoop, NAVY, from Revere, MA killed in action during World War II

=Torpedoman's Mate 2nd Class Real E. Dubois, NAVY, from Methuen, MA killed in action during World War II

Torpedoman's Mate 1st Class Warren D. Dunn, NAVY, from Roxbury-Boston, MA killed in action during World War II

New 06-13-17

 

USS William D Porter (DD-579)

Torpedoman Dawson eventually confessed to having inadvertently left the primer in the torpedo tube, which caused the launching. Dawson had thrown the used primer over the side to conceal his mistake.

http://navy.memorieshop.com/Stories/DD579.html

Amusing Naval History, the USS Willie D Porter

DESTROYERS ON LINE

GLOBAL SECURITY.ORG

From November 1943, until her demise in June 1945, the American destroyer 'William Porter' was often hailed - whenever she entered port or joined other Naval ships - with the greetings: 'Don't shoot, we're Republicans! For a half a century, the US Navy kept a lid on the details of the incident that prompted this salutation. A Miami news reporter made the first public disclosure in 1958 after he stumbled upon the truth while covering a reunion of the destroyer's crew. The Pentagon reluctantly and tersely confirmed his story, but only a smattering of newspapers took notice.

Fifty years ago, the Willie D as the Porter was nicknamed, accidentally fired a live torpedo at the battleship Iowa during a practice exercise. As if this weren't bad enough, the Iowa was carrying President Franklin D. Roosevelt at the time, along with Secretary of State, Cordell Hull, and all of the country's W.W.II military brass. They were headed for the Big Three Conference in Tehran, where Roosevelt was to meet Stalin and Churchill. Had the Porter's torpedo struck the Iowa at the aiming point, the last 50 years of world history might have been quite different.

The USS William D Porter (DD-579) was one of hundreds of assembly line destroyers built during the war. They mounted several heavy and light guns, but their main armament consisted of 10 fast-running and accurate torpedoes that carried 500-pound warheads. This destroyer was placed in commission on July 1943 under the command of Wilfred Walker, a man on the Navy's fast career track. In the months before she was detailed to accompany the Iowa across the Atlantic in November 1943, the Porter and her crew learned their trade, experiencing the normal problems that always beset a new ship and a novice crew. The mishaps grew more serious when she became an escort for the pride of the fleet, the big new battleship Iowa.

The night before they left Norfolk, bound for North Africa, the Porter accidentally damaged a nearby sister ship when she backed down along the other ship's side and her anchor tore down her railings, life rafts, ship's boat and various other formerly valuable pieces of equipment. The Willie D merely had a scraped anchor, but her career of mayhem and mishaps had begun.

Just twenty four hours later, the four-ship convoy consisting of Iowa and her secret passengers and two other destroyers was under strict instructions to maintain complete radio silence. As they were going through a known U-boat feeding ground, speed and silence were the best defense. Suddenly, a tremendous explosion rocked the convoy. All of the ships commenced anti-submarine maneuvers. This continued until the Porter sheepishly admitted that one of her depth charges had fallen off her stern and exploded. The 'safety' had not been set as instructed. Captain Walker was watching his fast track career become side-tracked.

Shortly thereafter, a freak wave inundated the ship, stripping away everything that wasn't lashed down. A man was washed overboard and never found. Next, the fire room lost power in one of its boilers. The Captain, by this point, was making reports almost hourly to the Iowa on the Willie D's difficulties. It would have been merciful if the force commander had detached the hard luck ship and sent her back to Norfolk. But, no, she sailed on.

The morning of 14 November 1943 dawned with a moderate sea and pleasant weather. The Iowa and her escorts were just east of Bermuda, and the president and his guests wanted to see how the big ship could defend herself against an air attack. So, Iowa launched a number of weather balloons to use as anti-aircraft targets. It was exciting to see more than 100 guns shooting at the balloons, and the President was proud of his Navy. Just as proud was Admiral Ernest J King, the Chief of Naval Operations; large in size and by demeanor, a true monarch of the sea. Disagreeing with him meant the end of a naval career. Up to this time, no one knew what firing a torpedo at him would mean. Over on the Willie D, Captain Walker watched the fireworks display with admiration and envy. Thinking about career redemption and breaking the hard luck spell, the Captain sent his impatient crew to battle stations. They began to shoot down the balloons the Iowa had missed as they drifted into the Porter's vicinity.

Down on the torpedo mounts, the crew watched, waiting to take some practice shots of their own on the big battleship, which, even though 6,000 yards away, seemed to blot out the horizon. Lawton Dawson and Tony Fazio were among those responsible for the torpedoes. Part of their job involved ensuring that the primers were installed during actual combat and removed during practice. Once a primer was installed, on a command to fire, it would explode, shooting the torpedo out of its tube.

Dawson, on this particular morning, unfortunately had forgotten to remove the primer from torpedo tube #3. Up on the bridge, a new torpedo officer, unaware of the danger, ordered a simulated firing. "Fire 1, Fire 2," and finally, "Fire 3." There was no fire 4 as the sequence was interrupted by an unmistakable whooooooshhhhing sound made by a successfully launched and armed torpedo.

Lt H. Steward Lewis, who witnessed the entire event, later described the next few minutes as what hell would look like if it ever broke loose. Just after he saw the torpedo hit water on its way to the Iowa and some of the most prominent figures in world history, Lewis innocently asked the Captain, 'Did you give permission to fire a torpedo?' Captain Walker's reply will not ring down through naval history... although words to the effect of Farragut's immortal 'Damn the torpedoes' figured centrally within. Initially there was some reluctance to admit what had happened, or even to warn the Iowa.

As the awful reality sunk in, people began racing around, shouting conflicting instructions and attempting to warn the flagship of imminent danger. First, there was a flashing light warning about the torpedo which unfortunately indicated it was headed in another direction. Next, the Porter signaled that it was going reverse at full speed! Finally, they decided to break the strictly enforced radio silence. The radio operator on the destroyer transmitted "'Lion (code for the Iowa), Lion, come right." The Iowa operator, more concerned about radio procedure, requested that the offending station identify itself first. Finally, the message was received and the Iowa began turning to avoid the speeding torpedo.

Meanwhile, on the Iowa's bridge, word of the torpedo firing had reached FDR, who asked that his wheelchair be moved to the railing so he could see better what was coming his way. His loyal Secret Service guard immediately drew his pistol as if he was going to shoot the torpedo. As the Iowa began evasive maneuvers, all of her guns were trained on the William D Porter. There was now some thought that the Porter was part of an assassination plot. Within moments of the warning, there was a tremendous explosion just behind the battleship. The torpedo had been detonated by the wash kicked up by the battleship's increased speed.

The crisis was over and so was Captain Walker's career. His final utterance to the Iowa, in response to a question about the origin of the torpedo, was a weak, "We did it." Shortly thereafter, the brand new destroyer, her Captain and the entire crew were placed under arrest and sent to Bermuda for trial. It was the first time that a complete ship's company had been arrested in the history of the US Navy. The ship was surrounded by Marines when it docked in Bermuda, and held there several days as the closed session inquiry attempted to determine what had happened. Torpedoman Dawson eventually confessed to having inadvertently left the primer in the torpedo tube, which caused the launching. Dawson had thrown the used primer over the side to conceal his mistake.

The whole incident was chalked up to an unfortunate set of circumstances and placed under a cloak of secrecy. Someone had to be punished. Captain Walker and several other Porter officers and sailors eventually found themselves in obscure shore assignments. Dawson was sentenced to 14 years hard labor. President Roosevelt intervened; however, asking that no punishment be meted out for what was clearly an accident. The destroyer was banished to the upper Aleutians. It was probably thought this was as safe a place as any for the ship and anyone who came near her. She remained in the frozen north for almost a year, until late 1944, when she was re-assigned to the Western Pacific. Before leaving the Aleutians, she accidentally left her calling card in the form of a five-inch shell fired into the front yard of the American base commandant, thus rearranging his flower garden.

In December, 1944, she joined the Philippine invasion forces and acquitted herself quite well. She distinguished herself by shooting down a number of attacking Japanese aircraft. Regrettably, after the war, it was reported that she also shot down three American planes. This was a common event on ships, as many gunners, fearful of kamikazes, had nervous trigger fingers.

In April, 1945, the destroyer was assigned to support the invasion of Okinawa. By this time, the greeting "Don't Shoot, We're Republicans" was commonplace and the crew of the Willie D had become used to the ribbing. But the crew of her sister ship, the USS Luce, was not so polite in its salutations after the Porter accidentally riddled her side and superstructure with gunfire.

On 10 June, 1945, the Porter's hard luck finally ran out. She was sunk by a plane which had (unintentionally) attacked underwater. A Japanese bomber made almost entirely of wood and canvas slipped through the Navy's defense. Having little in the way of metal surfaces, the plane didn't register on radar. A fully loaded kamikaze, it was headed for a ship near the Porter, but just at the last moment veered away and crashed along side the unlucky destroyer. There was a sigh of relief as the plane sunk out of sight, but then it blew up underneath the Porter, opening her hull in the worst possible location.

Sinking after she was near-missed by a "Kamikaze" suicide aircraft off Okinawa, 10 June 1945. USS LCS-86 and another LCS are alongside, taking off her crew. Though not actually hit by the enemy plane, William D. Porter received fatal underwater damage from the near-by explosion. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Contributed by Fred Weiss

Operational and Building Data

Laid down by Consolidated Steel, Orange TX May 7 1942.

Launched September 27 1942 and
commissioned July 6 1943.

Fate Sunk by a Japanese Kamikaze Aircraft
off Okinawa June 10 1945.

DD-579

USS WILLIAM D. PORTER

CLASS

FLETCHER As Built.

Displacement 2924 Tons (Full),

=Speed, 38 Knots,

Range 6500 NM@ 15 Knots,

Crew 273.

Dimensions, 376' 5"(oa) x 39' 7" x 13' 9" (Max)

Armament 5 x 5"/38AA, 4 x 1.1" AA, 4 x 20mm AA, 10 x 21" tt.(2x5).

Machinery, 60,000 SHP; General Electric Geared Turbines, 2 screws

Three hours later, after the last man was off board, the Captain jumped to the safety of a rescue vessel and the ship that almost changed world history slipped astern into 2,400 feet of water. Not a single soul was lost in the sinking. After everything else that happened, it was almost as if the ship decided to let her crew off at the end.

USS William D. Porter (DD-579) sinking after she was near-missed by a "Kamikaze" suicide aircraft off Okinawa, 10 June 1945. USS LCS-122 is standing by. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.
Contributed by Fred Weiss

Submitted by:

Major John H. Pierson, Jr., USMC (Ret)

© 1993, by Kit Bonner,
Naval Historian and published
with his consent.

This story came to this Web site by a passing email

Can you imagine what kind of "Field Day" today's press would have with these kinds of events?

 

New 06-13-17

Honolulu Memorial Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii Surnames Q-R

http://www.interment.net/data/us/hi/oahu/honolulu-memorial-records-q-r.htm

GPS: 21.313701, -157.847564

2177 Puowaina Drive

Honolulu, HI 96813

Published: Jun 5, 2016

Names and records published here were acquired from the American Battle Monuments Commission on June 5, 2016.

Quenett, Clayton F., Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, United States Naval Reserve, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Indiana, d. 15-Jul-1946

Rae, William H., Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: California, d. 21-Apr-1946

Reed, G. Russell, Torpedoman's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: California, d. 4-Jan-1946

Rice, Jerome R., Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Louisiana, d. 15-Jan-1946

Richardson, James W., Chief Torpedoman's Mate, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Pennsylvania, d. 14-Jan-1946

Riddle, Eugene D., Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, United States Naval Reserve, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Oklahoma, d. 6-Dec-1945

Robb, Arthur F., Torpedoman's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Ohio, d. 9-Jan-1946

Rolfe, Richard H., Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: New York, d. 28-Mar-1946

Rooney, Frank R., Chief Torpedoman's Mate, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Massachusetts, d. 12-Apr-1945

Rosta, John, Torpedoman's Mate Third Class, United States Naval Reserve, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: New Jersey, d. 9-Jan-1946

Routson, Albert L., Chief Torpedoman's Mate, United States Naval Reserve, U.S. Navy, World War II, State: Maryland, d. 19-Mar-1945

New 06-12-17

Abbott, Oscar Allen

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.wrecksite.eu/peopleView.aspx?169525 

Details

name: Abbott, Oscar Allen
age: unknown

date of death: 05/05/1944

date of birth:

type: crew

rank: Torpedoman's Mate

honours/awards:

service no.: 5557399

regiment: US Navy Reserve

unit/ship: USS Gudgeon

US Navy - United States Navy

cause of loss: air raid

remarks: [Family] Mother Mrs. Isabel Twisdale, Rt. 5, Henderson, NC. [Location] Pacific Ocean, missing, date of loss May 5, 1944.

country: United States

references:

[1] Defense Pow/Mia Accounting Agency

[2] US National Archives (WWII)

entered by: Jan Lettens

New 06-11-17

Blessing, James Henry

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.wrecksite.eu/peopleView.aspx?172389

Details

name: Blessing, James Henry

age: unknown

date of death: 05/05/1944

date of birth:

type: crew

rank: Torpedoman's Mate

honours/awards:

service no.: 2234909

regiment: US Navy

unit/ship: USS Gudgeon

US Navy - United States Navy

cause of loss: air raid

remarks: [Family] Wife, Mrs. Anna Marie Blessing, 3104 Wilkinson Ave., New York, NY. [Location] Marianas Islands, missing, date of loss May 5, 1944.
country: United States

references:

[1] Defense Pow/Mia Accounting Agency

[2] US National Archives (WWII)

entered by: Jan Lettens

Memorial

cemetery/memorial: Honolulu Memorial

grave reference:

deaths: 9286 (on this memorial)

New 06-11-17

Christian, Richard Osborne

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.wrecksite.eu/peopleView.aspx?175248

Details

name: Christian, Richard Osborne

age: unknown

date of death: 05/05/1944

date of birth:

type: crew

rank: Torpedoman's Mate

honours/awards:

service no.: 5640183

regiment: US Navy Reserve

unit/ship: USS Gudgeon

US Navy - United States Navy

cause of loss: air raid

remarks: [Family] Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John O. Christian, 3015 Budau Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. [Location] Marianas Islands, missing, date of loss May 5, 1944.
country: United States

references:

[1] Defense Pow/Mia Accounting Agency

[2] US National Archives (WWII)

entered by: Jan Lettens

Memorial cemetery/memorial: Honolulu Memorial

grave reference:

deaths: 9286 (on this memorial)

New 06-11-17

 Donovan, Jeremiah Patrick

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.wrecksite.eu/peopleView.aspx?178028

Details

name: Donovan, Jeremiah Patrick

age: unknown

date of death: 05/05/1944

date of birth:

type: crew

rank: Torpedoman's Mate

honours/awards:

service no.: 6119316

regiment: US Navy Reserve

unit/ship: USS Gudgeon

US Navy - United States Navy

cause of loss: air raid

remarks: [Family] Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Donovan, 520 West 46th St., Chicago, Ill. [Location] Marianas Islands, missing, date of loss May 5, 1944.
country: United States

references:

[1] Defense Pow/Mia Accounting Agency

[2] US National Archives (WWII)

entered by: Jan Lettens

Memorial cemetery/memorial: Honolulu Memorial

grave reference:

deaths: 9286 (on this memorial)

New 06-11-17

Hegerfeld, Lambert George

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.wrecksite.eu/peopleView.aspx?183570

Details

name: Hegerfeld, Lambert George

age: unknown

date of death: 05/05/1944

date of birth:

type: crew

rank: Torpedoman's Mate

honours/awards:

service no.: 7307509

regiment: US Navy Reserve

unit/ship: USS Gudgeon

US Navy - United States Navy

cause of loss: air raid

remarks: [Family] Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hegerfeld, Elkton, SD. [Location] Marianas Islands, missing, date of loss May 5, 1944.
country: United States

references:

[1] Defense Pow/Mia Accounting Agency

[2] US National Archives (WWII)

entered by: Jan Lettens

Memorial cemetery/memorial: Honolulu Memorial

grave reference:

deaths: 9286 (on this memorial)

New 06-11-17

McKenna, John Richard

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.wrecksite.eu/peopleView.aspx?190892

Details

name: McKenna, John Richard

age: unknown

date of death: 05/05/1944

date of birth:

type: crew

rank: Torpedoman's Mate

honours/awards:

service no.: 6422783

regiment: US Navy Reserve

unit/ship: USS Gudgeon

US Navy - United States Navy

cause of loss: air raid

remarks: [Family] Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Joseph McKenna, 108 Southmayd Rd., Waterbury, Conn. [Location] Marianas Islands, missing, date of loss May 5, 1944.
country: United States

references:

[1] Defense Pow/Mia Accounting Agency

[2] US National Archives (WWII)

entered by: Jan Lettens

Memorial cemetery/memorial: Honolulu Memorial

grave reference:

deaths:9286 (on this memorial)

New 06-11-17

Rice, Jerome Richard

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.wrecksite.eu/peopleView.aspx?195882

Details

name: Rice, Jerome Richard

age: unknown

date of death: 05/05/1944

date of birth:

type: crew

rank: Torpedoman's Mate

honours/awards:

service no.: 2748059

regiment: US Navy

unit/ship: USS Gudgeon

US Navy - United States Navy

cause of loss: air raid

remarks: [Family] Father, Commander Maurice Rice, USCG, District Coast Guard Officer, 13 Naval District, Alaskan Sector, Ketchikan, Territory of Alaska, also Father, Commander Maurice Rice, USCG, c/o District Coast Guard Officer, 13th Naval District, Seattle, Wash (. [Location] Marianas Islands, missing, date of loss May 5, 1944.
country: United States

references:

[1] Defense Pow/Mia Accounting Agency

[2] US National Archives (WWII)

entered by: Jan Lettens

last update:

Memorial cemetery/memorial: Honolulu Memorial

grave reference:

deaths: 9286 (on this memorial)

New 06-11-17

Simon, Robert Paul

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.wrecksite.eu/peopleView.aspx?198335

Details

name: Simon, Robert Paul

age: unknown

date of death: 05/05/1944

date of birth:

type: crew

rank: Torpedoman's Mate

honours/awards:

service no.: 6285455

regiment: US Navy Reserve

unit/ship: USS Gudgeon

US Navy - United States Navy

cause of loss: air raid

remarks: [Family] Mother, Mrs. Edna Simon, 101 S. 15th St., ST Joseph, Mo. [Location] Marianas Islands, missing, date of loss May 5, 1944.
country: United States

references:

[1] Defense Pow/Mia Accounting Agency

[2] US National Archives (WWII)

entered by: Jan Lettens

Memorial cemetery/memorial: Honolulu Memorial

grave reference:

deaths: 9286 (on this memorial)

New 06-11-17

Updike, Harold Eugene

Sailor Rest Your Oar

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.wrecksite.eu/peopleView.aspx?201477

Details

name: Updike, Harold Eugene

age: unknown

date of death: 05/05/1944

date of birth:

type: crew

rank: Torpedoman's Mate

honours/awards:

service no.: 8697423

regiment: US Navy Reserve

unit/ship: USS Gudgeon

US Navy - United States Navy

cause of loss: air raid

remarks: [Family] Wife, Mrs. Elayne Eveline Updike. 2338 Kimball Lane. National City, Calif. [Location] Marianas Islands, missing, date of loss May 5, 1944.
country: United States

references:

[1] Defense Pow/Mia Accounting Agency

[2] US National Archives (WWII)

entered by: Jan Lettens

Memorial cemetery/memorial: Honolulu Memorial

grave reference:

deaths: 9286 (on this memorial)

New 06-11-17

GENERAL MacARTHUR RESCUED FROM THE PHILIPPINES BY PT BOATS

http://www.ozatwar.com/ptboat.htm

MacArthur decides to escape Corregidor by PT boat to Mindanao and fly to Australia from Del Monte on a B-17 Flying Fortress. MacArthur arranges for himself and his family and military entourage of 13 officers, two naval officers and a technical sergeant to travel on four decrepit PT boats of Lt. John Duncan Bulkeley's Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron 3 (MTB Ron 3), based at Bataan. He also ordered three B-17's to fly from Australia to Del Monte airfield on Mindanao.

PT 41
Lt. John Duncan Bulkeley
Chief Torpedoman James Dawson Light (NSN: 3820056)

PT 34
Lt. Robert Bolling Kelly (NSN: 0-74949)
Chief Torpedoman John Martino (NSN: 2071352)

PT 35
Ensign Anthony B. Akers (NSN: 95640)
Torpedoman First Class John L. Houlihan (NSN: 2124691)

PT 32
Lt. (jg) Vincent Edward Schumacher (NSN: 0-81341)
Torpedoman Second Class Robert B. Burnett (NSN: 3112905)

New